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TOP STORIES

  • Killer Frogs

    Frog baits can lose their potency over time if you keep using the same pattern. These 3 tweaks will turn on the bite.

  • Kayak Culture

    The second-largest kayak fishing tournament in the United States takes place in New York City. Here's what it's like.

  • What's Next

    We asked our experts to peer into the future of hunting, fishing, and conservation. Here’s what they see.

  • Best Reader Photos, March

    Check out the 25 best shots from our readers and submit your photos for the chance to win gear.

  • Bowfishing Gear

    The only required gear for bowfishing is a fish arrow tied to a line that’s tied to a bow. But good gear does make it more fun and productive. These items are definitely worth having.

  • The Real Fly Girls

    Meet seven women with the chops and attitude to infiltrate the industry boys' club and wade into the mainstream.

  • Bowfishing Rigs Test

    Don't trash your whitetail bow shooting carp, suckers, and gar. Get a dedicated bowfishing rig.

  • The Drone Report

    Some sportsmen have started using unmanned aircraft for hunting and fishing applications. But, where do we draw the fair-chase line?

  • Small-Stream Smallies

    If you live in bronzeback country, small streams could be your best chance at big fish. Here's how to target them.

 

Top Picks

  • April 1, 2008

    Taking it Too Far

    1

    By Kim Hiss

         As with many activities, it can be easy for enthusiasm to get out of hand. Especially when there's the potential for financial gain. Such, unfortunately, can be the case with shed hunting. In response to problems with some Wyoming area shed hunters, the state is reportedly considering a regulation to limit the practice, according to this WyomingNews.com story.
         A Jackson region spokesperson for the state Fish and Game Department illustrated the enthusiasm of area shed hunters by saying that vehicles line up as many as three days before the May 1 opening of closed elk range, when it's legal to enter for antlers.
         However the article also cites a few Game and Fish reports of shed hunters taking it way too far, harassing elk and deer for their antlers.    
         It's hard to argue with the state's apparent interest in cracking down on such reprehensible, out-of-hand activities as "harassing" deer (especially right after winter). But there are also concerns about the actions of the few resulting in the over-regulation of the many. What do you think, and what's it like in your area. -K.H. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 1, 2008

    Dorado in Colorado!

    9

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Joeydorado_2

    Apparently the recent "false flood" experiment in the Grand Canyon did
    have a notable impact on the aqualogy of the Colorado River system.
    In fact, prolific runs of dorado (mahi mahi, dolphin) have reportedly
    pulsed out of the Sea of Cortez, and into the freshwater rivers in the
    American Southwest. In this case (see photo) a reasonably fresh
    "peanut" do-do seems to have made its way into the upper Colorado
    River, near Kremmling, Colorado.

    Apparently, it ate a black woolly
    bugger, and was soon after sold to a local sushi bar. "Normally, fresh
    dorado is a pipe dream at altitude, but this is amazing," said angler
    Joey Lin. "I don't know if the false flood did jack s#*& for the
    humpback chub below Glen Canyon, but I think the scientists really hit
    a home run with this new fishing bonanza in the West."

    The only issue at this time is what to call the fish, as they go by
    different names in different parts of the world. Right now, "dorado"
    seems to be leading in angler preference, as it more accurately
    reflects the region's Spanish influence. However, "desert dolphin"
    and "mountain mahi" are garnering considerable momentum. Cast your
    vote by comment below. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 31, 2008

    Photo Hunt: Piebalds and Albinos

    0

    By Scott Bestul

    It seems that albino whitetails are a hot topic these days. See Dave Hurteau's news coverage of the potential lifting of a ban on shooting albinos in Michigan and our latest albino gallery .

    We're curious to see if there's more photos of albino and piebald whitetail out there, so if you have any, click here  to email them to us. We may use them in a future gallery. - The Eds. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 31, 2008

    A Look Over the Fence

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    Five years ago, I was on a hunt in a high-fence ranch in northern South Africa when a friend shot and wounded an eland. He, I, the PH and two trackers followed the animal for four days, dawn to dusk, when the blood trail finally dried up and we could see that he was eating and drinking and not hit seriously.

