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TOP STORIES

  • Killer Frogs

    Frog baits can lose their potency over time if you keep using the same pattern. These 3 tweaks will turn on the bite.

  • Kayak Culture

    The second-largest kayak fishing tournament in the United States takes place in New York City. Here's what it's like.

  • What's Next

    We asked our experts to peer into the future of hunting, fishing, and conservation. Here’s what they see.

  • Best Reader Photos, March

    Check out the 25 best shots from our readers and submit your photos for the chance to win gear.

  • Bowfishing Gear

    The only required gear for bowfishing is a fish arrow tied to a line that’s tied to a bow. But good gear does make it more fun and productive. These items are definitely worth having.

  • The Real Fly Girls

    Meet seven women with the chops and attitude to infiltrate the industry boys' club and wade into the mainstream.

  • Bowfishing Rigs Test

    Don't trash your whitetail bow shooting carp, suckers, and gar. Get a dedicated bowfishing rig.

  • The Drone Report

    Some sportsmen have started using unmanned aircraft for hunting and fishing applications. But, where do we draw the fair-chase line?

  • Small-Stream Smallies

    If you live in bronzeback country, small streams could be your best chance at big fish. Here's how to target them.

 

Top Picks

  • May 30, 2008

    Two Cases Where Bigger Isn't Better

    0

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    As the nature of my curious profession requires me to use as many cartridges as possible, I did a lot of hunting with the 7mm Remington Magnum and the .300 Winchester Magnum, and tried very hard to like them. But it didn't work out. Both have the same virtue and the same fault. The virtue is that they are somewhat more powerful than standard cartridges of the same caliber, and their fault is that they are somewhat more powerful than standard cartridges of the same caliber.

    The 7mm Remington was probably inspired by the Mashburn 7mm Magnum, which Warren Page brought to fame over his 25 years as shooting editor of Field & Stream -- except the Mashburn was a lot more powerful than the Remington round. Warren pushed a 175-grain bullet at just over 3,000 fps from his rifle, which the Remington will not do in any way, shape, or form. The .300 Winchester had to follow in the giant footsteps of the .300 Weatherby, which is much longer, and does everything in a much bigger way.

    The 7mm Remington kicks considerably more than a .270 or a .280, and has a bit more effective range, but not much. Similarly, the .300 Win Mag has bigger numbers than a .30/06, but not much. But it kicks noticeably harder. I had several rifles in both calibers in the 1970s and 1980s, and used them hard, but I finally gave up on them and went to non-magnum rounds instead. My shoulder is happier, the animals fall down just as fast, and I do not miss these rifles at all. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    Fish Machine

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    Modern kayaks get you to the water you always wondered about but could never reach—even with a conventional boat. They cost little, are a cinch to launch, and float in a few inches of water.
    Why are you standing on the bank?

    A kayak is the performance-enhancing drug of the shore angler, because it allows you to fish waters that previously were way beyond your longest cast. It brings you to places that many typical fishing boats can’t access—shallow bays, quiet backwaters, shoal-studded rivers—and many places they can. Yet kayaks are easy to store (some people keep them in apartments), are easy to transport (many weigh around 60 pounds), and don’t cost very much. You can get everything you need to get on the water for around $1,000, and in some cases less. • That price point is the reason for kayak fishing’s tremendous growth in popularity. Recent improvements in the rotomolding manufacturing process allow for the quick and inexpensive production of large pieces of hollow plastic. And that, essentially, is what a sit-on-top fishing kayak is. • A kayak doesn’t offer a whole lot of storage space. You’ll never stay 100 percent dry, so you’ll need to get special outerwear if... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    The United States of Hog

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    You are a deer hunter, but it is april. Your last day on stand was a distant four months ago. The same amount of time separates you from the next frosty morn with a rifle or bow in your hand. But your hunter’s heart is yearning for the sight of a sunrise through trees, the still of the morning woods, the crunch of leaves as a big-game animal approaches your position. Perhaps it’s time for you to be a pig hunter. Consider a few facts: In California, wild hogs have possibly overtaken deer as the game animal most frequently pursued by hunters. In Texas, the wild pig population stands at more than 2 million. In Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and elsewhere, you can shoot them spring, summer, winter, and fall. Wild hogs are found in 31 states, ranging from Maryland south to Florida and west to the Pacific coast and Hawaii. The Northeast seems to be devoid of them, except for New Hampshire, where they’ve been running around the Blue Mountains since escaping from a game preserve in 1893. In fact, no matter where you live in the Lower 48, you are within a day’s drive—or far less—of a bona fide tusk-bearing,... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    The Secrets to a Successful Hunt

