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Campfire

Get Your Hunting Camp Featured in F&S!

Uploaded on June 25, 2009

Besides a treestand, it’s tough to think of a better place to spend the fall than at camp. The traditions, the friendships, the woodsmoke—they’re all part of what keep us coming back to camp season after season. That’s why were devoting the cover story in the October 2009 issue of Field & Stream to hunting camp. Part of what make hunting camp so great is that no two are the same. And that’s where you come in.

We want to feature your hunting camp in F&S. Here’s what we’d like to know:

1.    What’s your favorite camp tradition?
2.    What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
3.    What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
4.    What’s your favorite camp meal?
5.    In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special.

Submit your answers right here in the Campfire message board. And while you’re at it, send us photos of your camp, too. (Please e-mail them to F&S senior editor, Colin Kearns, at colin.kearns@bonniercorp.com.)

To those who submit the best answers and camp photos, we’ll send a free F&S hat—and we’ll make your camp famous by featuring it in the October 2009 issue of Field & Stream.

Top Rated
All Replies
from tttitans wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Our camps favorite trdition is to get around and sharpen our knives and oil our guns.
There was this deer feeder out on our land that someone else had put there. We didn't like the thought of someone else baiting on our land, so we decided to move things around a little. We took that feeder and we put it about 100 yards south of where it was at. He found it though. :(
Our most seriously taken camp rule would have to be not to touch the weapons unless EVERYONE is aware it is mobile.
My camps favorite meal is Bisuits and Gravy with hashbrowns, eggs, and beef jerky.
My camp is special because everyone is so close and we all share common likes and dislikes.

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

What happens in camp stays in camp! Wholly smokes, you want to get me in trouble?

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Favorite tradition- Simple Deer Hunting

Prank- 2 days before season. People always want to see if the salmon and trout are running up the creek. A few go down to look. Me and a few others follow. with one in the first group in on the prank. We hide in the brush and wait for his signal. He all of sudden says what is that? Then he runs straight down the creek. The others baffled, start heading back up the hill. That is when we come in. Make a bunch of thrashing noises pretending to be bear. We are wearing dark clothes. we can tell they are getting nervous and start wildy pointing their flashlights everywhere. Finally they shine it right on us, we thought we were busted, but the light stayed and we heard them ask what those objects were. Now really nervous they stared moving real fast back up the hill. After they went out of sight we hustled up a different trail and drove to town, we were supposed to be gone and had parked on the road. They would not have gone down if we wer there. Not the first time we played this joke. When we got back we listened to the story of how they saw two bear that they thought were stalikng them. We let them go all week before letting them in on it.

Rules-Safety always comes first, never have had any kind of accidents in my 20+ years.

Favorite Meal-Anything the camp cook prepares, or you are on pearl diving duty.

Pretty much the same group for 20+ years.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I'm pretty sure that our camp is not F&S feature material but we sure have a lot of fun there. Not just during hunting season but all year long.
An OLD mobile home with the orange/brown/red shag carpet that we all remember from long ago. Lots of antlers on the wall and mounts from the 1950's adorn the walls but we do have a new refrigerator and LOTS of cold beer =)
1) we have a tradition of taking buckpole pictures the Sunday after the first week of hunting.
2) Seems like every year the anotomy of a harvested buck shows up in someones blind. eck!
3)Fried fresh venison backstraps and fried potatoes. Cold beer
4) Our camp is special because;
Both guys and girls hunt and gather at night to share hunting stories.
JB

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from colinkearns wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is all really great stuff, everyone! Please keep it coming.

-Colin, F&S Senior Editor

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from muskiemaster wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

tradition- on the saturday night we go into town get some chicken then go to a bar and play 6,5,4.

Prank- My grandpa threatened the first year of my hunting that he'd wake me up with a cup of water and I didn't believe him until 5 that morning I lay in bed and was suddenly given a cold wake up after not getting up the first time.

Camp rule- Tie for this one: first is that we practice QDM and the second is you have to go to the outhouse no going right off the steps.

Camp meal- getting chicken at the first night of camp and having eggs, bacon and toast the next morning.

special- Our camp is special because for almost every year the past five years we have new members joining us and experiencing hunting at it's best.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

ok....so I read this again and realized that I missed #3 which totally threw my answers off. The answer to #3 is...you have to come to camp to have FUN and if you come to bit@% and complain, turn right around in the driveway and go away.
Oh and then there is the "has to be bigger than a seven point buck thing but the fun is the rule you HAVE to obey.
JB

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from country road wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

We have no particular tradition except to be safe and be successful.
The favorite prank is the old stunt where we take a novice hunter out to scout around and show him/her some deer sign such as rubs, tracks, scrapes and scat. Once he has seen enough to know what he's looking at, we find a pile of droppings that we prepared earlier using 'Raisinets' and proceed to determine the sex and age of the "deer" by first sniffing, then tasting the "droppings". Any offer to the novice to share in the experiment is always declined and I've learned some new words from them.
Camp rule: Shoot a doe for every buck and keep the woodbox full.
Camp meal is whatever I put in the Crockpot---venison chili, lasagnae, chicken stew, venison steak stroganoff, etc.
It's special because everybody is anxious to get there and nobody wants to leave. We have a good success rate.

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from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

1. Our tradition is to take a leak on the same tree on the way to camp for good luck. it was kind of inadvertent tradition but now we do it every year
2. my cousin can take a paper towel roll and make a sound just like a bear. one night my brother went to go water a bush and my cousin followed him. after finishing his buisness my cousin growled at my brother and the "bear" chased him all the way back to camp
3.dont tell the location of hunting areas and camp
4. nothing tastes better than homemade stew after a long day of hiking!
5.the thing that has always made camp so special for me is the time spent in the trailer with my father uncles grandfather cousins and brother learning who i am where i came from and who i want to be

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from madtrapper wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

our deer camp is special becasue well, its the the place were old friends become brothers, and the strangers quickly become friends. our deercamp is actually a college dorm, located in the heart of New Yorks Adirondack mts. Paul Smith Colleges' clinton hall is lovingly known as "deer camp" to the guys that live in it and rest of the college. Deer Camp is an all male, forestry major dorm that holds 35 of us knuckle heads. Cant find your gear? need help dragging your harvest? wann learn a new skill? The guy down the hall most likely borrowed your gear, might be sober enough to help ya drag out your buck, and could possibly know what the heck he's talking about. Sadly We can't keep our guns in the dorm so campus safety has made an "armory" for us. Kitchen, heck no, our deer camp has the hottest grill in the north country where tons of venison, bear, waterfowl, and trout have been bbq'ed while enjoying a few cold ones with the boys. Pranks, c'mon you can imagine the pranks that thirty-five, 18-22yr olds play on each other. We love deer camp, every year we hang our great countries flag in a 120ft "Pinus strobus" behind camp so everyone on campus can see it, and finally we added a buck pole behind clinton where a max of 2 deer can hang awaiting processing in our dormroom. sorry for rambling, but our deercamp is simpley the best, and if you dont agree, well..i'll introduce you to 35 of the meanest, ugliest, hairiest bunch of young (but very skilled) hunters thaty'll convince you otherwise.

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from Texasrhodes wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

At our deer lease it had always been just the guys. One year they decided to have a "wives weekend." Some of the guys at our lease were lawyers and one was even a judge. Unknown to everyone else, the landowner's son, who none of the wives knew, rode his horse down to the gate and locked it. The wives all pulled up in a train of cars. Mercedes, BMWs, and Jaguars lined the dirt road. The landowner's son rode up to them and started yelling at them "this was wives weekend, you whores gotta leave, no business this weekend." Then he just rode back to camp. This was in the days before cell phones. The wives went back to town (4 miles) and called the camp house. That was the last wives weekend.