    The point is that we were hunting inside a high fence and we never caught up. Hunting in the RSA is now a big business, and game animals are becoming extremely valuable, so a high fence makes sense because it keeps them from wandering off, and it keeps non-paying personnel from wandering in and poaching your critters.

    The plain fact is, that if you have enough acreage inside the fence and enough cover, the game has all the chance it needs to stay alive. Aesthetically it is not nearly so pleasing as hunting without fences, but that is the way things are today. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 31, 2008

    Hockey: The Sport for Flyfishers

    5

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    My hoops bracket fell apart yesterday when Memphis dusted Texas ... which ticked me off because I had all the fundamental elements for success in place: Assume the Big 10 is overrated and will choke, find a hot 3-shooting team, dismiss the team that cannot shoot free throws (which is what killed me with Memphis), and factor in pseudo-home court advantages when possible (good job UNC, not quite, Longhorns).

    Truthfully, I didn't even tune in, because I was too busy watching far more interesting NCAA tournament action ... on the ice. Now you tell me what's not to love about hockey. Fast action ... big hits ... in the last two minutes of the game, you aren't subjected to 14 timeouts with a barrage of Viagra commercials ... and the skill those athletes possess, combining fancy skating on a slippery surface, with graceful stickwork and pinpoint shots ...

    Hey wait ... slippery feet, fancy stickwork, innate skills developed over years ... that's FLYFISHING!!!

    Granted, we're a bit light on the athleticism, mullets, and bloody knuckles, but if anyone wants to argue the beauty of hockey as a distant third cousin twice-removed from flyfishing, I'm ready to drop my fingerless gloves and have a go, right now. Well, maybe not.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 31, 2008

    Discussion Topic: Is Your Venison Safe To Eat?

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From KFYR-TV news in North Dakota:

    Doctors say deer meat has a lot of benefits. It’s lean and low in cholesterol. But something deadly could be hiding within. Dr. William Cornatzer conducted CT scans on 100 pounds of venison collected from dozens of different sources and was shocked to find high levels of lead in about 60% of the meat.

    And from the Bismarck Tribune:

    Packages of ground venison donated to food pantries through the Sportsmen Against Hunger program tested "strongly positive" for lead, prompting the [North Dakota] Department of Health to urge pantries not to use or distribute the venison.

    Cornatzer said he also tossed the remaining venison out of his freezer.

    "I hate to admit it, but I did. I am not consuming it" he said Thursday. "There is lead in meat that does not have blood marks in it. It’s not like lead. It’s like lead dust."

    Cornatzer, a hunter, says he’ll still target deer with his .270 next fall, but with lead-free bullets offered by Barnes, Federal, or Nosler. Meanwhile, the state Department of Health lead program coordinator says she needs to see more research—and will eat the venison in her freezer for now.

    So, will this report have any affect on whether you eat the venison in your freezer, or what type of bullets you use next year? [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 31, 2008

    Big Changes At NWTF As CEO Keck Resigns

    2

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From the Southern Sporting Journal :

    Wow, talk about a quick departure. Less than a week after National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) CEO Rob Keck was schmoozing at the Alabama Governor’s One-Shot Turkey Hunt, the longtime organization head abruptly announced his resignation this morning during an all-staff meeting. The announcement, a complete surprise to the staff and industry alike, comes just a day after the federation's board of directors forced Chief Operating Officer Carl Brown and Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing Dick Rosenlieb to step down. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 28, 2008

    BuckTracker: Shed Poacher Candid Camera

    2

    By Scott Bestul

    Lots of deer guys pull their trail cameras for the season -- a good idea for routine maintenance and battery replacement -- but this camera was out long enough to catch a shed poacher in the act.

    Shedpoacher11

    The photo is a little blurry, but the young gentleman (and I use the term loosely) has antlers in his hands as well as a backpack stuffed full of them. He was caught and the photo used to prosecute him for trespassing. Unfortunately, for some reason the antlers were not confiscated and his fine was a meager one. However, he did confess to  trespassing on other properties and may face additional charges.