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    Scouting
    Scouting kills geese. How well you know where the birds are feeding and what flight lines they choose determines your success more than any other factor. Geese usually feed morning and afternoon, eating in a field until they’ve devoured all the grain or have been shot out of it. Between meals they may loaf in a pond or pasture, or return to their roost lake. You’re usually looking for a feed field. When you find birds on the ground, pay attention to the exact spot where they’re eating; that’s where you’ll put your decoys in the morning. Study the flock. Are they bunched or spread out? Tomorrow’s decoy spread should duplicate what you observe. Mark the spot on a GPS, draw a map, count utility poles—whatever it takes to help you find your setup point the next morning in the dark. Ideally, you’ll see birds in the same field on consecutive days. Geese sometimes bounce from field to field, but if they’ve been eating in one place two days running, they’ll probably be back on day three. Let them use a plot too long, though, and they’ll scarf up all the food and go somewhere else. Most hunters scout in... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    The Golden Age of Goose Hunting

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    Canada geese used to be scarce enough that if you saw some, you told people. Now these big fowl are everywhere, and they didn’t get there by being gullible. The same bird that waddles placidly in front of you at the office park flares from the mere glimpse of an uncovered face or hand in a cornfield decoy spread.

    Goose hunting was once a matter of traveling to a famous migratory stop—the Chesapeake Bay, for instance, or Rochester, Minn.—where you paid to sit in a pit near a refuge line. Today there are geese and mini-refuges everywhere: Golf-course ponds, housing developments, quarries, and downtown rivers all hold resident birds that attract migrants in fall. The skies over suburbia can look like the Saskatchewan prairies at dawn and dusk. Beyond the condos and the minimarts is prime hunting territory. Waiting in the stubble, you often hear geese before you see them. Unlike ducks, they’re vocal in the air, and the clamor of an incoming flock will give you, well, goose bumps. Another distinctive sound of goose hunting is the thump of 10 pounds of protein hitting the ground. It’s audible proof that these are wingshooting’s big game, with plenty of good meat to... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    The Skeptic's Guide to Crossbows

    1

    By Generation Wild Admin

    Before you make up your mind about crossbows, shoot one first.

    People have called me a self-righteous bowhunter. Maybe it’s because if you told me that you just took a 170-class whitetail after a two-day stalk, I’ll ask if you did it with a bow. So you can imagine what my opinion was on crossbows, which are growing in popularity while igniting a red-hot debate among sportsmen and wildlife managers about whether they’re sporting and whether they should be legal for hunting. But then I shot one.

    As much as I expected to dislike this riflelike version of a bow, I couldn’t put it down. I learned what thousands of hunters already know: Crossbows are a ton of fun. Although it was easier to shoot accurately than a compound bow, tight groups still took skill and work. Most important, I found that crossbows are 30-yard propositions that preserve that in-your-face immediacy that I love about bowhunting.

    My change of heart was also helped by the growing number of hunters I know who’ve wrecked their shoulders through a lifetime of pulling heavy bows. These guys can no longer draw a compound, but they still spend their weekends in the woods because they’ve switched to crossbows.... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    The Predator as Prey

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    If you’re looking to take up coyote hunting, The Call of the Wild isn’t the first title that should come to mind. The real key lies in the name of a 1979 Peter Sellers movie: Being There. To become a predator hunter, you need to put in time in the field, try a variety of calling and hunting techniques, and—above all—never get discouraged.  That’s the message from Wyoming guide and outfitter Will Ross of X-treme Outdoor Adventures (307-360-8309; xtreme outdoor adventures. com). Ross spent five years as a wildlife specialist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, hunting livestock marauders ranging from grizzlies to ravens, but mostly coyotes and foxes. So he approaches predator hunting as a professional, but it’s long been a personal passion of his as well. Who better, then, to get you into the game?

    Scouting
    No amount of calling will work if there aren’t any predators around to hear it. One way to discover what’s out there is to check with local ranchers and farmers. In the West, talk to any sheepherders you run across, too—they often know where coyotes are denning.

    Still, there’s no substitute for searching for coyote sign on your own.Dirt roads are good places to start... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    Get the Blues

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    What would you rather do this winter: clean your reels, or tie into a catfish the size of a small deer?

