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The Firing Line

.410 shotguns

Uploaded on October 23, 2011

Do they still make .410 shotguns? If so, who makes a good one?

Top Rated
All Replies
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

What would you use it for?..hunting what?

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from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

There are a number of companies still making the .410 . H&R,Mossberg,Remington,Saiga,Benelli,Baretta,Rossi,NEF and I am sure there are more that I can't think of right now. People still use them for kids,home defense,skeet,squirel hunting,rabbits, deer and so on. It is not a toy like many would have you believe. It takes some skill to shoot skeet with one of these little guns. I use mine for squirels,rabbits,skeet and with the help of a custom made HBBS, deer hunting. And yes,it will take deer,hog or black bear pretty easy out to and exceeding 100 yards or more. Only draw back is the cost of shells for it. But ammo is getting expensive for everything now any way you look at it. $3 a shoot

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

The guy can't even answer the question as to what he'd use it for.

-6 Good Comment? | | Report
from shazam wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Grouse. A friend of mine filled his quota with a .410 break action single shot last weekend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Would apply to grouse at short range, maybe sitting in a tree. Not enough shot to sportingly shoot bigger game birds at normal distances...say 30 yrds. and out....like pheasants for instance.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I guess I'm starting into my second childhood. I wanted a .410 when I was a kid and dad refused, said a .410 is an expert's gun and instead started me with a 20. He was a lot smarter than I gave him credit for in those days. These days I'm thinking a .410 of some sort, preferrably a pump or SxS, would be a nice little companion for the squirrel woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

deerhunter listed a lot of mfger's that make 410's, but the first one I looked up, Benelli, didn't show any 410's that they made...not even any 16 ga's. Depends on sales, and sales don't merit many 410's sold..maybe to a skeet shooter that wants to shoot in that classification. But as light as they make shotguns today, a 20 ga. gives you a wide range of shot shells at decent prices instead of the high priced 410 shells, and you can hunt all the game birds with a very light wt. gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

If your looking for an all purpose shotgun it's not the best choice. Limitations you betcha loads of fun are without a doubt. While new gun sales aren't over the top the used gun market is huge. The main reason for this is that older guys like me that grew up with these "bunny guns" as we used to call them are looking for the guns they grew up with such as the Ithaca model 66 or the Winchester model 21 which are no longer in production. I've seen guys pay 3 or 4 times the price of these guns brand new just to have one. Mid life crisis maybe, whether a new gun or a piece of nostalgia they're still allot of fun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pbshooter1217 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

If you really want a .410, buy a 12 gauge double barrel and get tubes to go with it. That way you can shoot whatever you want.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

pbshooter...should you also buy wheels for that 12 ga. double? That's some heavy packin otherwise.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I hope your wingshooting skills are way above average, if you intend to pursue ruffed grouse (or any gamebird for that matter)with a .410 and hope to be successful.
The number of people I have see who could actually kill doves on a regular basis with a .410 can be counted on one hand and even then they picked their shots. Might I suggest a nice s/s or o/u in 28 gauge, and a lot of time at the skeet club.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pbshooter1217 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Sayfu, if he buys a 12 or 20 gauge, he can have a tube for the .410. If he can't hit anything with the .410, he won't have to buy a new gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

You can buy a lt. wt. 12 nowdays, and a 20 can be very light, and regarded as one of the bigger gauges. I don't think there are many light, 12 ga. side by sides however...maybe so. This guy doesn't want to communicate at all, so I just assumed he was thinking 410 because it is a light gun to carry.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

There have been more than a few muskrats and fish-eating birds fall victim to my Savage pump .410 bore. A few darling starlings, too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Is there a season on starlings?!?!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

.410 could be a squirrel gun and thats all i can think of...non moving target at close range. every once in a blue moon ill carry a 28 gauge pheasant hunting, but i but i dont think i would ever carry a .410 for bigger game birds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I don't know if I can explain this or not so please indulge me for a minute. It seems like the bottom line in this discussion has wandered off to game limits and heavy game bags when maybe, at least in my case, it's not as much about how much game I harvest as it is the experience of enjoying the firearm itself. The late, great Gary Sitton once wrote that he "greatly enjoyed the company of his rifles" and I understand that concept.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Carney