    I'm interested in hearing whether other readers have caught trespassers with trail cameras? One of my hunting buddies snapped a photo of a neighbor walking past one of our tree stands last summer. How 'bout other oddities? Let me know, and send pics if you've got 'em! [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 28, 2008

    Ways to Make Them Pay

    1

    By Kim Hiss

         Illinois' ranking among the country's worst states on the issue of child support collection is getting a little better thanks to its new hit-em-where-it-hurts policy of denying hunting and fishing licenses to people who are behind on their child support.
         According to this Chicago Tribune story, since the program went into effect six months ago, the state has collected almost $130,000 from 90 parents who owed child support, but were denied licenses until they started to pay up. Interestingly, 88 parents decided to give up on their licenses rather than pay. And soberingly (you can never have too many adverbs), custodial parents in Illinois, who are mostly women, are still owed a grand total of $3.2 billion with a "b" in back child support.
         The story also cited some successes in other states that have implemented the policy. One Maine hunter, for example, reportedly paid $30,000 in back child support to hunt moose.
         The Illinois article was built around a mother of two teenage boys, whose father hadn't paid child support since 2005. But when he went to apply for his hunting license last year, he was denied. The father finally got the license by starting a payment plan, and the family used the money to enlarge their too-small kitchen. Sounds like another success story. Can you think of a down side to such state programs? -K.H. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 28, 2008

    The Fish You Never See

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Splash_4

    It's the splash. That noise you hear behind you, up stream, or on the other side of the boat. You know, when it's just getting dark.

    Possibly catching a glimpse of the water splashing down, or a tail slipping back into the water. Just when you'd given up hope that there were even fish to be had where you decided to wet a line. That stupid little sound that makes you stay an extra hour.

    This particular splash was a bit bigger than normal. What do you think made it?

    tim [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 28, 2008

    More Nostalgia, and Rat Shooting

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    Continued from Dave's earlier post, On Dear Days Gone By ...

    Shooting at a shooting gallery paled, however, when I went off to college and discovered the joys of shooting rats in a dump. A few miles from campus was an old-fashioned country dump, out in the middle of nowhere, that was the preferred habitat of Rattus norvegicus, the common brown rat.

    This remarkable mammal actually evolved in northern Asia. It is prolific (a fertile lady rat can produce 90 ratlets a year), able to live anywhere, and eat anything. Rats are the only animals aside from man and a few primates to possess metacognition; i.e., the ability to think about thinking. This gives them an astounding learning curve and explains why the little bastards always seem to be a couple of steps ahead of us.

    My brother and I would take our chosen rat rifles (I used a Remington Nylon Model 66) to the dump and have at it. In addition to the many funky smells available, there was no end of targets, either rodent or inanimate. If you saw something that looked like it needed a bullet, you gave it a bullet. No one cared. And if you heard the unforgettable bwooooo that a ricocheting .22 makes at it howls past your head, so what? We were at the Age of Indestructibility.

    Now this is no more. All dumps are sanitary, and even if they weren't you couldn't shoot in them. I've gotten most forms of hunting pretty well out of my system. But if I had the chance to go rat shooting one more time I would grab my .22, a brick of ammo, put on a pair of shoes I no longer cared about, and have at it. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 27, 2008

    Discussion Topic: Did President Bush Pardon a Poacher?

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    From an AP story in The Hayes Daily News:

    A Morris County farmer will be able to hunt again after President Bush pardoned him on Tuesday, clearing a felony from his record that prevented him from being able to hunt for the past 10 years. . . .

    Kenneth Britt, on the advice of his attorney, pleaded guilty to one felony charge related to a deer-hunting incident that involved several other people, including his brother, Ronald Britt.

    Kenneth Britt was sentenced in 1998 to three years of probation for conspiracy to violate federal and state fish and wildlife laws, and was ordered to pay $8,250 in restitution. . .

    "I live on a farm out here in the middle of Kansas and I like to hunt," Britt said. "I haven't been able to hunt for about 10 years. I'd like to do it again."

    Now that all sounds just fine, doesn’t it? But there’s something missing here. I read every report I could find on this story this morning, and not one of them details what Britt did to get himself in so much trouble. Then I came across a link posted on The Topeka Capital-Journal’s online reader-comment section to a story previously published in that paper, entitled “Britt’s Lawbreaking Wasn’t By Accident,” which reads in part:

    Seems like three brothers, Ronald, Keith and Brent Britt, operated a hunting service called Clark's Creek Outfitters. They had a good success rate for their clients, especially on white-tail deer.