    We understand. Deep within your long-suffering soul is the need for a fish so huge you’ll hurt yourself hefting it for the camera. But if you’re like many freshwater fishermen, you probably believe that anything over 20 pounds would be the catch of a lifetime. Even in pro tournaments,most of the bass cheered on by spectators at weigh-in wouldn’t strain the biceps of a 10-year-old. But take heart. There is one sweet-water species out there capable of herniating the burliest of anglers: the blue catfish. These behemoths, commonly caught in the 30- to 40-pound range, can weigh more than a small deer. They’re also getting easier to hook, thanks to a surging wave of catfish addicts who’ve perfected the best techniques. One thing these junkies have figuredout is that some of the very best fishing for giant cats starts right now. The following guide distills the rest of their knowledge into simple-to-follow tips and tactics. Read it over, study it well, then hit the water and get the blues. You just might land the largest freshwater fish of your life.

    The Gear [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    Fly Fishing Gets Ugly

    0

    By Generation Wild Admin

    Casting a fly for carp is like dragging a piece of fried chicken through the local seniors’ center. If it looks good and moves slowly enough, something will eventually try to gum it to death.

    Oddly enough, flyfishing for the toothless common carp is hot, a long-simmering trend that’s grown dramatically over the past three years. Carp are wary and smart and frequently hit 20 to 30 pounds. They sometimes feed in clear, shallow water, where they can be seduced with flies similar to those used for trout. There are now carp-on-the-fly fans from Washington state east to New York and Massachusetts, as well as in Europe. Books and videos on the subject are starting to appear. The staid International Game Fish Association now keeps fly-rod carp records. This is the next big deal.

    Flyfishermen, who can romanticize just about anything, are even calling them “golden ghosts” or “golden bones,” comparing the shallow-water habits of freshwater carp with those of saltwater bonefish. This is a real stretch. Since their introductionto North America in the mid-19th century, carp have been widely seen as nothing but trash fish here. Carp are not pretty like brook trout. They don’t leap like smallmouth bass. They don’t make... [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    A Little Light-Weapons Humor

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    Military-rifle humor is a pretty scarce commodity, and I thought you might get a wry smile or two out of this page from mouseguns.com. It hath the ring of truth.  My thanks to Teena Hubbard of Field & Stream Radio, who sent it. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    Pennsylvania Processor Caught Selling Venison

    1

    By Scott Bestul

    From the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review:

    Sixty-year-old William Kielty III, of Evans City, has been fined $9,500 and may lose his hunting and trapping privileges for up to 57 years after pleading guilty to 19 game law violations. . . .

    Besides taking illegally harvested deer, the [state] Game Commission says Kielty stole and sold meat from deer he was processing for hunters who killed deer lawfully. He was also accused of stealing and selling meat intended for a food bank program. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    WhiteTail News Roundup

    1

    By Scott Bestul

    New Hampshire Hunters Face Shorter Seasons
    www.boston.com

    Wyoming Installs Deer Underpasses
    www.littlechicagoreview.com

    Washington Blacktails Suffer From “Hair-Slip Syndrome”
    www.sequimgazette.com [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 29, 2008

    Discussion Topic: Toronto Mayor Targets Gun Clubs

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    He also has gun manufacturers in his sights. In fact, he’s pretty much after the whole shooting match.

    From the Toronto Sun:

    Mayor David Miller is turning his sights on shooting clubs and gun manufacturers.

    The mayor, who last month called for a national handgun ban, said yesterday he supports new recommendations to shut down two gun clubs that operate out of city-run facilities.

    The recommendations . . . also call for a new zoning bylaw to restrict the use of firing ranges to the police, military and provincial and federal governments.

    The bylaw would "prohibit establishments that manufacture, assemble, warehouse and/or distribute guns."

    Your reaction? [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    Long Lost Fishing Footage

    0

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    A couple of years ago I traveled the world shooting video for a flyfishing travel TV show that never aired. Go figure... We traveled to Argentina, Mongolia, Canada, Costa Rica, New Zealand, and Russia. Apparently my friend and other shooter on the show, Roy Tanami, dug up some of the footage and put together a simple video of some of our travels. Roy's got a book coming out in the fall. It's called Angling the Word, Ten Spectacular Adventures In Fly Fishing. He's pre-promoting the book via Youtube and other means, and this video brought back some great memories. I thought you all would love to see it. I think he even stole some of my photos for the section on New Zealand. You owe me Roy!

    The book is being published by Lyons Press and is due out October, but you can pre-order through Amazon.com.

    Enjoy the video, and be sure to check out our mini site www.bigmuddyroadtrip.com as I wander the middle of the country with Field and Stream editor, Nate Matthews, bass fishing our way down the length of the Mississippi river from north to south.