In WA, 24/7/365.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

007..My point is, don't enjoy your ego at the expense of being sporting when hunting game. It isn't a sportsman that is willing to fire at a pheasant, let's say, at 40 yds. using a 410. with 7 1/2 loads. To wound game using a gun you should not be using for the task at hand because you are under gunned is not sporting. You owe it to the game you hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Sayfu, no disagreement, just stay within your limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Most of the guys who use these guns like to use them in the winter when running snowshoe hares with beagles. When I was young allot of people thought of the 410. as a youth starter gun. This was a flawed philosophy for sure. In my opinion a 410. is best suited for an older more experienced hunter who is more realistic about not only on the gun's limitations but his own limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It would be a good rabbit gun. I sure wish here is SE Idaho we weren't on a down cycle for rabbits. I enjoy extending my season hunting cottontails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from billerooo wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Sayfu,
I have a Cynergy with 30" in the 3.5" waterfowl edition. Its heavy there is no doubt but I have gotten used to it and nothing else seems right. I am going to buy a set of briley inserts for it to shoot skeet. Sometimes I wish I hadn't bought the camo version but its worth the odd looks I get in tournaments.

As for light weight guns I have a Savage Milano in 28 gauge that is light as a feather but kicks like a mule. My thought was that my wife would shoot it but instead prefers the M2 in 20gauge for less punishing shooting.

I am looking foward to having the .410 set for squirrel hunting and snakes as well as competition.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I'd ask around other shooters about investing much in choke tubes. Many shooters smile when you ask them if Briley's, or any of the other big name choke tube mfgers make a difference...if extended tubes make a difference? Most don't believe so. The right choke ID (diameter) for your gun at the distances you break targets is the key. About the only difference for the extended tubes is the quickness of change.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I would love to use a .410 in a SXS. The CZ USA is a good one for the money, but I am not a good enough shot gunner. 20 ga. is the smallest I carry.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

No one is on certain types of hunting. I've got a DVD by Bob Scott, and Marty Fischer describing a hunt in S. America for big pigeons, not doves. They are both excellent shots, and it is an instructional video about shooting technique, and showing you lead with the "eye cam" They state that they do not recommend using a 28 ga., or the 410...just too small of bore. They classify the 20 ga as a big bore gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DesertWalker wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I inherited a .410, Snake Charmer II from my grandfather that I shot with him when I was young, it was one of the first guns that I shot and had so much fun with it. It was a gun that was made and sold in Texas. Haven’t found anther Snake Charmer II and I have looked, found alota copies but no originals. After inheriting it I took it squirrel hunting and had so much fun with it. I have also taken dove with the gun. It is a fun to shoot gun and can require some skill to take birds but provides a good sporting action to the hunt. I haven’t found a problem with just wounding birds or rabbits or squirrel, but I also do not shoot over about 25yrds if not closer. I do love the gun for both sentimental and fun reasons.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buckmaster909 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I have a savage modle 951 springfield single shot fro 1968. With the right loads it can kill any thing. Plus the barrels as long as that on a deer gun, so its more acrate. But, you do have to know your limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nickpie67 wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

I would only recommend them for an experienced hunter when using game load as the spread is not as big as a 20, 16, or 12 gauge spread. But they are indeed a great rabbit, quail, and squirrel guns and a great youth gun as they do not kick that bad at all compared to my winchester 1200 12 gauge. My favorite .410 is the H&R snake tamer. great survival or 'SHTF' gun which even holds 5 rounds in the stock. Highly recommend this gun as it is inexpensive (200 or lower) and shoots straight.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Doug76 wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I hear a lot of this, that a .410 is not good for beginners and is more an experts gun. I couldn't disagree more.
I was started off with a .410 at age 8, and most of the boys in my area were also. You learn to shoot very well with one precisely because it is more difficult, and you learn it's range quickly too. For small stature people it is an excellent gun to start with, not nearly the recoil or noise of a 20 or a 12.
For small game it's fun and deadly within it's limits.
And it will make you a better clays shooter for sure.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from barnhllo wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I absolutely love hunting with a .410; I own several. The .410 makes a great rabbit gun...cottontails and snowshoe hares. Even the 2.5" half ounce loads are deadly on rabbits. I have killed both grouse and pheasants with the .410 but don't usually target them with the little gun.

