Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

TOP STORIES

  • Killer Frogs

    Frog baits can lose their potency over time if you keep using the same pattern. These 3 tweaks will turn on the bite.

  • Kayak Culture

    The second-largest kayak fishing tournament in the United States takes place in New York City. Here's what it's like.

  • What's Next

    We asked our experts to peer into the future of hunting, fishing, and conservation. Here’s what they see.

  • Best Reader Photos, March

    Check out the 25 best shots from our readers and submit your photos for the chance to win gear.

  • Bowfishing Gear

    The only required gear for bowfishing is a fish arrow tied to a line that’s tied to a bow. But good gear does make it more fun and productive. These items are definitely worth having.

  • The Real Fly Girls

    Meet seven women with the chops and attitude to infiltrate the industry boys' club and wade into the mainstream.

  • Bowfishing Rigs Test

    Don't trash your whitetail bow shooting carp, suckers, and gar. Get a dedicated bowfishing rig.

  • The Drone Report

    Some sportsmen have started using unmanned aircraft for hunting and fishing applications. But, where do we draw the fair-chase line?

  • Small-Stream Smallies

    If you live in bronzeback country, small streams could be your best chance at big fish. Here's how to target them.

 

Top Picks

  • March 20, 2014

    How to Teach a Kid to Turkey Hunt

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Photo: Wyatt Bradford Barrett, 8, Florida

    A couple of years ago, on a plane returning home from Texas, I sat next to a 7-year-old boy who had just added a Rio Grande to his Osceola, putting him halfway through his turkey Grand Slam. Whether a 7-year-old is mature enough to understand a Grand Slam—or even killing a turkey—is a question for another time. What’s undeniable is that many kids now get their introduction to hunting in the turkey woods.

    My generation started with .410s and squirrels, but we didn’t have any choice: There weren’t any turkeys. Now they’re everywhere, and most states hold youth seasons before the regular season. Many adults are more interested in turkey hunting than in small game anyway, and that’s how their kids learn the sport. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    Tired Of Ice Fishing? 4 Million Pounds Of Steel Will Open That Water Right Up

    3

    By Joe Cermele

    As many of you already know, the Great Lakes had a record amount of ice this year thanks to the extreme cold of this nasty winter. Well, the shipping industry has been sitting idle long enough. Time for the U.S. Coast Guard to step in. This video gives you a close-up view of how one of their cutters just obliterates ice that's five feet thick in some places, which sometimes requires the 4 million-pound ship to back up and go full-on ramming speed. Pretty wild. Why wait for spring when the Coasties can just make it for you?

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    Tactical Rifles

    By David E. Petzal

    When I was in the Army, I was once herded to a class on anti-tank weapons, during the course of which the instructor repeatedly used the phrase “neutralize the enemy.” Someone asked the sergeant what “neutralize” meant. The sergeant smiled a slow and beautiful smile and said: “You’ll blow the living s**t out of him.” 

    “Neutralize” was a euphemism, and so is “tactical.” A tactical rifle is a firearm designed for shooting people in a precise manner, as opposed to New York City Police Department doctrine, which is to empty the magazine as fast as you can in the general direction of everything standing and hope for the best. 

    If a gun company were to announce its new model so-and-so people-shooting rifle there would be hell to pay. So the easy way out is to simply call the gun a tactical rifle and everyone is happy. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    Hooded Vandal Dumps Elk Urine Into Car Ventilation

    4

    By Ben Romans

    A surveillance camera outside John Lindgren’s home in Portland, Ore., recently filmed a hooded person pouring elk urine into his car’s ventilation system, OregonLive.com reports.

    The vandal emptied two containers of frothy liquid at the base of the windshield. Lindgren, a manager for United Grain Corp., a wheat exporting company, wrote in a crime report that he believes he is being targeted by members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union because of his involvement in an ongoing labor dispute with them. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Shotgun Review: Franchi Aspire

    By Phil Bourjaily


    Photo courtesy of JJ Reich

    A shootable 28 gauge built on a true 28 gauge frame is a wonderful thing, and hard to find in the U.S. market, too. The discontinued Ruger Red Label 28 is one example. It was a great upland gun, but most 28s you see are built on 20 gauge frames.*

    Franchi’s Aspire O/U is a true 28. It’s built on the same action as the 12 and 20 gauge Franchi Instinct O/Us (also the same action used by a whole raft of Italian O/Us) but trimmed down to 28 gauge proportions. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Fat-Washing Whiskey is Apparently a Thing Now