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from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
Drinks and Cards, and lately we like to sit inside the wall tent next to the wood-stove and watch Comedy's on the DVD player running off the generator. With the extended whitetail season we started having Thanksgiving dinner in camp last year. It was the best Thanksgiving in memory, killed a buck that morning, hung on the pole in time for dinner.
2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
Spotlighting Spot lighters. Seen some guys spotlighting a distant clearcut in the middle of the night, so we fired up our spotlight and hit them with it, their light went out immediately as they sneaked away.
3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Get your lazy butt out of bed and keep the wood stove going, no excuse for a dead fire in the morning.
4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
Thanksgiving, followed a couple nights later using the turkey fryer and leftover grease with a Deep Fry of battered Fish, mushrooms, onions, hush puppies, and whatever else we can batter and fry.
5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special. Spending time in the woods with the best of friends, the best of food, the best of drink, and the best of locations, in the wild mountains of Idaho.
We all hunt hard in extremely rough country in the Mountains of Idaho. We have over the years perfected our craft of Tarpentry to the point we set up a very comfortable, yet simple camp. I look forward to the time spent in late whitetail camp more than anything else throughout the year. There is nothing better....

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from klug3 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

My favorite camp tradition is the poker game played before every opeining morning.

Camp rule taken most seriously is be safe with your weapon.

My favorite camp meal is grandpa's venison stew.

What makes our camp special is family.

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from Minnesota wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

1.) The buck bottle or coming up with odd names for certain spots.
2.)
3.) Don't divulge the secret spots.
4.) Pasties
5 At deer camp everything outside of hunting is left at the door.

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from mark456 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Kids get opportunity to gobble up the passion for hunting wild turkey Advice from wildlife managers on where to focus your hunting efforts Wild Turkey Federation, will be the featured instructor at the Mogollon Rim Camp.Tonto National Forest
mark456

[url=http://www.fastrealestate.net]real estate[/url]

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from mark456 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Kids get opportunity to gobble up the passion for hunting wild turkey Advice from wildlife managers on where to focus your hunting efforts Wild Turkey Federation, will be the featured instructor at the Mogollon Rim Camp.Tonto National Forest
mark456
real estate

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from jlmckinney wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
Lighting the Camp Fire. It says welcome Home!

2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
Hide the Toilet Paper! :(

3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Hiding the toilet paper, Safety, and making sure all weapons are cleaned/unloaded/ready to go the next morning.

4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
Camp Taters with Sausage or Steak!

5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special.
Being with friends and family, experiencing the outdoors, and having a good time in the woods!

Semper Fi
God Bless America

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from senglund wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Deer Camp is a family tradition for us. It consists of my Dad, his 3 brothers, myself, and now my wife(she hunts too). Deer Camp is usually one week out of early-muzzleloader season in VA. We camp just outside of Lynchburg, VA in Amherst County.

It used to be all of "the brothers" (my dad and his bros) would pull up their trucks and either put up their tents or just sleep in the back of the truck. As the years have gone by, we now pull up our campers and my dad even has a small utility-shed-turned-cabin on the property that he and my little brother (forgot about him) sleep in.

Our family is big on tradition. My grandfather used to pull up his camper just to hang out for the week. When we'd come back to camp after a morning hunt, you could bet that Grampa would be sitting at his picnic table with a rifle leaning against his camper waiting for any unsuspecting deer that would walk by (the brothers had bought him a lifetime hunting license years back). After he passed away, we are sure to always hang his hat on "the tree" in the middle of camp along with a horseshoe. We'd always rub the shoe for an extra measure of luck and still do now.

Honestly, we're not really big on pranks at this point, but after this, maybe we will be;)

One camp rule that we have, and take serious, is to eat well. We follow this to the "t". Meals are almost always hot and everyone takes a turn in cooking. We don't skimp on meals either.

This naturally leads to the discussion of what our favorite meal is. This is hard to decide. Things like meatloaf, hot breakfast meals, homemade chicken BBQ, complete dutch oven meals are all in the competition. It's (at this point) a toss up. Our family has Swedish roots (remember, we're big on tradition) so we will have a Swedish potato sausage (we call it potato blogna). It tastes good, but looks like something you'd rather not bite into. This meal is tied with Golden Hominy Scramble. Enough said on that, I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!

Family is important to us so the time we spend together around the fire telling stories of camping, hunting and fishing trips past and the new memories that we create every year we continue this tradition that we call Deer Camp.

That's our story. Pictures will be submitted soon.

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from Christian Emter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

1. Getting up early to make a cafe mocha.

2. One time my dad, our freind Randy went elk hunting. We were hunting in some thick fallen timber. So we told Randy we were going after a bull we had spotted on a distant ridge. So we went down to explore the creek at the bottom of the draw. When we got back to camp we told him we got him but its going to be a hell of time getting him out because its steep and lots of timber was in the way. He said ahhh shit. He said really and we were like ya you didnt hear the gun shots. He said no.... you guys didnt get him. Ya we didnt get him we were just shittin ya.

3. Be safe with all the weapons, and getting some good grub to eat.

4. Chicken Gizzards, steak, or roasting our homemade German sausage over the fire, and top it off with some hot cocoa and no bake cheese cake.

5. Having the family around the fire or fishing a lake together, or when I camp by myself I love siiting by the fire with my thoughts.

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

The best camp tradition is to take a sauna at the end of each night. It just feels good after hunting all day, and it refreshes you for the next day.

No pranks (yet). Although I am a natural born prankster, I have been told no pranks at camp.

Unload your weapon before you walk in the door, and keep tabs on where it is aimed. Otherwise you may not like the next place the barrel ends up.

Our favorite camp meal is on the first night my grandpa brings out pollenta (with lots of cheese and butter) and red sauce and either partridge or venison.

Like every camp I have just read about, family and friends are what makes our camp special.

Out at the hunting camp there is room to breath, space to let your mind be at ease, and a simple lifestyle. Plainly said, this is life in Da U.P., Eh!

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from CMiller92 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Our best camp tradition is playing football on Thanksgiving after the morning hunt or just sitting around and listening to my grandpa tell stories.

The best prank happened when me and my dad were walking back from a morning hunt in a nearby stand. As we were walking my dad saw a deer not more than ten yards to our left. He shoved me out of the way to get a clear shot but it was just a decoy that my grandpa set up to trick us. Everyone was laughing execpt me.

The rule my grandpa takes most seriously is us keeping our things in one spot because it is a small camp with a lot of people. Either that or not to over cook the meat at dinner.

My favorite meal is BBQ ribs and french fries.

Our camp is so special not only because of the hunting or fishing but because of the great friends and family that stay there every fall to enjoy it.

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from Rumrunner wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

There's nothing like pulling up to camp and getting the fire going, the smell of wood smoke brings back years of memories. Splitting wood, more gear than you could possibly use while you're there.

Just about every meal tastes better at camp then home right?