    For the last two seasons the brothers booked (unknowingly, of course) undercover agents from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Wildlife & Parks.

    The agents watched the brothers in action. They used CBs, chased deer in pickups, regularly trespassed on land they were forbidden to enter, shot over the limit, sold venison ... a whole string of offenses. . . .

    THESE ARE SOME notorious dudes. I've heard from people around White City and they, to a person, agreed with my initial column when I called the Britt brothers "scum."

    So now that you have the back-story—or at least a version of it—what do you think of the pardon? And what do you think were the President's reasons? [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 27, 2008

    Should Michigan Protect Albino Deer?

    0

    By Scott Bestul

    From the Lansing State Journal:

    State Department of Natural Resources Director Rebecca Humphries wants to make it legal to kill albino deer during the whitetail deer season in Michigan, reversing a ban that has been in effect for 20 years or so.

    Humphries argues that the law, as it now stands, is both an unreasonable burden on hunters and biologically unsound.

    So why does the law exist? The answer appears to be a classic tale of a senator using the state legislature as his personal playground.

    According to this article, the law started as a way to protect a friend’s pet deer. Seem reasonable to you? [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 27, 2008

    Whitetail News Roundup

    1

    By Scott Bestul

    Doctor Finds Dangerous Lead Levels In Venison

    From the KFYR-TV news in North Dakota:

    Doctors say deer meat has a lot of benefits. It’s lean and low in cholesterol. But something deadly could be hiding within. Dr. William Cornatzer conducted CT scans on 100 pounds of venison collected from dozens of different sources and was shocked to find high levels of lead in about 60% of the meat.

    Look for more coverage on the Field Notes blog tomorrow.

    Minnesota Men Busted For Transferring Deer Tags
    http://www.wctrib.com/articles/index.cfm?id=35222&section=News

    Delaware Discusses Deer Antler Restrictions
    http://www.thedailystar.com/local/local_story_087040024.html [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 27, 2008

    Mine Fight Builds in Alaska

    3

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    For those of you who missed it, I wrote a conservation column in the March '08 issue of Field & Stream on the Pebble Mine project in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska. The Pebble project could reap billions in gold and copper ... but at a potentially greater price, namely the largest wild salmon fishery in the world. For more context, click to see the Red Gold Trailer by our friends at Felt Soul Media ... or the efforts of Trout Unlimited to save Bristol Bay.

    Yesterday, I got a note from Scott Hed of the Sportsman's Alliance for Alaska explaining how the issue is quickly expanding beyond the Pebble site, as other mining interests ramp up development efforts in the area.

    In a nutshell, this year will be critical in determining the future of mining v. fishing in Alaska, and possibly beyond. Hed explained: "If the Clean Water Initiative passes in Alaska (assuming it survives an Alaska Supreme Court review) this fall, these (mines) will all be very difficult to move forward. However, it’s now become much more than stopping Pebble Mine. We really need to rally the world of hunting and angling – individuals, conservation groups, businesses, etc."

    That's where you can help. You should look into the matter, encourage your friends to do so, and weigh in, now, on what I believe to be the most pressing issue concerning fishery conservation in the world. One way to do so, is to E-mail Alaska's governor, Sarah Palin, expressing your desire that some of the last great wild fisheries on the planet be protected, at all costs. E-mail Governor Palin

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 27, 2008

    Discussion Topic: Leave only footprints

    0

    Hunters of all kinds have been reminded to [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Water Dogs

    2

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Jackmama

    Well folks, I'm lazy and can barely put together a coherent sentence on a regular basis so I give you yet another simple photograph. It's what I do best. We'll leave that fancy writing stuff up to Kirk.

    This photo just ran as a full page in The Drake magazine. It was included in a photo essay on water dogs. Nice piece if I do say so myself. I highly recommend picking the latest issue up at your local fly shop. It's their tenth anniversary issue.

    This is our good friend Jack West of Alabama and his dog Mama. She pretty much demands front seat.

    tim [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    BuckTracker: Classic Iowa

    1

    By Scott Bestul

    Are deer “classics” as big in other regions as they are in the Midwest? For those of you who’ve never been to one, a deer classic is basically a hunting show devoted solely (well, almost) to whitetail deer and the folks who hunt them. Like other sportsman’s shows, classics can host some decidedly non-hunting vendors, though most don’t dip into the realm of the “booth babe” (see Petzal’s SHOT show reports). Classics give whitetail nerds a mid-winter chance to rendezvous, gawk at big deer mounts and maintain sanity until the weather breaks and shed hunting begins.

