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Bass Fishing

  • August 20, 2013

    Now Is The Time To Spoon-Feed Big Bass

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    By Dave Wolak

    Dropping a heavy metal spoon directly below the boat is a perfectly acceptable technique for jigging up saltwater species or perhaps Great Lakes trout, salmon, and walleye. It might seem like such a simplistic method of catching fish doesn’t have a place in today’s high-tech, fast-paced world of bass fishing, right? Truth is, that’s just not the case. You can’t argue with the effectiveness of a spoon; heck, they even include them in survival kits. Believe it or not, I have seen quite a re-emergence of spoon use in the modern-day bass fishing arena, but just like any other lure, you have to understand where and when to put them into play.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 12, 2013

    The Bass-Baseball Connection: Would You Be Scouted For The Majors?

    By Dave Wolak

    Baseball is often called America's favorite pastime, and being a big fan of pro and college ball, I don’t necessarily disagree. But I’m going to go ahead and say bass fishing may hold down a close second, and the two are kind of similar. Both baseball and bass fishing are long, drawn-out games that can seem boring to lay people. Maybe they'll watch the action-packed moments that make the highlight reels. If you're intimately involved in either sport, however, you may be more impressed with the skill or decision-making that lead to a quick snippet in a highlight reel. In baseball, a great overall player is measured by the 5 predominant tools he possesses, which include hitting for average, hitting for power, overall speed on the bases, fielding prowess, and arm strength when throwing. In bass fishing, I have never really seen 5 performance tools laid out, so here’s what I came up with based on my experience and “scouting” other great anglers. What are your strengths, and where do you need improvement?

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 7, 2013

    Fishing App Review: Perfect Your Casting Rhythm with FlyCaster

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    By Tim Romano

    I've seen and tried several fly fishing apps on my phone just because they exist and seem like a fun thing to do for a few minutes. Most of them revolve around catching fish, and honestly aren't very good. A new app called FlyCaster wants help you get your casting rhythm down instead of catching fish. After a few days of playing with it, I have to say it's pretty damn accurate — and fun.

    The app lets you hone casts on famous rivers like the Madison River, Klamath River, and Yellow Breeches Creek with three different rod setups: 3-weight, 5-weight, and 8-weight.
     
    You can fish up to three spots on each river. You can practice casting strokes with the metronome beat on the 10 o’ clock to 2 o’ clock marks with a chime that signifies when you nail a perfect stroke. The better the cast, the bigger the fish.

    More importantly, you can also check casting biomechanics while you fish. Or review your stroke synch rates for the month and year, change rods any time, and choose either right-hand or left-hand rod setups. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 5, 2013

    Twin Brothers Start Program to Trade Games for Fishing Gear

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    By Tim Romano

    Strolling the isles of the Outdoor Retailer trade show last week, I stopped to see the good folks at the Orvis booth and say hello. Almost immediately I was introduced to two young brothers around 15 or 16 years old named A.J. and Jace Garcia. They were in the booth talking to people, playing with gear and generally just having a good time. Turns out AJ and Jace are twin brothers that fish, hunt, and love being outdoors. They love it so much they started a program called Twin Territory at local sports shows and around their state home state of Utah to try to get kids off the couch and into the outdoors any way they can. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 5, 2013

    A "Grown Up" Approach To Wading For Small-Stream Bass

    By Dave Wolak

    When you tell someone you’re a bass pro, they automatically think of you flying across a big lake somewhere on a fast boat. Granted, that might be how I primarily bass fish these days, but I never forget where I started. I grew up in Pennsylvania, and if you asked mini me where I was headed on an average summer day, the answer would have been the Susquehanna River, Delaware River or one of their tributaries. I loved wading in old swim trunks, carrying one spinning rod and fanny pack holding a few key lures. It was simplistic and effective summer bass fishing, and I still do it today whenever I get the chance. Now I live in NC, and many of the rivers and streams around here are plentiful with largemouth. Or I can head west to the mountains where more smallmouths take up river residence.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 1, 2013

    Quick Look: Switch Sunglasses Magnetic Interchange Lens System

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    By Kirk Deeter

    Tim Romano and I are cruising around the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market trade show in Salt Lake City at the moment. This show is unreal—everything "outdoors" is under one roof, from hiking boots to stand-up paddle boards to backpacks to fishing gear.  We, of course, are locked on fly-fishing products, and there is definitely more fly-fishing flavor at this year's event than there has been before. I'm trying to uncover some products that may be a bit out of the mainstream fly shop but no less worthy for the typical angler/consumer. My first contender comes in the form of an eyeglass company called Switch. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 31, 2013

    Working On The (Summer) Night Moves

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    By Joe Cermele

    While I can't speak for the rest of the country, here in the Northeast we're being treated to a delightful summer cool-down. The humidity has dropped out, the temps aren't climbing much above 80, and we haven't been plagued by rain. That means the local rivers are looking good, and the lack of heat has kicked on the local smallie action. That's terrific, because one of my favorite things to do this time of year is float the Delaware for bass in the dark. You don't always hammer them, but for whatever reason, I think a topwater smash you only hear is a bit more exciting than one you see at noon.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 29, 2013

    Five Tips for Catching Bass on the Fly

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    By Tim Romano


    The fish above was caught last week in upstate New York on Raquette Lake inside the 6.1 million acre Adirondack Park. I spent the better part of two weeks up there with my family on vacation and absolutely hammered both largemouths and smallies on spinning and fly gear. While I had the chance to fish for rainbow trout, landlocked salmon, and brook trout, I concentrated my efforts on both large and smallmouth bass as that seemed the right thing to do this time of year up there. Plus it's a hell of a lot of fun. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 29, 2013

    Striper Angler Sues IGFA Because He Missed Out On $1M Mustad Prize

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    By Ben Romans

    Rodney Ply, seen here with his 68-pound striper, is suing the IGFA.

