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Fly Fishing

20 Secrets To Help You Catch Fish All Summer Long

These 20 fishing secrets will help you catch trout, bass, bluegills, cats, walleyes, and...
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Fishing and Hunting Tips from the Ultimate "Cast and Blast"

This January Field & Stream editor-at-large Kirk Deeter and photographer Tim Romano...
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  • January 30, 2008

    The Disappearance of Stanley Bain

    1

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    -By Will Rice

    "There was no evidence to show they’d been around. There were no boats,
    no wreckage. There was nothing." - Henry Bain. Andros Island, Bahamas

    Stanley_bain_boat_3On the morning of August 5, 1995, Stanley Bain stood in front of his
    Cargill Creek Lodge and surveyed the small flyfishing empire that he’d
    built. The resort sat near the North Bight on South Andros Island, The
    Bahamas, concealed among lush tropical gardens and manicured lawns.
    Three satellite cottages peppered the outskirts of his property, which
    included an in-ground swimming pool and a Cessna 402 for his more
    affluent clients who wished to arrive via private charter. And
    surrounding it all were some of the most productive bonefishing waters
    in the world.

    Stanley was preparing for a two-week fishing trip to harvest
    lobsters for the coming year’s clients. A recent hurricane had just
    passed and he and his brother William were getting a late start on
    opening season. But soon after fueling up the 36-foot Luhrs Sport
    Fisherman and two Dolphin skiffs that would accompany them, Stanley,
    William, and three lodge employees set out into the emerald waters
    surrounding Andros. As they headed away from Cargill Creek, the group
    passed Simon Bain, another of Stanley’s brothers, who was returning
    with a client from the North Bight and Moxey Creek after a morning
    chasing big bonefish. Simon ran his boat close in front of his older
    brother’s cabin cruiser, and he can still remember his two brothers
    laughing as he passed. It was the last time he would ever see them.
    Stanley Bain and his crew of four disappeared that day forever.

    To continue Will Rice's, The Disappearance of Stanley Bain click here and finish reading at The Drake Magazine. It's not that long.  Go get a fresh cup of coffee, take your ten minute break and enjoy a good mystery story.

    TR

      [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 29, 2008

    Mako Chomps Angler

    3

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    This just in, from the AP in Australia:

    A mako shark attacked a fisherman on his boat deck, biting him on the leg after the man reeled it in while fishing off Australia's east coast Sunday, an official said. The 20-year-old deckhand was airlifted by helicopter rescue, said Brian Russell, a spokesman for the rescue service. He was flown to the Gold Coast Hospital where his condition was reported as stable before he underwent surgery. The man had been fishing for tuna when he reeled in a 3-meter (10-foot), 90 kilogram (200 pound) mako shark and landed it on the deck.

    "He stepped on its tail and it whipped around and latched on to his tight calf, biting through to the bone," Russell said. "The shark had his leg clamped in its jaws for several minutes until other deckhands cut its head off." Paramedic Darrin Hatchman said the victim was lucky to be alive because the bite narrowly missed major arteries.

    You paying attention to this Conway Bowman? For more graphic warning
    click here
    Just don't do it while you're eating.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 28, 2008

    Winter Fishing Blues

    1

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Greenmt01_08_2Does anyone else have the winter fishing blues?

    Every year around this time I decide I've had enough of it, I absolutely have to get out and fish. Every year I come to the conclusion that it's usually a bad decision.

    It always sounds like such a good idea the night before... Yeah, it'll be great! We'll get up early, drive for two hours, rig up as fast as humanly possible (so as not to get frostbite), slog through three feet of snow to the quarter mile of tailwater that's open for fishing. After we get to said spot we realizie the sun will never make a full appearance in our little spot of canyon and curse ourselves repeatedly. After an hour of catching nothing but bottom, rigging and re-rigging a solo fisherman with a pipe wanders past. Of course we make the mistake of asking him how his fishing is. "Managed a few", he says. He also mutters this same sentence a hour later as he wanders back through our spot.

    Time to go.