    I suppose I have been going to Deer Classics for twenty years now, and two stand out. One is the annual Wisconsin Deer & Turkey Expo (which I hope to cover in a couple weeks) one of the longest-running and well-attended deer shows around. The other is the Iowa Deer Classic, which is decidedly newer, but surely worth the trip.. There are dozens of vendors with quality gear, good seminars from respected whitetail hunters (on my first trip I sat in a session which featured four men who had shot world record whitetails in some category; Mel Johnson, Del Austin, Milo Hansen and Mike Beatty). And there are always friends to reunite with.

    Oh, and the antlers. My goodness, the antlers. Now don’t get me wrong; trophy bucks are not the only measure of a healthy deer herd. But they are certainly one barometer. And if the crop of monsters at the Hawkeye Deer Classic is any indicator, the hunting forecast there is as good as it gets. And the thing that stood out to me among all those huge deer; towering typicals, massive non-typs, gun, bow and muzzleloader kills? The distribution. Sure there are hotspots in the Hawkeye State. Every place has ‘em. But from what I saw, hunt about any county there and you stand at least a chance of shooting a whitetail of which dreams are made. And that, my friends, is an indicator of a well-managed deer herd. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Second Time's a Charm

    1

    By Kim Hiss

         We've seen blog reader Laura Benjamin from Colorado Springs, Colo. with some nice animals in recent months. In July, we had a photo of her with her first elk, and in November another photo with her first muley.

         Well, Laura just further updated the blog scrapbook by sending two more photos from her January 2008 elk hunt near Craig, Colo., during which she was the only woman among five guys. The first picture she describes as an, "elk herd posing against the horizon just as the icy fog started to burn off."
    Copyelkmaybellcojan2008

         The second photo is the second elk Laura has gotten, which she took with her .308 at about 175 yards.
    Laurabenjaminjan2008coloradohunt

        Laura's been updating her own blog about the hunt, (Days One and Two are up, day Three is yet to be posted). Here's a bit from her description of Day two. Congratulations, Laura, it sounds (and looks) like you had a great time! - K.H.

         So there's Dave and I slogging up the hill making enough snowshoe noise to wake the dead. I'm chatting away, "Isn't this beautiful up here? Look at how the moon is shining through the mist. Do ya think we'll see some elk soon? Are we there yet?"
         All of a sudden, he grabs my arm. (An important non-verbal signal that usually means, "Please stop talking" or perhaps, "Please shut up.")
         "Shhh, there's elk," he whispers. "There's elk! Right - over - there!"
         Since he's taller than me, he sees them first. Being shorter, I can only see the sagebrush tops, so I grab my field glasses and quickly scan the horizon.
         "What elk? I can't see 'em!" I shout.
         Now he's tapping me on my arm. The more he taps, the more my hands jiggle and the more the horizon jumps up and down, up and down. I whisper back between gritted teeth, "Quit tapping my arm! I
    can't see a thing!"
         [and a few minutes later ...]

         Off came our snow shoes and we dropped to our knees, slowly creeping from one sagebrush to another. With every move, I came precariously close to breaking through the crust covered snow and falling flat on my face. To avoid an accident, I balanced  that rifle carefully across my arms and waddled forward, ever closer to the still grazing animals.
         "I can't believe they haven't heard us," I whispered.
         "We're upwind. They can't see you and it's hard to hear through the fog, so they'll probably smell you first."
         Fortunately, I didn't have time to over-think that last comment 'cause just then, their ears, eyes, or noses must have kicked in. Heads perked up and legs started moving. For such big animals, they sure can hop-to when they want to. A few careful shots and there was meat for the freezer. One tag filled and one left to go!

      [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Conservation Column: A Call to Arms

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    Conservation_art
    From the April issue of Field & Stream


    Call to Arms

    A new push to harvest energy resources could harm 42 million acres  of wild land by the end of the year, and only sportsmen can stop it. By Bob Marshall

    If there ever there was a time for sportsmen to make an impact, it is now. Hunters and anglers may be the nation’s last hope for stopping one of the largest public-land giveaways in history -- and a potential disaster for hunting and fishing in the West.