It's been a great place to spend time with family and friends. When my dad died last year he left my brother and I a note that said keep the camp going and you can be sure we will.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

It is because of the days spent with family at our camp that I appreciate every minute that I get to spend at ours. Our family started out in a little tiny one room cabin that 6 of us piled in to on the weekends. A wood stove kept us warm and a charcoal grill was what we cooked lunch and supper on. Eventually a new camp was built with modern facilities but I will always hold dear the time spent in the "little" camp.
My kids grew up going to my parents camp and saw that it was a gathering place for family and friends, young and old. They learned to pick huckelberries and take walks in the woods. Heck, they even learned how to use the outhouse before the indoor bathroom had running water.
We now own a camp of our own and it isn't the biggest or the most beautiful. In fact my sister told her daughter that "if I guy ever brings you to a place like this....run". But it is our camp and we host many get togethers there. EVERYONE is welcome and lots of fun is had.
I know that it is not always possible but it would be nice if everyone in their lifetime could spend a weekend at camp. No phones, no computers, no time schedule. Just relax and enjoy what the good Lord has given us to enjoy. I guarantee that by Monday they would have a whole different outlook on life.
Best therapy in the world and it is FREE.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

At first I didn't think that I would want to have my hunting camp featured in Field and Streams cover story. But after much urging and persuading by family and friends, I thought,why not?

It's not a log cabin with three bed rooms or anything that a reader would find luxurious,but we do have all of the comforts of outdoor living,with electricity.I call that,"roughing it smoothly!"
What we lack in luxury,is made up in great friendship and camaraderie ...unsurpassed.

We hunt on on approximately 110 acres, in Kentucky,mostly fields, a lake,with some timber and a huge thicket of cedars,next to another farm that is approximately 86 acres with most of the cedars cut,as the tops still cover the ground. Both of these parcels of land border a Wildlife Management Area of 900 acres. We also have access to another 33 acres up the road that is not attached to these parcels.

We,mostly myself, sleep in what I call a shanty. When I took my youngest son Bo huntin'for the first time, he said it was "ghetto." His first question was,"where do we shower?" My reply was a"creek out back."

The shanty sleeps two men and a boy, and has electricity that we use for a micro-wave, to warm up the grub, we have prepared ahead of time for opening day,and the days that follow.
We also put up tents,if more guys show up for the huntin' party.

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
A tradition that we have started,actually takes place the week prior to opening day. A few fellows would get together and sight in our guns/bows,eat jerky and deer chili,and watch deer huntin' videos. Now it's turned into a ministry,with our church donating over a $1000.00 dollars towards 3-D targets. We get anywhere from twenty to eighty people showing up to eat,fellowship and practice shootin'!

In camp on opening day, we have a tradition that we do every morning prior to entering the field. It's called a smoke-out. We burn leaves in the campfire,while we all stand in a circle praying to God and asking him to bless the hunt, and His Divine protection for all hunters.
The leaf burning also acts as a cover-up.

2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
We aren't to fond of pranks, since guns and ammo, and jokes don't mix.
But one year, a new,young hunter came into camp and got his first buck. We saw him dragging out the deer by the antlers, and told him he had it all wrong. We told him he had to use the bucks ears,so he wouldn't ruin the rack for a mount he wanted.
We let the taxidermist in on the joke a couple of months later,and when he called the owner, he said that his ears "were pulled out" so much that the deer looked like Mickey Mouse.
The young owner of the mounted buck, was so surprised, you could have tipped him over with a feather.

3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Besides ... if it's brown,it's down?
No women!
Sorry ladies ...

4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
A member of our huntin' party,Smitty, makes the best deer jerky,and has a great recipe for salsa that is out of this world!
He too has the Kentucky State Deer Record, typical.

5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special.
Our camp is conjoined, and possesses that one common trait and characteristic as all animals in the kingdom,having all of our six senses intact and active,(the sixth, being intuitiveness)gathered in unity,interwoven and hunting in harmony,and finding it profitable and practical, in a cooperative effort, as a living, breathing entity,through the brotherhood of hunters,in the great outdoors,that our God created for our pleasure;single-minded,but still maintaining our own individual, eccentric ways, as huntin'men of the Kentucky woods,as we breathe in from the campfires of our lives.

As I always like to say,"C'mon out Monster!"

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

2Poppa...NO WOMEN!!!! You made me say AWWWWWWWW right out loud.
Are there any women in your member's families that show an interest in hunting???
You have seen my posts and read my stories so you know how much hunting means to me. I have no interest in shopping come November 15th however, if I was left home because I was not allowed at camp...come Monday morning I would have an awesome diamond ring to show everyone at work. =)
I know there are many, many camps that have the no woman rule and that is ok. But I double dog dare someone to tell me I can't come to camp. I always tease the guys that they are just afraid I will show them up on the buck pole.
Have a great weekend.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Judy-
I knew before hand that I would get a reply from you.LOL
I hunt with my best friend the first several days and he is adamant about "No Women!" I probably need to ask him why?

Myself? I'm a little skeptical to take my wife,due to the fact she peed under my tree stand the first time I took her.

I only have two kids left in the nest,a 17-year old young man,Bo,and a 15-year old young lady,Tessa.
Bo ... well he is just a hand full and I've tried my very best to convert him.

Tessa?
I did take her bow huntin'once with me,when she was about 9-years old,but she had to pee too. As you can tell,I didn't know that women had to take special precaution,to facilitate the flow properly. At that very moment, 3-does walked within 15-feet of the flow area.After she finished, I realized she had more on her than the ground.
I'm trying to get her,of course her boyfriend too,to go target shootin' ... just to get a rifle in her hands,and get her comfortable with it.

I loved your double-dog dare ... hadn't heard that phrase in a long while.

Heck Judy,after reading all of your posts,you're like one of the guys,but different.You of all women, would most certainly be welcomed in my camp,and most of the guys would probably learn a thing or two!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

You made me smile...thank you. I could go on and on but I have to tell you a story...imagine that.
One year I sat in a blind down in the swamp and about 10am my husband and one of his buddies walked down to where I was hunting. Standing around they decided it would be funny to pee on the ground out in front of my blind. They laughed and then we all went up to the house.
That night I shot a beautiful 8 point buck...right there where they took a leak. HA...joke was on them.
I am not above leaving my blind to pee in the woods and I throw out a dirty word with the best of them. I love to hunt and I love to have fun and THAT is what it is all about.
Be careful what you throw out there 2Poppa...you just might have a visitor at your camp. And...yeah, I probably could teach the guys a thing or two and one of them would be that women could and would be welcome at your camp.
Us girls have left some cowboys scratching their heads after a week at their ranch. We love to have fun and we know how to do it.
Lighten up guys....we don't have cooties. Kick the dirty books under the bed and have a girls night at camp. Now...I triple dog dare you. Nobody backs down from a triple.
GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN!!!!
JB

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

We do not allow women either, not because we are sexist. The cabin is small and we sleep 10 to 12 men. No real doors on any room. There is a line opening morning for the toilet. We have power, but no running water. We do have a septic field and running toilet, but have to manually flush. The cabin is not women friendly, the women who do go up on different occasions stay out in a tent, because they do not like the cabin. Not many women want to be around a bunch ofmen who have not showered in about a week. It is a time where we do not have to watch our language or our manners as much.

P.S Peeing around stands is not really a big deal IMO

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from Androcles wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Our camp consists of a few small roads, a little snow, a cabin, and as many men (typically family members and close friends) as we can get. Significant others are optional, of course.

1. My favorite camp tradition? Well, I must say I have two. First, every year my father will start counting down the weeks until we head north for "the cabin". "11 weeks" he'll say; I do not believe that even Christmas Eve is as exciting as hearing "1 week!" Second, every year we mark the main beam of the cabin with permanent marker declaring our "kills" to the world, even though sometimes numbers like 2 or 3 do appear. Sorry Dad.