    We've had it. Time to take off our ten layers, get back in the car and drive. Of course, it's sunday and ski traffic is at a standstill. What should have taken two hours takes three and a half getting home.

    I got skunked yesterday and I'm bitter. All I wanted was one fish. I didn't want to ski, snowshoe, icefish, or watch TV. I just wanted one fish on my fly rod. I know Deeter hung up the waders months ago. Maybe I should have listened when he said he was done...

    I'm done until March, when the blue wings start hatching and the temps warm up. Or so I say...

    TR [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 25, 2008

    Music to Fish By

    1

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    PLEASE HIT PLAY BEFORE READING

    Nothing like that feeling of jumping in the truck in the morning with a mug of coffee and a donut, and heading off for the water to fish. But what makes that moment really work is picking the right song to blare through the stereo as you roll. Can't be just one song ... the music has to match the mood, and more importantly, the type of fishing you're setting off to do. My picks:

    Bass ... "Five Pound Bass" by Robert Earl Keen. (What else?)
    Trout in the back country ... "Splendid Isolation" by Warren Zevon.
    Tarpon ... "It's a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock 'n Roll) by AC/DC (Just try it.)
    Mako Sharks ... "The End" by the Doors.
    Stripers ... "Fairytale of New York" by the Pogues.
    Carp ... "Chocktaw Bingo" by James McMurtry.
    Redfish ... "Essence" by Lucinda Williams.
    Steelhead ... "In Bloom" by Nirvana.

    And when you know you're in for that epic, blanket hatch on the trout river ...
    Anything by Barry White, because that's all about love, baby.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 24, 2008

    Tie or Buy?

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    I like tying flies. Except for when I have feathers flying up my nose, fingers covered with glue crust, and miscellaneous animal parts littering my desk. Which is most of the time. Sure, I get the creativity, the history, the cultural attachment. It's very cool to catch a fish on your own fly. I wish I could be John Barr, or even Dan-Bob. But I'm not. So I've decided to focus my efforts on 10 patterns, and buy the rest, because for $2 I'm more than willing to yield to the talents of the good people in Thailand or Sri Lanka.

    The 10: 1) Woolly bugger, 2) Pheasant tail, 3) Parachute Adams (transpose materials to make BWOs and PMDs); 4) Joe's Hopper; 5) Elk Hair Caddis; 6) Muddler minnow (for reasons previously explained); 7) Prince nymph; 8) Stonefly nymph; 9) RS2; and 10) San Juan Worm (because it is a crime to pay more than a nickel for a fly that takes 23 seconds to tie). What am I missing?

    I think I'll put the cap back on my head cement now.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 24, 2008

    Evan V ... Fish Wizard

    7

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    We've found another candidate to extract loose bills from Romano ... Evan V, who correctly answered muddler minnow as "Most Versatile Fly in the World," if only because woolly bugger was taken. Woolly bugger was a great call, but I gave you hints vis a vis the weather conditions and the season. Fall is not only streamer time, it's hopper time, and the muddler is not only a great streamer pattern for those cool mornings, but I cannot estimate the number of fish that old standard has caught when greased up and drifted like a dry hopper. Dead drifting muddlers below the surface is also a killer tactic; sometimes those bigger fish like to key on drowned hoppers. Give it a try sometime.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 24, 2008

    The Largest Trout In The World

    5

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter






    One more reason to get off your duff and see the Fly Fishing Film Tour this winter. The new film from the AEG group looks like they've amped up their production level and have a movie with more than just fish porn this time. The new flick has the group traveling to Mongolia to catch the infamous taimen. A fish that they claim can live to 50 years and eats small puppies... Watch the trailer and try not to get jealous that it's January and you're watching this from a 5 X 5 cubical. It'll be spring soon...I promise.

    TR [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 23, 2008

    The Most Versatile Fly in the World

    1

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Okay ... Most of you got the last quiz answer. (Amy and Kim were on opposite banks, one was staring into the sun's glare.) Let's try something a bit more subjective ... see if you can land on what I think is the most versatile fly pattern in the world ...