    The issue is the Bureau of Land Management’s rush to complete dozens of Resource Management Plans (RMPs) across the West before the Bush administration leaves office. It is one of the most important conservation stories of the decade because the future quality of hunting and fishing in large parts of a half dozen states hangs in the balance.

    RMPs are documents that establish how public lands managed by the BLM can be used. The process, which typically takes several years, allows for public comment at several steps along the way, including a 30-day period after the draft plan is published. Any person or group can recommend changes. While the agency must listen, it is under no legal obligation, however, to act on any requests. The final plan typically reflects the priorities of the administration.

    Once in place, an RMP has the force of law. And although an RMP can be changed by a new administration, that process can take several years, a period during which the old rules remain in effect. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Discussion Topic: On Buying and Selling Hunting Rights

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    Suppose you’re going to sell your 200 acre farm but want to keep the hunting rights on it. That shouldn’t be a problem, right? Actually, it’s a trickier issue than it may seem at first blush.

    From The Dickenson Press:

    During North Dakota’s 2007 legislative session, lawmakers placed a two-year moratorium on all property sales that would include retention of hunting rights so they could better study the issue. . . .

    [A] concern that was raised during testimony . . . was the possibility that anti-hunting groups would come in to buy land, then turn around and sell it while retaining the hunting rights.

    “We’re just trying to get ahead of the whole ballgame,” [state representative Lyle] Hanson said. “Say some big organization that is against hunting comes in. They could come in and buy and then sell it, but maintain the hunting rights.”

    Check out the full article and tell us what you think.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Bass Masters Meet The “Catcher-Man”-In-Chief

    3

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    Alton Jones, winner of the 2008 Bassmaster Classic, and Judy Wong, the Women’s Bassmaster Tour champ, went to the White House this week to meet President Bush, who said (from the Baltimore Sun):

    I thought it was important to welcome these champs here to the White House so that -- you know, to encourage people to fish . . . . There's nothing better than fishing.''

    "This is a good, clean sport,’’ Bush said. “It's a sport that requires good conservation in order to make sure our fisheries are good, and I love to welcome the champs here. And so we're glad you're here. The people of Louisiana and Texas are proud of you. . . .’’

    “I'm a good fisherman,’’ Bush said, [responding to an invite to fish with Wong] “Sometimes I'm a good catcher-man.’’ [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Kansas Rancher Shoots Mountain Lion

    8

    By Dave Hurteau & Chad Love

    According to The Wichita Eagle, state wildlife officials believe this is the first documented wild mountain lion in Kansas in more than 100 years.

    Check out the full story. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    Give Hillary a Medal

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    WANTED: CREATIVE THINKING
    You are all no doubt familiar with Hillary Clinton's discredited claim that she embarked at the Tuzla Air Base under sniper fire and had to run for it. I believe this points out the need for a medal for public persons who claim to have been in danger, and weren't. But we need a name for this decoration.

    An example: Some months ago there was a contest to name the Clinton's house in Chappaqua. The winner was, I believe, "Disgraceland." Now we need you all to kick the dung heaps of your minds and see what slithers out. I will pick a winner, if there is one, and accord him great glory on this very blog. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 26, 2008

    What to Do With Your Gift From George W. Bush

    By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

    Some time this year, most of us will be getting a check from the Federal government to make us feel better, spend foolishly, and keep us from sliding into a depression. (Since the government does not have this money, your children or their children will eventually have to pick up the tab, but that's not our problem, right?) If you are looking for something really nifty to spend it on, here is the Legend Sporter, made by D'Arcy Echols. Mr. Echols, of whom I have writ before, goes to extreme lengths to produce the best rifle possible, and the prices of his guns reflect this.

    Echols

    What is chiefly of interest here is D'Arcy's Legend Brochure, which lists everything he does and why he does it. You can read it by clicking on the link below. I think you will find it more than interesting. And, in case you're wondering, I do not own an Echols rifle, and he is not giving me one, but were he to do so, I would not have a fit of nobility and refuse it. [ Read Full Post ]

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