    TR

    Add-on:

    Roy Tanami is one of the best-traveled, and most talented shooters and writers ever to apply the lens and/or pen to this crazy realm of flyfishing. I still credit Roy with the best story intro I've ever read. This book will be a slam-dunk, and you need to check it out. -- Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    Humble Beginnings

    1

    By Kim Hiss

         I recently got a nice email from a new blog reader, Jan, and thought her comments were well worth a post. She was citing the 2006 National Survey of Hunting, Fishing, and Wildlife Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which had found a healthy growth in the number of female hunters, and she said, 

         "We've come a long way baby," from the days (in my case) begging my Dad to take me along with my brothers on a week-long deer hunt only to find out (when he finally DID agree to take me) that I was along primarily to serve as camp cook.
         He (my Dad) is in his 80's now, and couldn't be prouder of me. All four boys stopped hunting years ago, and since Daddy is no longer able to take to the woods in the Fall, he lives those hunts through me. I take lots of pictures, and have even called him from the stand to tell him about the monster I just shot, or from Africa to replay the plains game hunt at the end of the day. He carries pictures around and will show anyone who asks -- and most who don't -- HIS daughter, the huntress. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    BuckTracker: Making It Happen

    2

    By Scott Bestul

    In the last BuckTracker we read a lovely piece of writing by young McCall Casey, a budding deer hunter we are proud to call one of our own. But reader Jon R. brings up a wonderful point; everyone seems to agree that we need more junior members like McCall and we all need to do our best recruit more heavily.

    But what, I ask you, is our best means for achieving this? “Take a kid hunting” makes a great bumper sticker, but the details can be devilish. For example, special “youth” hunting seasons are being used by more states, yet some hunters criticize them as a special opportunity that shouldn’t be granted. Or others point out (perhaps correctly) that a one-weekend event does not a life-long hunter make, and that we should be focused on projects/season with a long-term approach. Finally, many states lower minimum age requirements, and find that critics come out of the woodwork to wonder if youngsters of that ilk are responsible enough to trust with firearms.

    So what are your ideas about recruiting the McCall Casey’s of the world? How does your state handle young hunters in terms of minimum age requirements, special seasons, mentored opportunities? And for those of you who’ve trained up a young hunter, what advice can you give for doing it right? From those of us who are fathers of youngsters to young men and women who simply would like to help a kid get started, it would be great to share some ideas and experiences! [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    Discussion Topic: On Golf And Fishing

    8

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    “What you think,” a golfer asks his caddie. “Four iron?”

    “Nah, I’d go with a 7-foot cranking stick and a 1/2-ounce Rat-L-trap.”

    Believe it or not, that (or something like it) could soon be overheard on the groomed fairways of The Concession Golf Club on Florida’s Gulf Coast, rated America’s best new private course by Golf Digest. Next May, when the $15-million clubhouse opens, the operation will offer the nation’s first “Golf & Fishing Caddie Service,” with which your caddie doubles as a fishing guide on any of the course’s several stocked ponds and lakes.

    From a Concession Golf Club press release:

    “Members and guests may go fishing anytime at The Concession. Our Club will even provide the fishing poles,” explained the Concession’s Developer Kevin Daves. “The Fishing Caddie will not only load your clubs but also your poles! They will offer advice on the best fishing spots and what kind of bait to use...”

    Paul Azinger commented: “At the Concession will be golf meets fishing. Picture your golf cart filled with clubs and fishing poles in the most perfect surroundings you can imagine. Perfect!”

    What do you think? Sound like a good idea?

    Check out the club’s home page here.
    [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    Bear Hits Orlando’s Hard Rock Hotel After Hours

    3

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    The attractions at Orlando’s hotels and amusement parks just get more and more creative. Now the Hard Rock Hotel at Universal Studios has a bear in it’s swimming pool. Or at least it had one.

    From the Orlando Sentinel:

    Police were first told of the bear sighting at 4:13 a.m., after a security guard spotted the bear on a security screen. Reports show that the bear finished its morning dip and left the pool area.
    [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    In Shape

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    "The only time I ever got my s**t together I couldn't pick it up." -- Roger Miller

    A couple of years ago I was talking with Sandy Sallee  (who co-runs Black Mountain Outfitters in Montana) about their hunters' foibles, and she revealed that many of the 50- and 60-year-olds that Black Mountain guides for elk do a lot better physically than the 20- and 30-year-olds.

    When the younger hunters find out how tough it is, she said, they sit in their tents all day. The geezers are used to suffering so they go out and ride from can to can't and freeze and sweat up mountains.