    3

    By David Draper

    Forgive me if I’m late getting on to the fat-washing bandwagon, but it takes a little while for hip trends like skinny jeans, ironic mustaches, and greasy drinks to reach those of us who choose to live out here in the sticks. Maybe you’re like me and never heard the term “fat-washing” before today, so let me try to explain it to you. The process involves taking perfectly good liquor and mixing it with some type of fat. Rugged folks use things like pork fat and bacon, while more subtle tenders of the bar opt for the oils of olives, nuts, and seeds. The grease-slicked spirit is then placed in the freezer where the fat solidifies so it can be strained of skimmed off the top, leaving behind a spirit infused with another layer of flavor. For a more detailed explanation of the process, check out this recipe for venison-fat infused whiskey over at Foodbeast. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    California Drought: Salmon Stocks Might Get Shipped to Sea

    1

    By David Draper

    As it’s been said, desperate times call for desperate measures. The ongoing drought in California has made conditions beyond desperate for salmon stocks (as well as plenty of other fish and game). As a result, hatchery managers there are planning to give salmon smolts a lift by transferring them via water trucks to the ocean if water levels in the Sacramento River drop below a pre-determined level, the Sacramento Bee reports:

    “[S]tate and federal wildlife officials announced a plan to move hatchery-raised salmon by truck in the event the state’s ongoing drought makes the Sacramento River and its tributaries inhospitable for the fish. They fear the rivers could become too shallow and warm to sustain salmon trying to migrate to sea on their own. Shrunken habitat could deplete food supply for the young fish, and make them easier prey for predators. It also would make the water warmer, which can be lethal to salmon. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Is It Bait Or Alien Spawn From A Far-Away Galaxy?

    By Joe Cermele

    A German lure maker called Fresh Bait recently posted a video about their new biodegradable, edible soft-plastic lures made purely from an organic, protein-rich gelatin. I was going to post that video, but then I found this one. The same company sells kits to make these maggot-filled gel balls. They're intended for carp, but I bet a bruiser brown or steelhead would slurp one up faster than my dog lunges for a fallen Dorito crumb. On another note, is that not the creepiest, most alien-like bait you've ever seen? Looks like something Ellen Ripley would have torched with a flame thrower.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Whitetails By the Numbers: A Snapshot of Our Sport

    By Scott Bestul

    As some of you know, I attended the inaugural QDMA Whitetail Summit early this month at Big Cedar Lodge outside Branson, Missouri. I listened to an all-star lineup of speakers, who presented a dizzying amount of information about deer. To be honest, I’m still digesting it all. 

    In the meantime, while going through my notes, I jotted down a bunch of facts and figures that jumped out at me. Compiled from different lectures spread across three days of meetings, some of these numbers are positive, some are just puzzling, and several are downright troubling. Together, they reveal an interesting snapshot of the state of whitetail hunting today. Here they are: 

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Video: The Ultimate Turkey Hunting Bike

    0

    By Will Brantley

    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read to “take a mountain bike turkey hunting.” It’s a great idea in theory that rarely pans out in real life, due largely to the limitations of the bike itself. 

    The tires on a typical bike are too skinny to maintain balance at slow speed, much less get traction on a sloppy springtime trail. There’s nowhere really good to carry your gun or bow, and riding while wearing a turkey vest is difficult. Most mountain bikes are painted in gaudy colors, too. That’s OK if you’re a spandex-wearing granola cruncher (or just riding for fun), but turkeys do not like bright, shiny things. Usually, you’re just as well off to walk. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Suckers: Fishing for Spring’s Most Overlooked Species

    3

    By M.D. Johnson


    Photo by Bill Lindner

    Suckers are a spring thing. As water temps rise into the 50s, the fish begin their spawning runs into shallow tributary streams. Here, males scoop out rudimentary nests and await the females. Both white and redhorse suckers will measure up to 24 inches and weigh from 1 to 4 pounds. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    How to Get Your Dog in Hunting Shape During the Off-Season

    1

    By Slaton L. White


    Photo by Bill Buckley

    Though waterfowl season is months away, you need to think now about a training regimen for your dog. As a diehard waterfowler, Total Outdoorsman Challenge competitor Scot Marcin knows all about keeping a retriever in shape. “You’re asking the dog to sit with you in a blind when it’s 20 degrees and jump into icy water to retrieve. He’s got to be in shape to do that,” Marcin says. Here are tips designed to ensure your dog is ready to hunt when you are. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    A Run-and-Gun Turkey Hunt Through the Nebraska Sandhills

    1

    By T. Edward Nickens

                      Photos by: Dusan Smetana

    We were trapped, caught between the cedar-choked ravine we’d just clawed up and a huge sweep of grassy meadow a bobcat could barely slink through. No way this was going to work, I thought.