    Last week, Rodney Ply of Diamond City, Arkansas, filed a lawsuit against the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) over its rejection of his 68-pound striped bass.  

    Ply caught the fish on February 18, 2012 on a homemade spinnerbait, but after reviewing his submission, the IGFA denied his entry claiming the lure was a spreader bar, a lure that emulates a school of fish, which is illegal under the agency’s rules.  

    The proverbial salt in the wound is Ply pre-registered for Mustad’s Hook A Million Contest—a competition promoted by the company that offered a $1 million prize to anyone that could catch a new, certified, world record fish in one of 13 categories. Without the IGFA’s blessing, Ply couldn’t enter his catch in the contest. Ultimately, Guy Yocom’s record tuna won the jackpot. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 29, 2013

    Every Good Bass Fisherman Has A Mentor. Who's Yours?

    By Dave Wolak

    If there is one common thread I’ve noticed among good bass fishermen, it’s that most of them can credit a solid chunk of their drive and knowledge to a mentor that, at some point, provided the stepping stones for success on the water. What I’m not talking about is someone giving up secret lures or locations. Too many people consider those that spit out that kind of info mentors, especially in the tournament world. For example, let’s say your friend Charlie insists you fish a spot only because a past tourney winner caught fish in that location. Some never get past that mindset. A good mentor would get you focused not on exactly what lure or where, but what kind of structure was in the area where the guy won. What was the overall pattern that day? Was it overcast? Sunny? Then a good mentor will teach you how to apply that knowledge to finding your own fish and catching them your way instead of being a follower. Not everyone has it in them to be a good teacher and mentor, and on the flip side, not everyone recognizes when they are being given a piece of sage advice.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 26, 2013

    Beat The Heat by Fishing After Dark

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    By T. Edward Nickens

    Creatures of all sorts come out at dark—including fish-crazed anglers hoping for a break in the heat and chances at monster trout, bass, cats, and more.

    Since neither of us could drive, my buddy Vernon Hedgecock and I would walk to Oak Hollow Lake, jump the gate, and fish from a dock’s dark end where the security lights didn’t reach. Many a night I lay there half asleep with one eye cracked open for a patrol car and the fishing line between my toes so I would wake up with the bite. I cut my fishing teeth in the darkest hours of the night, and I still love to pound a lake or creek when it’s just me, the bats, and a few bellowing bullfrogs. I love wading in the dark. I love the scary feel of the canoe bumping some unseen log. DEET in my nostrils brings back delicious memories. Some from years gone by. Some from just last week.

    August is the time to roll out when the sun goes down. It’s the time to find a whitefly hatch on a bronzeback river and work popping bugs in the black dark. It’s the time to lob big, nasty streamers into big, nasty logjams where big, nasty brown trout prowl. It’s the time to work a Jitterbug over every square inch of a 2-acre farm pond—its gluk-gluk-glukking the soundtrack of a summer childhood. Few things can beat sunrise on the water. One of them is moonlight. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 26, 2013

    Use a Float Tube to Sneak Up on Fish

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    By Kirk Deeter

    A float tube or a kick boat offers great stealth advantages when you’re fishing lakes for pike, bass, panfish, or trout. No motor vibration. No clunking around. And because you’re sitting closer to the surface, your lower profile allows you to sneak in tight without casting shadows over the fish.


    These advantages are negated, however, by too much splashing and kicking, or when your casts miss the zone because of a sloppy presentation. The trick is to plan a route of attack, move into position, and then let natural elements like currents, wind, and the sun work for you. Just like this. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 22, 2013

    How To Combat Sudden Water Rises From Summer Storms

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    By Dave Wolak

    Did you ever show up at the lake in mid-summer after a few nights of passing storms and the water is up way beyond levels you are used to fishing this time of year? It just happened to me not long ago on a lake close to home. Mid-summer is usually a pretty stable time of the year to bass fish. Spring rains subside and the fish get past their rapidly changing springtime spawn cycle, consequently developing more of a groove in their daily habits. Many anglers also develop a groove to intercept those summer bass doing both the traditional deep and shallow routines. But a good angler has to be willing to pull a 180 from the conventional when summer storms rapidly change the conditions. If you see a sudden rise in water during the summer, here’s what to do.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 18, 2013

    Slip Bobbers Work Great for Fly Fishing

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    By Tim Romano

    The last couple summers I've been spending a day or two with friend and superb high altitude lake guide John Perizzolo, chasing big trout on the lakes here in Colorado, our home state, with fly rods. John guides for Breckenridge Outfitters and manufactures JP's Nymping Mud as a side business. He is especially adept at figuring out the picky trout that reside in our high altitude impoundments.

    Occasionally we'll resort to 25-foot leaders with three-fly rigs. In these instances a slip bobber is invaluable for landing fish and an almost must have. In this video John demonstrates how and why a slip bobber is so effective on a fly rod in certain situations like this.