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from Trip55 wrote 1 year 9 weeks ago

I started out on a .410 I took my first turkey with one at 20 yards a small jake. That first year I also shot about 20 ducks all woodies and teal. i was 10 at the time, im now 16

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Post a Reply

from Sayfu wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I'd ask around other shooters about investing much in choke tubes. Many shooters smile when you ask them if Briley's, or any of the other big name choke tube mfgers make a difference...if extended tubes make a difference? Most don't believe so. The right choke ID (diameter) for your gun at the distances you break targets is the key. About the only difference for the extended tubes is the quickness of change.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

What would you use it for?..hunting what?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

There are a number of companies still making the .410 . H&R,Mossberg,Remington,Saiga,Benelli,Baretta,Rossi,NEF and I am sure there are more that I can't think of right now. People still use them for kids,home defense,skeet,squirel hunting,rabbits, deer and so on. It is not a toy like many would have you believe. It takes some skill to shoot skeet with one of these little guns. I use mine for squirels,rabbits,skeet and with the help of a custom made HBBS, deer hunting. And yes,it will take deer,hog or black bear pretty easy out to and exceeding 100 yards or more. Only draw back is the cost of shells for it. But ammo is getting expensive for everything now any way you look at it. $3 a shoot

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shazam wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Grouse. A friend of mine filled his quota with a .410 break action single shot last weekend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Would apply to grouse at short range, maybe sitting in a tree. Not enough shot to sportingly shoot bigger game birds at normal distances...say 30 yrds. and out....like pheasants for instance.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I guess I'm starting into my second childhood. I wanted a .410 when I was a kid and dad refused, said a .410 is an expert's gun and instead started me with a 20. He was a lot smarter than I gave him credit for in those days. These days I'm thinking a .410 of some sort, preferrably a pump or SxS, would be a nice little companion for the squirrel woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

deerhunter listed a lot of mfger's that make 410's, but the first one I looked up, Benelli, didn't show any 410's that they made...not even any 16 ga's. Depends on sales, and sales don't merit many 410's sold..maybe to a skeet shooter that wants to shoot in that classification. But as light as they make shotguns today, a 20 ga. gives you a wide range of shot shells at decent prices instead of the high priced 410 shells, and you can hunt all the game birds with a very light wt. gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

If your looking for an all purpose shotgun it's not the best choice. Limitations you betcha loads of fun are without a doubt. While new gun sales aren't over the top the used gun market is huge. The main reason for this is that older guys like me that grew up with these "bunny guns" as we used to call them are looking for the guns they grew up with such as the Ithaca model 66 or the Winchester model 21 which are no longer in production. I've seen guys pay 3 or 4 times the price of these guns brand new just to have one. Mid life crisis maybe, whether a new gun or a piece of nostalgia they're still allot of fun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pbshooter1217 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

If you really want a .410, buy a 12 gauge double barrel and get tubes to go with it. That way you can shoot whatever you want.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

pbshooter...should you also buy wheels for that 12 ga. double? That's some heavy packin otherwise.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I hope your wingshooting skills are way above average, if you intend to pursue ruffed grouse (or any gamebird for that matter)with a .410 and hope to be successful.
The number of people I have see who could actually kill doves on a regular basis with a .410 can be counted on one hand and even then they picked their shots. Might I suggest a nice s/s or o/u in 28 gauge, and a lot of time at the skeet club.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pbshooter1217 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Sayfu, if he buys a 12 or 20 gauge, he can have a tube for the .410. If he can't hit anything with the .410, he won't have to buy a new gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

You can buy a lt. wt. 12 nowdays, and a 20 can be very light, and regarded as one of the bigger gauges. I don't think there are many light, 12 ga. side by sides however...maybe so. This guy doesn't want to communicate at all, so I just assumed he was thinking 410 because it is a light gun to carry.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

There have been more than a few muskrats and fish-eating birds fall victim to my Savage pump .410 bore. A few darling starlings, too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Is there a season on starlings?!?!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

.410 could be a squirrel gun and thats all i can think of...non moving target at close range. every once in a blue moon ill carry a 28 gauge pheasant hunting, but i but i dont think i would ever carry a .410 for bigger game birds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I don't know if I can explain this or not so please indulge me for a minute. It seems like the bottom line in this discussion has wandered off to game limits and heavy game bags when maybe, at least in my case, it's not as much about how much game I harvest as it is the experience of enjoying the firearm itself. The late, great Gary Sitton once wrote that he "greatly enjoyed the company of his rifles" and I understand that concept.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Carney