2. The best prank we have ever pulled off? A hard one to answer but I suppose placing a cardboard target shaped like a deer in the woods about 20 yds out back and watching my Dad and Uncle go at it.

3. What camp rule do we guys take most seriously? That definitely has to be no loaded guns in the cabin--ever. Ohh, and no, Mom, I did not forget--knock the snow off the boots!

4. Favorite camp meal? Definitely got be the potato soup that is always simmering on the wood stove waiting for us men to finally give up on "that big one" and come in for a bite.

5. Why is our camp so special? Come with us next year and you will soon see.

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I envy you guys that have a hunting camp. I live in Ohio where you hunt the farm down the road. You sleep at home, meet a few buddies early in the morning then hit the woods. While in stand your always anxious to hear the other guys story. The closest thing to camp we have is when we all meet up after the hunt(we are strictly archery on my farm)and tell our stories spawned from the morning hunt. Most the time we'll just head to my house where we catch up on family and things. Maybe the wife will make breakfast. Most of my buddy's live in the big city and stay the day waiting for the evening hunt. We'll sit around and watch a game and share stories during the day. I know my friends really appreciate hunting my farm and they always fall over themselves thanking me. What they do not know is that I couldn't hunt without them. We have no real tradition. Maybe friendship if you consider that a tradition or the fact that we all take the same stand opening day. Lately my greatest joy has been watching the younger kids take their first deer. I've shot nearly a hundred deer but it's weird how a small 6 pt buck taken by my son last year brought a tear to my eye. We have shot our share of large bucks over the years but the biggest whoops and hollars in my woods come after the young'ns harvest a deer.

Afer my buddy shot a nice buck I slipped the testicles into his coat pocket only to be discovered by his wife a couple weeks later. What's that smell Rick? Ha!
I have one rule. Take no shot until it's time. We do not wound deer. It should be rule number one for all archery hunters. Wait for the shot.

After a long afternoon hunt we all stopped by my house for a beer. We usually turn the tube on to watch a football game. We talk about the days deer action and tomorrow. If we have it, we inhale all the deer jerky we can. It has always been a big competition to see who can make the best jerky. Recipes are top secret.

What's special about my camp? It's in my living room!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

buckhunter...I read your post shortly after you wrote it and I have been thinking about what you said.
Those of us that do have camps are certainly blessed and I thank God every day for what I have in my life.
But reading your post, eventhough you don't have a camp you still have hunting in your heart and that is important too. You still share in the comradery, the stories and the celebration of the harvest.
All that and you still get to sleep in your own bed at night. Some would call you lucky =)
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

It has been 5 weeks since Colin first posted this and I cannot believe only 22 people have responded. For me it wouldn't be about having my camp featured in the magazine as I KNOW there are far better places than ours.
But it would seem that more people would get excited at the chance to tell the stories of their camp and the traditions that are carried on from generation to generation. Just the opportunity to share the thoughts and memories that are constantly whirling around in my head is enough for me.
It is hard to find a subject that really fires people up but I truely thought this would be one. Guess everyone is different some go for the more political subjects, some for guns and such. For people like me it is the camp, the hunt, the sharing of the stories.
I always say "just think how boring this world would be if everyone was the same". Different strokes for different folks.
Happy Sunday
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I agree Judy!
I thought by now, I would have read about several dozen different camps, in various parts of the continent. I always liked lookin' at old pictures where they would have the "deer pole" hangin' up with everyones trophy.

I can't help but reminisce.

Well ... if it's to be on the October issue,we'll know soon.
Family traditions die hard!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I love to look at the old pictures of our camp. The "buck pole, the older model cars. Pretty cool stuff.
Seems like the older we(I) get, the more you appreciate your life and gain a much bigger respect for for what was. I find myself going to antique shops and saying "omg, I remember having that as a kid" or "gee, mom you gave that way or sold it at a garage sale for a buck. Look what they are getting for it".
I remember the gun rack at my dad's family camp that was made out of deer legs bent upwards to hold the gun. I remember the old woodstove that heated the camp we stayed in as a kid and hope to one day build a new camp that will be heated by that same stove.
You are right, family traditions do die hard and I hope the day comes when my kids look back and say "I remember". I'm thinking they are going to say "what the hell did she spend all this money on these mounts for". lol
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

2Poppa, I have a really cool email that I think you would enjoy. How can I get it to you??
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Judy-
Shoot me an e-mail at ...
zz2poppa@yahoo.com
Darryl Orr

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Awesome Judy-
That's probably some of the best vintage huntin' pictures I've seen. I noticed known of the men had any camo on,but wore sport jackets for the most part. A few even wore ties!

The lady sportin' the long rifle was almost certainly a protege of Annie Oakley. Some of them 'ol timers and their camps, looks as if they could have handled anything Mother Nature tossed at 'em.

I was diggin' the lace-up boots too. The lucky hunter placed his trophy's anyplace he could on the vehicles,the was a hoot!
Thanks for sharin' Judy!
Darryl

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I thought that was so cool how the draped the deer across the top of the car or along the side. No big hopped up pickups for them.
Pretty neat stuff and I often think how awsome it would have been to live "back in the day". We take so much for granted and they took nothing. It wasn't just hunting for them, it was survival. Harvesting an animal meant not only food on the table but the hides meant warm clothing or boots. Probably not much went to waste back then and now the landfills are full. We truely are a spoiled lot aren't we.
Glad you enjoyed the pictures. I'm never sure what is allowed to be posted and what isn't.
G'night
JB

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Like the two of you(Judy Black & 2Poppa), I thought there would be many more people here telling about their camps. I grew up in a family where hunting camp was one of the greatest places on earth, I guess that isn't the way for it any more. At least that is how it appears. I am glad I live in an area where the hunting camp is a second home, or in some cases the first home. Ha, ha, ha! And no matter if I get on the cover of the magazine, I still have the camp to go to. I guess I already won the real prize!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Well said Lou. Our camp is less than a mile from our home but the minute I pull in that driveway I am at a "happy" place.
Guess maybe you are right that camps are not the "thing" anymore and how sad is that? I have wonderful memories of my families camp and now of my own. Makes me sad for those that will never experience camp.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Lou-
Great point!
Perhaps that is one of the reasons Colin is interested in doing the article, is to generate a desire,even a curious one,that may awaken the next generation, to the idea of camping outdoors, just for the benefit of harvesting a deer,and the fellowship and camraderie that naturally happens.

And Lou,you hit the target,when you said you already won the real prize ... we all have, by just "having" a camp and huntin' ground that we are emotionally attached to.

It just bears a witness,a truth that only a hunter can identify with. It's deep in our souls, and runs through our blood, like the fields and streams we hunt.

Heck ... I just get happy texting 'bout it!

Come September 5th,I'll be tellin' that Monster,to C'mon Out!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I am trying to put together a 3D shoot at our camp and I am so excited I can't hardly sit still. Lots of people, lots of fun and I get to cook a hobo dinner. YEAH!
I love having people at my camp (hope it doesn't rain, not much room) but they can all see the deer that have been harvested and we can all swap stories.
Doesn't take much to get me revved up when it comes to camp, shooting, hunting and cookouts. My husband would tell you that it is "just another reason to have a party".
Like you 2poppa & Lou, we already are winners!
October 1st I will be in my tree just daring that big fella to come in bow range.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Judy-
What the heck is a Hobo dinner?
Recipe please ...