    Being able to take it physically is a major part of real hunting, and I think a lot of it is mental. I've known four SEALS well enough to talk to, and every one of them was small (5' 5" to 5'7" and maybe 130 to 140 pounds), and to a man they said that there were people in Basic Underwater Demolition/SEALS (SEAL boot camp) who were stronger, faster, and more enduring, but who washed out anyway because they couldn't hack it mentally.

    Size does not necessarily work in your favor. I was once told by a Selous Scout (the Rhodesian Army equivalent of our Rangers) that the ideal size for a soldier was about 5'10" and 160 pounds. Bigger than that, he said, and your height and weight just worked against you. And I've heard the same thing from other military sources.

    About the toughest case I've ever hunted with was a Canadian named James Minnerie, with whom I hunted moose in Alaska in 2006. James was 6 feet and 180 pounds, and the guy performed prodigious acts of strength and endurance all day long for 12 days on end. I watched him pack 60 pounds of moose meat through a bog that almost put me in a body bag, and he never took a deep breath.

    I still wonder where they plugged him in at night. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 28, 2008

    The A-Train Rolls into BASS-land

    5

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Atrain

    Many of you recognize the commentary on this blog from "Anthony" (I like to call him the A-Train), but what you don't know is that Anthony started a new job this week as the director of communications with ESPN Outdoors and B.A.S.S.

    Which brings up a couple important points. First, let there be no mistake that Anthony is a die-hard fly fishing fool; so the fly nation has officially infiltrated a mole in the inner sanctum of pro bass fishing. And second, assuming he stays a part of the Fly Talk community, this blog will be more "dialed" on hot bass topics than most, um, bass blogs!

    Seriously, I hope you join me in wishing good luck and godspeed to a great friend, and an original Fly Talk "Fflogger," Anthony Bartkowski.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 27, 2008

    Discussion Topic: Idaho Approves Wolf Hunt

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From the Idaho Mountain Express and Guide:

    "It's time to take a collective sigh," [Idaho Fish and Game director Cal] Groen said. "This is history."

    [On] Thursday, Fish and Game commissioners set the statewide season for wolf hunting this fall . . . . [H]unters will be able to pursue wolves from Sept. 15 to Dec. 31. From Sept. 15 until Oct.1, only Idaho's backcountry areas in the Frank Church-River of No Return and Selway Bitterroot wilderness areas will be open to wolf hunting. Hunters will be able to use any weapon during that time.

    From Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, all of Idaho will be open to wolf hunting and hunters will be able to use any weapon. . . .

    [O]nce the statewide [mortality] quota is reached, all hunting will cease. Similarly, once pre-set quotas in individual wolf hunting zones is reached, hunting in those zones will stop.

    Your reaction? [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 27, 2008

    Circle Hooks Now Required For Gulf Anglers

    2

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From the North Florida News Daily:

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) reminds anglers that new rules go into effect June 1 requiring all people fishing from a vessel in the Gulf of Mexico off Florida for any reef fish species to carry and use circle hooks, dehooking devices and venting tools.

    These new rules are intended to help more Gulf reef fish survive if they must be released when they are not legal to harvest. Many reef fish species . . . need protection, and anglers can help maintain and rebuild reef fish stocks by properly handling and releasing fish. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 27, 2008

    Deadly Rattlesnake Bites On The Rise

    6

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From the Arizona Daily Star:

    The victim experiences extreme pain at the location of the bite, nausea, sometimes diarrhea. Then the mouth and throat swell, making it difficult to breathe. The victim gets lightheaded, collapses and goes into shock — all within minutes of the strike.

    The potentially deadly symptoms used to be fairly rare, but toxicologists in Arizona, Colorado and California say they're seeing some or all of them more than ever, and they could be contributing to an increase in fatal rattlesnake bites in Arizona. [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 27, 2008

    Guide "Service"

    7

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Guideservice

    Anyone ever had a guide like this?

    Yeah, me neither...

    TR [ Read Full Post ]

  • May 27, 2008

    Bourjaily on Ducking and Covering

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    The other day I was talking to John Clouse, who runs Ballistic Specialties in Batesville, AR. Clouse is a fine Beretta doctor, and he was diagnosing my balky 391 when somehow the subject turned to Clouse’s nose. Several years ago on a crow hunt, Clouse stoned a bird a ridiculously high distance in the air. He took his eye off the falling crow to exchange high fives with his hunting buddy. When he looked back, the crow hit him in the face, breaking his nose. [ Read Full Post ]

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