In WA, 24/7/365.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

007..My point is, don't enjoy your ego at the expense of being sporting when hunting game. It isn't a sportsman that is willing to fire at a pheasant, let's say, at 40 yds. using a 410. with 7 1/2 loads. To wound game using a gun you should not be using for the task at hand because you are under gunned is not sporting. You owe it to the game you hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Sayfu, no disagreement, just stay within your limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Most of the guys who use these guns like to use them in the winter when running snowshoe hares with beagles. When I was young allot of people thought of the 410. as a youth starter gun. This was a flawed philosophy for sure. In my opinion a 410. is best suited for an older more experienced hunter who is more realistic about not only on the gun's limitations but his own limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It would be a good rabbit gun. I sure wish here is SE Idaho we weren't on a down cycle for rabbits. I enjoy extending my season hunting cottontails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from billerooo wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Sayfu,
I have a Cynergy with 30" in the 3.5" waterfowl edition. Its heavy there is no doubt but I have gotten used to it and nothing else seems right. I am going to buy a set of briley inserts for it to shoot skeet. Sometimes I wish I hadn't bought the camo version but its worth the odd looks I get in tournaments.

As for light weight guns I have a Savage Milano in 28 gauge that is light as a feather but kicks like a mule. My thought was that my wife would shoot it but instead prefers the M2 in 20gauge for less punishing shooting.

I am looking foward to having the .410 set for squirrel hunting and snakes as well as competition.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I would love to use a .410 in a SXS. The CZ USA is a good one for the money, but I am not a good enough shot gunner. 20 ga. is the smallest I carry.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

No one is on certain types of hunting. I've got a DVD by Bob Scott, and Marty Fischer describing a hunt in S. America for big pigeons, not doves. They are both excellent shots, and it is an instructional video about shooting technique, and showing you lead with the "eye cam" They state that they do not recommend using a 28 ga., or the 410...just too small of bore. They classify the 20 ga as a big bore gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DesertWalker wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I inherited a .410, Snake Charmer II from my grandfather that I shot with him when I was young, it was one of the first guns that I shot and had so much fun with it. It was a gun that was made and sold in Texas. Haven’t found anther Snake Charmer II and I have looked, found alota copies but no originals. After inheriting it I took it squirrel hunting and had so much fun with it. I have also taken dove with the gun. It is a fun to shoot gun and can require some skill to take birds but provides a good sporting action to the hunt. I haven’t found a problem with just wounding birds or rabbits or squirrel, but I also do not shoot over about 25yrds if not closer. I do love the gun for both sentimental and fun reasons.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buckmaster909 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I have a savage modle 951 springfield single shot fro 1968. With the right loads it can kill any thing. Plus the barrels as long as that on a deer gun, so its more acrate. But, you do have to know your limitations.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nickpie67 wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

I would only recommend them for an experienced hunter when using game load as the spread is not as big as a 20, 16, or 12 gauge spread. But they are indeed a great rabbit, quail, and squirrel guns and a great youth gun as they do not kick that bad at all compared to my winchester 1200 12 gauge. My favorite .410 is the H&R snake tamer. great survival or 'SHTF' gun which even holds 5 rounds in the stock. Highly recommend this gun as it is inexpensive (200 or lower) and shoots straight.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Doug76 wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I hear a lot of this, that a .410 is not good for beginners and is more an experts gun. I couldn't disagree more.
I was started off with a .410 at age 8, and most of the boys in my area were also. You learn to shoot very well with one precisely because it is more difficult, and you learn it's range quickly too. For small stature people it is an excellent gun to start with, not nearly the recoil or noise of a 20 or a 12.
For small game it's fun and deadly within it's limits.
And it will make you a better clays shooter for sure.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from barnhllo wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I absolutely love hunting with a .410; I own several. The .410 makes a great rabbit gun...cottontails and snowshoe hares. Even the 2.5" half ounce loads are deadly on rabbits. I have killed both grouse and pheasants with the .410 but don't usually target them with the little gun.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trip55 wrote 1 year 9 weeks ago

I started out on a .410 I took my first turkey with one at 20 yards a small jake. That first year I also shot about 20 ducks all woodies and teal. i was 10 at the time, im now 16

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

The guy can't even answer the question as to what he'd use it for.

-6 Good Comment? | | Report

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