    “Go! Go!” I hissed. “We gotta get in front of these birds!”

    And just like that, Nathan Borowski was gone. He didn’t hesitate a second—just gripped his shotgun like a firehouse pole and dropped down the face of the ridge luge-style, feet first and streamlined. As he slid under a scary latticework of cedar limbs, my mouth hung open. Then his buddy, Wes Remmer, followed suit and hurtled down the slope from zero to man-that-has-to-hurt in two seconds flat. A contrail of pine needles and Nebraska dust marked their free fall—that and the sound of cracking limbs. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    Float the Colorado River from Home via Google Street View

    1

    By Tim Romano

    Last week Google and American Rivers announced a partnership that brings Google's "Street View" to a river. Specifically, they're working on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. For the first time ever you can ride through all 286 miles of the chasm in 360-degree photo spheres without leaving your house.

    While part of me hates this, I understand what a powerful tool it is. How many of us are ever going to raft down the entire length of the one of the most amazing canyons in the world? I would guess a small percentage. It's certainly at the top of my bucket list, but until then you can bet I'll be taking a tour of the rapids and my future camp sites via Google. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    Awesome Deer Stand Photos From Wisconsin

    4

    By Ben Romans


    Photo by Jason Vaughn

    Photographer Jason Vaughn didn’t grow up with much hunting experience. So when he moved to Wisconsin and saw deer blinds in rural for the first time, he was captivated by their beauty and wanted to learn more about them. That interest has transformed into his “Hide” series, a project chronicling the setting and history behind Wisconsin’s hunting tradition, Slate.com reports.
     
    Vaughn would drive around the state looking for blinds to photograph. During the process of seeking permission from the owner, he’d usually learn something unique about a stand’s construction or history — many are handmade and passed down among family generations. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    Florida Angler Catches Possible World-Record Pacific Snook

    0

    By Ben Romans

    A Florida man caught a pending world-record 60-pound Pacific snook in Costa Rica two weeks ago.
     
    According to FloridaToday.com, Ward Michaels, a fishing guide from Orlando, Fla., has traveled to both coasts of Costa Rica more than 80 times in the last 27 years to target snook. He planned his latest trip around March’s new moon, knowing the chances of catching big, spawning females were high.
     
    “The new moons in March and April are when the big females stage off the beaches before they move into the rivers to spawn,” said Michaels. “Each time, everything happens in three days.” [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    Rifles: How Temperature Affects Load Accuracy

    By David E. Petzal

    Before we get to the real subject of this post, permit me to discuss life on other planets. According to informed sources, the number of these bodies in the universe is 10 to the 24th power, which reads 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. Given the immensity of this figure there is surely life of some kind out there, perhaps quite a bit of it. And no matter what form it may take, or how alien it may be to us, none of it can possibly be more horrible than Chris Matthews. Thanks for bearing with me.

    One of the factors that is not given enough credit for making the life of the rifle shooter a living hell is the effect of temperature on the rate at which powder burns, and therefore on accuracy. I got a good taste of this last week when I went to the range with Old Sure Thing, my impeccably precise .30/06.

     I was shooting a load which I had worked up last summer (you do remember summer?) involving a hot charge of IMR 4831. I remembered it as being very accurate, but the groups that showed up were not. Originally, it would put five rounds in .602, but a few days ago I was hard pressed to keep three shots inside 1.5 inches. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 18, 2014

    One Feisty Reef Shark. One Scared Spearfisherman

    3

    By Joe Cermele

    Part of the reason why I have little to no interest in spearfishing is exemplified in this video. Diver Jason Dimitri was just minding his own business, removing invasive lion fish from the reefs of the Caribbean, when suddley the whole thing goes sour thanks to a reef shark full of pee and vinegar. And just when you think the little bugger is done, he comes back at Dimitri again...hard and fast. Per the full story on The Province, Dimitri "bears the shark no ill will." Though I'm sure the shark at least owes him $20 for the soiled bathing suit he probably had to throw out.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    Wild Game Recipe: 7 Secrets to the Best Corned Beef Hash Ever

    2

    By David Draper

    It’s hard to say which I like better: a big meal of corned beef, potatoes and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day, or that day-after cure of corned beef hash and eggs. Both are among my favorite meals of the year, but only the latter has the ability to put a high point on what is normally a rough morning. But there’s more to corned beef hash than mixing together meat and potatoes and frying it in a hot skillet. Here are seven of my hard-won secrets to creating the best corned beef hash you’ve ever tasted.