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

OMG you have never had a hobo dinner. It is cooked in a keg with a hole cut in the top. Start with boiling a picnic ham. After about an hour add fresh kielbasa. An hour later add cabbage that has been cut into wedges and wrapped in cheese cloth. On top of that put onions, new red potatoes, carrots, all of which have been wrapped in cheese cloth. Put the cover on and let it cook.
Takes about three hours but a keg full will feed 60 people.
We have a seperate keg that we then cook sweet corn in and you have your complete meal.
The cheese cloth keeps your veggies seperated and makes it a whole lot easier to get them out and put in foil pans.
Serve with some home made bread or rolls and they can use that to soak up the broth.
We do this at least once a fall when the veggies are fresh in the gardens. It is easy and feeds lots. No fuss.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

D-A-N-G!

That sure sounds inviting ... I'll bet you get a lot of people in camp that don't want to leave.

Those vittles sound a might tasty!
Thanks for sharin'!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

I cook for a bunch of friends at least three weekends a month...and I love it! Sometimes they just bring burgers or steaks to throw on the grill but most of the time I fill the roaster with "something".
Nobody leaves hungry, that is for sure.
Have a great weekend, it is raining here AGAIN. Went back to work on the ark. =(
JB

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Our idea of a hobo dinner is different, yours sounds better! Still wouldn't trade camps though, too many memories. But I am making it my goal to visit as many hunting camps as I can this fall and winter (camps in my area). For years people have been inviting me out to their camps, but I have had no time or desire. This year I make the time. Gonna be great!

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Our Harvey Hunt Camp

A small clearing, amongst the pine in the middle of 400 acres, my granddad Pete and my dad Pete would stand and plan what would become our treasured camp. It was 1955 and a chain saw was the only power tool they had to use, to start their project, of building our 20 x 40 log cabin. They pitched a tent in the clearing under the trees and called that home until they where done building.

My dad, young Pete had only been out of the hospital for 10 days after having appendix surgery but time was not on their side, they wanted to be able to hunt in that camp come November Deer hunt. Dad remembers, even though it was August they both lay in their beds, thinking the other was asleep and not wanting to awake the other and froze all night. They laughed for many years later saying “ If either of us had of spoke that night we could have got up and made a fire to keep warm”

They took materials into the site by an old homemade tractor. The main body was a KB-3 International truck. The rims where welded onto brake drums. The front tires where 900’s and the back tires where 10 hundreds. They fastened chains to the tires and made the slow trip in several miles through big water holes up treacherous hills, across beaver dams until they reached their destination.
Finishing the camp on schedule they fashioned their own bunk beds, long plank table, benches and a work area for cooking. An old cook stove stood in the kitchen and a box stove sat in the middle of the camp for warmth.
Water was carried by pail from the creek for cooking, washing, and doing dishes. Of course the trusted outhouse was promptly built as well. There was a door at the north end and another at the south end of the camp. I would imagine that granddad and dad thought if there was ever a fire they would escape at either end of the camp.

And this is where my part of the story begins. My dad raised my sister, Karen and I and we where raised at that camp. While the other kids where going on summer vacations and holidays, us kids, were always with dad and granddad at the camp. We were taught to hunt and live in the bush and appreciate and respect the land and the animals.
My most treasured memories where sitting at night, the hissing noise only, of the kerosene lantern, listening to the stories we were so lucky to have forever in our minds. We would learn at a very young age to carry our own gun, trap minnows, go with dad on his trap line to set his traps and bring home the beaver he had caught. We would hunt, work on the camp, cut firewood etc. Sometimes the trail going into camp would be so bad you wouldn’t make it and many a night after dark, with the tractor stuck in a mud hole, you would set to walking the rest of the way to camp. Sometimes we would just go play for hours while dad and granddad worked. Dads favourite saying back then was “ Don’t get wet” he knew that it was hopeless, we would be soaked and trying to dry things by the cook stove. Which reminds me of a story my dad still tells today. I was maybe 4 or 5 and I got wet, Dad wouldn’t let us go back out to play until my boots where dry cause it was late fall and cold. He set them on the open oven door to dry. I remember watching those boots thinking, “they will never dry and I wanted to get back to playing outside. I went over to that cook stove and shut the oven door, with the boots inside. I figured they would dry a whole lot faster with that door closed. No one noticed until the boots melted and the odder of melted rubber gave me away. Well I wasn’t too popular right then and that story got a whole lot funnier as the years went by than it was on that day.

Four generations of hunters (to date) and my dad 74 years young and still hunting. Dad is the only remaining hunter from it’s beginnings but his girls and boys, granddaughter and grandsons carry on the tradition. Dad has taught each one of us, himself, not just the sport of hunting but preserving and caring for our future so we will always have our camp and a place to hunt and lots of game to hunt.

We have a few men that hunt with us and have been there for many years, they are certainly our camp family but I know that my dad’s greatest enjoyment comes from having his kids and grandkids there beside him during the hunt.
In the first years of our camp we had no moose in our country so deer, partridge and bears were the only animals harvested. For about 15 years we now have a moose hunt and have been very successful. I learned to call and pride myself in being able to call for the camp. Dad ponders this and keeps saying however “ If you can call these guys in so close, do you think you could call them closer to camp so we don’t have a dirty job getting them back to camp” He has a point. I have called them into some real holes with nowhere but up on all four sides to get out. I guess I have some learning to do yet.

In the early years our camp tradition would be a big party when the men came home. I have thought about that several times in later years and wondered why these guys, (no girls in camp back then) needed to come home after 2 weeks in the bush and have a party with booze. Anyway that’s just the way it was!
Since my days of hunting everything is a tradition. We try and keep things as old school as we can. We hunt hard all day, enjoy a couple of drinks and talk about the day’s events and always eat well after dark. We hunt whether it’s raining, cold snowing or hot.
And we live by the rule. “What happens in camp, stays in camp”

Camp pranks happen so often that it’s hard to pick one so I will relate one from the first years and one from my days.

It was the late 1950’s and nearing the end of the second week of deer camp. When Gerald Harvey went to sleep one night the rest of the gang wrapped his arms around a block of wood, as if he was hugging it tightly. They then proceeded to take his picture. I can only imagine that the real fun in this picture was when they showed his wife Yvonne.

And my prank story begins with my dear friend Tony Moffat. He has hunted with us since he was 16 years old and is part of the family, but he is relentless with me in getting up and sneaking out of camp early in the morning so he can shoot the first deer or moose. And he usually does, which is really frustrating. The first night of camp he started again, so when he went to bed I handcuffed the two of us together and the gang snapped a picture. I was going to be guaranteed he wasn’t leaving without me. (picture)

Camp rules are just a necessity, and we are no different. A lot of our rules are unwritten but we live by them ensuring the safely of all of us. Gun safely comes first and foremost.
No loaded guns in camp. All guns in the rack at night. Safely in the field to ensure everyone’s life. After these rules the rest are there and we expect anyone in camp to follow them but if someone screws up it won’t get you thrown out or reprimanded too badly. Water must be in for morning, wood box filled every night, no one touches the wood stove except my dad, everyone helps with dishes and helps prepare meals, and my dads favourite “no one leaves their watch until they are called off it” Don’t even think about it!!

Our camp seems to have a strong tradition in our meals. When the camp first started my granddad would not allow no meat to be taken to camp. Potatoes, vegetables, etc but if you wanted meat you would have to hunt for it. He figured it would make the men hunt just a little harder. Those where the days of 14 men in camp and always at least one tag so this was not a problem. We are different today, but meat, potatoes and vegetables still remain the menu, we just take meat with us, just in case!!!!
Dad makes a pretty good stew and I add the dumplings. His granddaughter Katie liked it so well she would oft for another round of it for breakfast everytime he makes it.
If and when a deer is harvested it is tradition that heart and liver will be on the menu for that night.