    Kirk and Tim were fishing on the Colorado River by Glenwood Springs in September. They made a $20 bet on who would catch more fish, using only one fly. It was a typical early fall Colorado day ... in the 30s in the morning; up to the mid 60s by midday. It was breezy, partly cloudy, and the water was pretty clear, but not terribly low. Both anglers were using 5-weight rods, with 4X leaders, and 4X tippets. They agreed to adjust weight, use strike indicators, whatever ... but they had to stick with the same fly pattern. At day's end, as Kirk snatched the Andrew Jackson bill from Tim (having caught 20 more fish that day), he spilled the beans and showed his friend the "secret pattern." Tim couldn't believe it ... here he had been fishing a Prince nymph all day (not a bad call for all-around conditions), but Kirk was using one of the oldest tricks in the flyfishing book. What was it, and why did it work?

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 22, 2008

    Because We Could

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    "Wow, check out that fish!" part 2 ... April with another mondo B.C. steelhead ...

    Aprils_40inchbuck

    If any of you bass boys doubt the beauty of steelhead fishing, go ahead and say so.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 22, 2008

    Interchangeable Polarized Lenses

    5

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Smith Optics has finally mastered the interchangeable sunglass concept. Manufacturers have tried to do it in the past, but the the Interlock is the first system I've seen that stands up to abuse and holds the lenses firmly in place. All you do is twist the ear stems, which opens the entire frame, and pop out the lenses. It's the perfect pair of glasses for ripping back across a flat near dusk or cruising home on a bug laden evening from your local stream or lake on a bike. You can also switch out the polarized lenses for a pair of clear ones. Smith offers a wide variety of styles and lenses. Check them out here.

    TR [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 21, 2008

    Another Riddle ... Are You Game?

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Kim and Amy were fishing a trout stream on a bright afternoon. Both have 20/20 vision. Both are wearing polarized glasses. Kim yelled to Amy, "Hey check out that big fish behind the rock in that run!" But Amy couldn't see it. "No it's right there ..." Kim said. Amy saw nothing, even though she was standing 20 feet from the fish. "Here, I'll show you," said Kim. She made one cast, and caught the fish, right in front of Amy. Why didn't Amy see the fish?

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 21, 2008

    Quiz Answer: How to Cast with Either Hand

    0

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    And the Answer is ... Will told Nate to hold the reel with his dominant (right) hand while casting. This adds a sense of balance and timing when you switch to your “off hand.” It's added proof for the notion that casting is more about timing and coordination than it is about power. You can transfer that balance and timing from your comfortable/dominant hand to your off hand, simply by cupping the reel with your dominant hand. Even if your shoulder is hurt, you can make short casts, in close, by keeping the rod close to your body, making very compact strokes ... and you can cup the reel without moving that hurt arm above the elbow. By simply holding the reel low and close to his body, Nate never had to lift his sore shoulder.

    Try this exercise ... you'll be surprised how well it works.

    Deeter [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 18, 2008

    Wow! Check out that fish!

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Aprilsteel

    Caught by April, Thompson River, British
    Columbia.

    TR [ Read Full Post ]

  • January 17, 2008

    Take the Trout Quiz!

    2

    By Tim Romano & Kirk Deeter

    Okay, let's see how smart you folks really are. Five questions in five days. While we have answers, which we'll print when we post the next questions, we want to hear your thoughts ... This is, after all flyfishing, and few answers are ever set in stone. KD

    1. Nate, who is right-handed, hurt his right shoulder three days before a planned fishing vacation. He desperately wanted go, but figured he had to learn how to cast left-handed, or else he wouldn't be able to cast at all. He simply couldn't lift his right hand above his shoulder. So he found himself flailing away in Central Park, trying to teach himself to cast with his left arm, frustrated. He was about to throw in the towel, when up walked his buddy, Will. Nate explained the dire circumstances. "No problem, try this," Will said. Offering only one tip that required Nate to make only one body adjustment (and causing Nate no pain), Will had Nate throwing consistent accurate loops with his left hand (though at a shorter distance than he normally could with his dominant hand ... still plenty far and accurate for catching trout on that upcoming trip). What did Will tell Nate to do and why did it work? [ Read Full Post ]

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