    You can also make a great St. Patrick’s Day (or anytime of year) meal by substituting venison roast or even goose breasts for beef brisket when making corned beef. You can find my recipe for corned goose here. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    Use A Compass To Catch More Early Spring Bass

    6

    By Dave Wolak

    When you’ve been cooped up all winter, it’s very easy to get on the water for that first run of these season and start pounding the first bank or piece of structure that looks good. Let me tell you, looks can be deceiving. Remember that this time of year, bass are starting to move shallow, and good shallow-water bass anglers are always hunting for those skinny areas that yield both size and numbers. The best of them have a knack of finding those spots that seems to be constantly replenishing themselves with fresh bass. Though honing this skill can take years, there is one common factor shared by their hot spots more often than not, and figuring it out simply requires a compass.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    ATV Maintenance: Why You Should Always Have a Factory Service Manual

    0

    By Peter B. Mathiesen

    One of the most disappointing and irritating moments in ATV ownership is when your machine decides that it’s just not coming out to play.

    Although most of today’s ATVs and UTVs can come to life after sitting for long periods of time with little more than a battery charge, it’s not always that easy. Older machines, in particular, can be fussy when it comes to fuel and will need more TLC to get back in the game after winter storage.

    Any form of maintenance should always refer to the manufacturer’s specs. Unfortunately, these are often not readily found on the web. While there are numerous helpful forums and online sites to look through when a problem does arise, most owners I know lack the single most helpful tool to keep their wheels turning: a factory service manual. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    10 Reasons Why Every Fly Angler Should Fish Ireland Someday

    4

    By Kirk Deeter

    Sláinte! Happy St. Patrick's Day to the Fly Talk nation!

    This is a special holiday for me, partly because I am of Irish descent (on my mother's side), and also because it gives good cause to tilt a pint or two and remember one of the best fishing trips I have ever taken. I spent a week in Ireland a few years back, playing golf and fishing with my good friend Chris Santella, author of the "Fifty Places to Fly Fish Before You Die" books. Ireland was tops on his list, and it is now also tops on mine.  We didn't catch a ton of fish that week, mind you, but I'd go back tomorrow. And next month, and the month after that, if I could. The fishing in Ireland interests me almost more than anywhere else. And the more you fish, the more you realize there are many factors that make a "lifetime" trip.

    Here are my 10 reasons why Ireland should be on any serious fly angler's list of dream destinations: [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    Extreme Winter Hurts Great Lakes Duck Population

    By David Draper


    CC image from Wikipedia

    The long winter in the northern half of the U.S. has been hard on everything, including resident populations of waterfowl that rely on fish for a substantial portion of their diet — fish that are now locked beneath a historical amount of ice on the Great Lakes and other area waters. Along the Niagara River in New York, red-breasted mergansers seem to be the species suffering most from starvation, though scaup, canvasbacks and grebes have also likely been affected, the Associated Press reports:

    Biologists say carcasses began piling up by the hundreds in early January after the plunging temperatures started icing over nearly the entire Great Lakes, preventing the ducks from getting to the minnows that are their main source of food. Necropsies on dozens of birds have confirmed the cause: starvation. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 14, 2014

    How to Call In a Gobbler ... with a Nail

    0

    By Dave Hurteau

    Not only can it be done, but there are two ways to do it: 1) You can hold a nail in your off hand, or put it in your pocket, while you call in a turkey with a turkey call; 2) you can use the nail, along with a block of wood and a piece of slate, to make turkey sounds that lure in your tom.

    Doug Herman with Cottonwood Hunting Lodge in Nebraska does it the second way. In fact, when we asked Herman, in the April feature story "Turkey Freaks," what call he would use if he could only use one, he said: "Actually, 95 percent of my calling is from one call—a nail call I’ve used for years to mimic clucks, purrs, yelps, cutts, even kee kees. The striker is a horseshoe nail you work against a chunk of slate. You’d swear you were hearing a real turkey." [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 14, 2014

    Smoking Snow Geese with Wild Sky Seasonings

    2

    By David Draper

    I’ve been on a few snow goose hunts over the last couple of weeks and invariably, when I bring this up in casual conversation, someone asks, “What in the hell do you do with all those things?” First off, as an aspiring snow goose hunter, you have to manage your expectations. Sure, there are occasions when you can kill 100 or even 200 geese, but more often not, a day of hunting yields numbers well south of the century mark. Still, even 30 or 40 snows are a lot to deal with. The meat can be a bit challenging to work with, especially when the average age of a snow is 10 years, with birds upwards of 20 years old not uncommon. [ Read Full Post ]

bmxbiz-fs