In days gone by they would sometimes have a camp cook, usually one of the older fellows that still wanted to participate in the hunt but was too old to hunt. They served a pretty good fair in those days cause there wasn’t anything else for him to do during the day but cook. They dined on good wholesome food and homemade baking fresh from the old cook stove oven. Today we all hunt so everyone pitches in and fixes dinner after the days hunt. We still eat pretty darn good.

In one sentence what makes our camp so special

Our camp is my whole upbringing, it’s a legacy left for all the future generations to share, love, and live by, built by two great men with a dream.

pictures emailed

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

http://www.amtelecom.net/~ubetfarm/
Pictures, songs,stories of Our Camp. I hope you enjoy your visit.

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Jean-
Nice camp!

How did you hear about getting your camp featured in Field and Stream?

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

greetings: I read it on the home page of Field and Stream. I have submitted to field and stream in the past for turkey pictures, moose calling, and an article about women in the world of hunting.
Jean

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from tttitans wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

So, who are gettin their camps in the mag?

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

If i got our Camp featured in F&S it is unlikely i'd be welcome back. That said, we are all fans of the magazine, but like to keep a lower profile. Especially the camp elders,...can't piss them off!!!!

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from tttitans wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Know what ya mean there!

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

What happens in camp stays in camp! Wholly smokes, you want to get me in trouble?

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from tttitans wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Our camps favorite trdition is to get around and sharpen our knives and oil our guns.
There was this deer feeder out on our land that someone else had put there. We didn't like the thought of someone else baiting on our land, so we decided to move things around a little. We took that feeder and we put it about 100 yards south of where it was at. He found it though. :(
Our most seriously taken camp rule would have to be not to touch the weapons unless EVERYONE is aware it is mobile.
My camps favorite meal is Bisuits and Gravy with hashbrowns, eggs, and beef jerky.
My camp is special because everyone is so close and we all share common likes and dislikes.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I'm pretty sure that our camp is not F&S feature material but we sure have a lot of fun there. Not just during hunting season but all year long.
An OLD mobile home with the orange/brown/red shag carpet that we all remember from long ago. Lots of antlers on the wall and mounts from the 1950's adorn the walls but we do have a new refrigerator and LOTS of cold beer =)
1) we have a tradition of taking buckpole pictures the Sunday after the first week of hunting.
2) Seems like every year the anotomy of a harvested buck shows up in someones blind. eck!
3)Fried fresh venison backstraps and fried potatoes. Cold beer
4) Our camp is special because;
Both guys and girls hunt and gather at night to share hunting stories.
JB

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from Texasrhodes wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

At our deer lease it had always been just the guys. One year they decided to have a "wives weekend." Some of the guys at our lease were lawyers and one was even a judge. Unknown to everyone else, the landowner's son, who none of the wives knew, rode his horse down to the gate and locked it. The wives all pulled up in a train of cars. Mercedes, BMWs, and Jaguars lined the dirt road. The landowner's son rode up to them and started yelling at them "this was wives weekend, you whores gotta leave, no business this weekend." Then he just rode back to camp. This was in the days before cell phones. The wives went back to town (4 miles) and called the camp house. That was the last wives weekend.

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Favorite tradition- Simple Deer Hunting

Prank- 2 days before season. People always want to see if the salmon and trout are running up the creek. A few go down to look. Me and a few others follow. with one in the first group in on the prank. We hide in the brush and wait for his signal. He all of sudden says what is that? Then he runs straight down the creek. The others baffled, start heading back up the hill. That is when we come in. Make a bunch of thrashing noises pretending to be bear. We are wearing dark clothes. we can tell they are getting nervous and start wildy pointing their flashlights everywhere. Finally they shine it right on us, we thought we were busted, but the light stayed and we heard them ask what those objects were. Now really nervous they stared moving real fast back up the hill. After they went out of sight we hustled up a different trail and drove to town, we were supposed to be gone and had parked on the road. They would not have gone down if we wer there. Not the first time we played this joke. When we got back we listened to the story of how they saw two bear that they thought were stalikng them. We let them go all week before letting them in on it.

Rules-Safety always comes first, never have had any kind of accidents in my 20+ years.

Favorite Meal-Anything the camp cook prepares, or you are on pearl diving duty.

Pretty much the same group for 20+ years.

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from madtrapper wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

our deer camp is special becasue well, its the the place were old friends become brothers, and the strangers quickly become friends. our deercamp is actually a college dorm, located in the heart of New Yorks Adirondack mts. Paul Smith Colleges' clinton hall is lovingly known as "deer camp" to the guys that live in it and rest of the college. Deer Camp is an all male, forestry major dorm that holds 35 of us knuckle heads. Cant find your gear? need help dragging your harvest? wann learn a new skill? The guy down the hall most likely borrowed your gear, might be sober enough to help ya drag out your buck, and could possibly know what the heck he's talking about. Sadly We can't keep our guns in the dorm so campus safety has made an "armory" for us. Kitchen, heck no, our deer camp has the hottest grill in the north country where tons of venison, bear, waterfowl, and trout have been bbq'ed while enjoying a few cold ones with the boys. Pranks, c'mon you can imagine the pranks that thirty-five, 18-22yr olds play on each other. We love deer camp, every year we hang our great countries flag in a 120ft "Pinus strobus" behind camp so everyone on campus can see it, and finally we added a buck pole behind clinton where a max of 2 deer can hang awaiting processing in our dormroom. sorry for rambling, but our deercamp is simpley the best, and if you dont agree, well..i'll introduce you to 35 of the meanest, ugliest, hairiest bunch of young (but very skilled) hunters thaty'll convince you otherwise.

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from muskiemaster wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

tradition- on the saturday night we go into town get some chicken then go to a bar and play 6,5,4.

Prank- My grandpa threatened the first year of my hunting that he'd wake me up with a cup of water and I didn't believe him until 5 that morning I lay in bed and was suddenly given a cold wake up after not getting up the first time.

Camp rule- Tie for this one: first is that we practice QDM and the second is you have to go to the outhouse no going right off the steps.

Camp meal- getting chicken at the first night of camp and having eggs, bacon and toast the next morning.

special- Our camp is special because for almost every year the past five years we have new members joining us and experiencing hunting at it's best.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

ok....so I read this again and realized that I missed #3 which totally threw my answers off. The answer to #3 is...you have to come to camp to have FUN and if you come to bit@% and complain, turn right around in the driveway and go away.
Oh and then there is the "has to be bigger than a seven point buck thing but the fun is the rule you HAVE to obey.
JB

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from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

1. Our tradition is to take a leak on the same tree on the way to camp for good luck. it was kind of inadvertent tradition but now we do it every year
2. my cousin can take a paper towel roll and make a sound just like a bear. one night my brother went to go water a bush and my cousin followed him. after finishing his buisness my cousin growled at my brother and the "bear" chased him all the way back to camp
3.dont tell the location of hunting areas and camp
4. nothing tastes better than homemade stew after a long day of hiking!
5.the thing that has always made camp so special for me is the time spent in the trailer with my father uncles grandfather cousins and brother learning who i am where i came from and who i want to be

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from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
Drinks and Cards, and lately we like to sit inside the wall tent next to the wood-stove and watch Comedy's on the DVD player running off the generator. With the extended whitetail season we started having Thanksgiving dinner in camp last year. It was the best Thanksgiving in memory, killed a buck that morning, hung on the pole in time for dinner.
2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
Spotlighting Spot lighters. Seen some guys spotlighting a distant clearcut in the middle of the night, so we fired up our spotlight and hit them with it, their light went out immediately as they sneaked away.
3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Get your lazy butt out of bed and keep the wood stove going, no excuse for a dead fire in the morning.
4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
Thanksgiving, followed a couple nights later using the turkey fryer and leftover grease with a Deep Fry of battered Fish, mushrooms, onions, hush puppies, and whatever else we can batter and fry.
5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special. Spending time in the woods with the best of friends, the best of food, the best of drink, and the best of locations, in the wild mountains of Idaho.
We all hunt hard in extremely rough country in the Mountains of Idaho. We have over the years perfected our craft of Tarpentry to the point we set up a very comfortable, yet simple camp. I look forward to the time spent in late whitetail camp more than anything else throughout the year. There is nothing better....

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from senglund wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Deer Camp is a family tradition for us. It consists of my Dad, his 3 brothers, myself, and now my wife(she hunts too). Deer Camp is usually one week out of early-muzzleloader season in VA. We camp just outside of Lynchburg, VA in Amherst County.

It used to be all of "the brothers" (my dad and his bros) would pull up their trucks and either put up their tents or just sleep in the back of the truck. As the years have gone by, we now pull up our campers and my dad even has a small utility-shed-turned-cabin on the property that he and my little brother (forgot about him) sleep in.

Our family is big on tradition. My grandfather used to pull up his camper just to hang out for the week. When we'd come back to camp after a morning hunt, you could bet that Grampa would be sitting at his picnic table with a rifle leaning against his camper waiting for any unsuspecting deer that would walk by (the brothers had bought him a lifetime hunting license years back). After he passed away, we are sure to always hang his hat on "the tree" in the middle of camp along with a horseshoe. We'd always rub the shoe for an extra measure of luck and still do now.

Honestly, we're not really big on pranks at this point, but after this, maybe we will be;)

One camp rule that we have, and take serious, is to eat well. We follow this to the "t". Meals are almost always hot and everyone takes a turn in cooking. We don't skimp on meals either.

This naturally leads to the discussion of what our favorite meal is. This is hard to decide. Things like meatloaf, hot breakfast meals, homemade chicken BBQ, complete dutch oven meals are all in the competition. It's (at this point) a toss up. Our family has Swedish roots (remember, we're big on tradition) so we will have a Swedish potato sausage (we call it potato blogna). It tastes good, but looks like something you'd rather not bite into. This meal is tied with Golden Hominy Scramble. Enough said on that, I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!

Family is important to us so the time we spend together around the fire telling stories of camping, hunting and fishing trips past and the new memories that we create every year we continue this tradition that we call Deer Camp.

That's our story. Pictures will be submitted soon.

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Our Harvey Hunt Camp

A small clearing, amongst the pine in the middle of 400 acres, my granddad Pete and my dad Pete would stand and plan what would become our treasured camp. It was 1955 and a chain saw was the only power tool they had to use, to start their project, of building our 20 x 40 log cabin. They pitched a tent in the clearing under the trees and called that home until they where done building.

My dad, young Pete had only been out of the hospital for 10 days after having appendix surgery but time was not on their side, they wanted to be able to hunt in that camp come November Deer hunt. Dad remembers, even though it was August they both lay in their beds, thinking the other was asleep and not wanting to awake the other and froze all night. They laughed for many years later saying “ If either of us had of spoke that night we could have got up and made a fire to keep warm”

They took materials into the site by an old homemade tractor. The main body was a KB-3 International truck. The rims where welded onto brake drums. The front tires where 900’s and the back tires where 10 hundreds. They fastened chains to the tires and made the slow trip in several miles through big water holes up treacherous hills, across beaver dams until they reached their destination.
Finishing the camp on schedule they fashioned their own bunk beds, long plank table, benches and a work area for cooking. An old cook stove stood in the kitchen and a box stove sat in the middle of the camp for warmth.
Water was carried by pail from the creek for cooking, washing, and doing dishes. Of course the trusted outhouse was promptly built as well. There was a door at the north end and another at the south end of the camp. I would imagine that granddad and dad thought if there was ever a fire they would escape at either end of the camp.

And this is where my part of the story begins. My dad raised my sister, Karen and I and we where raised at that camp. While the other kids where going on summer vacations and holidays, us kids, were always with dad and granddad at the camp. We were taught to hunt and live in the bush and appreciate and respect the land and the animals.
My most treasured memories where sitting at night, the hissing noise only, of the kerosene lantern, listening to the stories we were so lucky to have forever in our minds. We would learn at a very young age to carry our own gun, trap minnows, go with dad on his trap line to set his traps and bring home the beaver he had caught. We would hunt, work on the camp, cut firewood etc. Sometimes the trail going into camp would be so bad you wouldn’t make it and many a night after dark, with the tractor stuck in a mud hole, you would set to walking the rest of the way to camp. Sometimes we would just go play for hours while dad and granddad worked. Dads favourite saying back then was “ Don’t get wet” he knew that it was hopeless, we would be soaked and trying to dry things by the cook stove. Which reminds me of a story my dad still tells today. I was maybe 4 or 5 and I got wet, Dad wouldn’t let us go back out to play until my boots where dry cause it was late fall and cold. He set them on the open oven door to dry. I remember watching those boots thinking, “they will never dry and I wanted to get back to playing outside. I went over to that cook stove and shut the oven door, with the boots inside. I figured they would dry a whole lot faster with that door closed. No one noticed until the boots melted and the odder of melted rubber gave me away. Well I wasn’t too popular right then and that story got a whole lot funnier as the years went by than it was on that day.

Four generations of hunters (to date) and my dad 74 years young and still hunting. Dad is the only remaining hunter from it’s beginnings but his girls and boys, granddaughter and grandsons carry on the tradition. Dad has taught each one of us, himself, not just the sport of hunting but preserving and caring for our future so we will always have our camp and a place to hunt and lots of game to hunt.

We have a few men that hunt with us and have been there for many years, they are certainly our camp family but I know that my dad’s greatest enjoyment comes from having his kids and grandkids there beside him during the hunt.
In the first years of our camp we had no moose in our country so deer, partridge and bears were the only animals harvested. For about 15 years we now have a moose hunt and have been very successful. I learned to call and pride myself in being able to call for the camp. Dad ponders this and keeps saying however “ If you can call these guys in so close, do you think you could call them closer to camp so we don’t have a dirty job getting them back to camp” He has a point. I have called them into some real holes with nowhere but up on all four sides to get out. I guess I have some learning to do yet.

In the early years our camp tradition would be a big party when the men came home. I have thought about that several times in later years and wondered why these guys, (no girls in camp back then) needed to come home after 2 weeks in the bush and have a party with booze. Anyway that’s just the way it was!
Since my days of hunting everything is a tradition. We try and keep things as old school as we can. We hunt hard all day, enjoy a couple of drinks and talk about the day’s events and always eat well after dark. We hunt whether it’s raining, cold snowing or hot.
And we live by the rule. “What happens in camp, stays in camp”

Camp pranks happen so often that it’s hard to pick one so I will relate one from the first years and one from my days.

It was the late 1950’s and nearing the end of the second week of deer camp. When Gerald Harvey went to sleep one night the rest of the gang wrapped his arms around a block of wood, as if he was hugging it tightly. They then proceeded to take his picture. I can only imagine that the real fun in this picture was when they showed his wife Yvonne.

And my prank story begins with my dear friend Tony Moffat. He has hunted with us since he was 16 years old and is part of the family, but he is relentless with me in getting up and sneaking out of camp early in the morning so he can shoot the first deer or moose. And he usually does, which is really frustrating. The first night of camp he started again, so when he went to bed I handcuffed the two of us together and the gang snapped a picture. I was going to be guaranteed he wasn’t leaving without me. (picture)

Camp rules are just a necessity, and we are no different. A lot of our rules are unwritten but we live by them ensuring the safely of all of us. Gun safely comes first and foremost.
No loaded guns in camp. All guns in the rack at night. Safely in the field to ensure everyone’s life. After these rules the rest are there and we expect anyone in camp to follow them but if someone screws up it won’t get you thrown out or reprimanded too badly. Water must be in for morning, wood box filled every night, no one touches the wood stove except my dad, everyone helps with dishes and helps prepare meals, and my dads favourite “no one leaves their watch until they are called off it” Don’t even think about it!!

Our camp seems to have a strong tradition in our meals. When the camp first started my granddad would not allow no meat to be taken to camp. Potatoes, vegetables, etc but if you wanted meat you would have to hunt for it. He figured it would make the men hunt just a little harder. Those where the days of 14 men in camp and always at least one tag so this was not a problem. We are different today, but meat, potatoes and vegetables still remain the menu, we just take meat with us, just in case!!!!
Dad makes a pretty good stew and I add the dumplings. His granddaughter Katie liked it so well she would oft for another round of it for breakfast everytime he makes it.
If and when a deer is harvested it is tradition that heart and liver will be on the menu for that night.

In days gone by they would sometimes have a camp cook, usually one of the older fellows that still wanted to participate in the hunt but was too old to hunt. They served a pretty good fair in those days cause there wasn’t anything else for him to do during the day but cook. They dined on good wholesome food and homemade baking fresh from the old cook stove oven. Today we all hunt so everyone pitches in and fixes dinner after the days hunt. We still eat pretty darn good.

In one sentence what makes our camp so special

Our camp is my whole upbringing, it’s a legacy left for all the future generations to share, love, and live by, built by two great men with a dream.

pictures emailed

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from colinkearns wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is all really great stuff, everyone! Please keep it coming.

-Colin, F&S Senior Editor

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from country road wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

We have no particular tradition except to be safe and be successful.
The favorite prank is the old stunt where we take a novice hunter out to scout around and show him/her some deer sign such as rubs, tracks, scrapes and scat. Once he has seen enough to know what he's looking at, we find a pile of droppings that we prepared earlier using 'Raisinets' and proceed to determine the sex and age of the "deer" by first sniffing, then tasting the "droppings". Any offer to the novice to share in the experiment is always declined and I've learned some new words from them.
Camp rule: Shoot a doe for every buck and keep the woodbox full.
Camp meal is whatever I put in the Crockpot---venison chili, lasagnae, chicken stew, venison steak stroganoff, etc.
It's special because everybody is anxious to get there and nobody wants to leave. We have a good success rate.

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from klug3 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

My favorite camp tradition is the poker game played before every opeining morning.

Camp rule taken most seriously is be safe with your weapon.

My favorite camp meal is grandpa's venison stew.

What makes our camp special is family.

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from jlmckinney wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
Lighting the Camp Fire. It says welcome Home!

2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
Hide the Toilet Paper! :(

3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Hiding the toilet paper, Safety, and making sure all weapons are cleaned/unloaded/ready to go the next morning.

4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
Camp Taters with Sausage or Steak!

5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special.
Being with friends and family, experiencing the outdoors, and having a good time in the woods!

Semper Fi
God Bless America

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from Christian Emter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

1. Getting up early to make a cafe mocha.

2. One time my dad, our freind Randy went elk hunting. We were hunting in some thick fallen timber. So we told Randy we were going after a bull we had spotted on a distant ridge. So we went down to explore the creek at the bottom of the draw. When we got back to camp we told him we got him but its going to be a hell of time getting him out because its steep and lots of timber was in the way. He said ahhh shit. He said really and we were like ya you didnt hear the gun shots. He said no.... you guys didnt get him. Ya we didnt get him we were just shittin ya.

3. Be safe with all the weapons, and getting some good grub to eat.

4. Chicken Gizzards, steak, or roasting our homemade German sausage over the fire, and top it off with some hot cocoa and no bake cheese cake.

5. Having the family around the fire or fishing a lake together, or when I camp by myself I love siiting by the fire with my thoughts.

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

The best camp tradition is to take a sauna at the end of each night. It just feels good after hunting all day, and it refreshes you for the next day.

No pranks (yet). Although I am a natural born prankster, I have been told no pranks at camp.

Unload your weapon before you walk in the door, and keep tabs on where it is aimed. Otherwise you may not like the next place the barrel ends up.

Our favorite camp meal is on the first night my grandpa brings out pollenta (with lots of cheese and butter) and red sauce and either partridge or venison.

Like every camp I have just read about, family and friends are what makes our camp special.

Out at the hunting camp there is room to breath, space to let your mind be at ease, and a simple lifestyle. Plainly said, this is life in Da U.P., Eh!

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from CMiller92 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Our best camp tradition is playing football on Thanksgiving after the morning hunt or just sitting around and listening to my grandpa tell stories.

The best prank happened when me and my dad were walking back from a morning hunt in a nearby stand. As we were walking my dad saw a deer not more than ten yards to our left. He shoved me out of the way to get a clear shot but it was just a decoy that my grandpa set up to trick us. Everyone was laughing execpt me.

The rule my grandpa takes most seriously is us keeping our things in one spot because it is a small camp with a lot of people. Either that or not to over cook the meat at dinner.

My favorite meal is BBQ ribs and french fries.

Our camp is so special not only because of the hunting or fishing but because of the great friends and family that stay there every fall to enjoy it.

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from Rumrunner wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

There's nothing like pulling up to camp and getting the fire going, the smell of wood smoke brings back years of memories. Splitting wood, more gear than you could possibly use while you're there.

Just about every meal tastes better at camp then home right?

It's been a great place to spend time with family and friends. When my dad died last year he left my brother and I a note that said keep the camp going and you can be sure we will.

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

It is because of the days spent with family at our camp that I appreciate every minute that I get to spend at ours. Our family started out in a little tiny one room cabin that 6 of us piled in to on the weekends. A wood stove kept us warm and a charcoal grill was what we cooked lunch and supper on. Eventually a new camp was built with modern facilities but I will always hold dear the time spent in the "little" camp.
My kids grew up going to my parents camp and saw that it was a gathering place for family and friends, young and old. They learned to pick huckelberries and take walks in the woods. Heck, they even learned how to use the outhouse before the indoor bathroom had running water.
We now own a camp of our own and it isn't the biggest or the most beautiful. In fact my sister told her daughter that "if I guy ever brings you to a place like this....run". But it is our camp and we host many get togethers there. EVERYONE is welcome and lots of fun is had.
I know that it is not always possible but it would be nice if everyone in their lifetime could spend a weekend at camp. No phones, no computers, no time schedule. Just relax and enjoy what the good Lord has given us to enjoy. I guarantee that by Monday they would have a whole different outlook on life.
Best therapy in the world and it is FREE.
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

2Poppa...NO WOMEN!!!! You made me say AWWWWWWWW right out loud.
Are there any women in your member's families that show an interest in hunting???
You have seen my posts and read my stories so you know how much hunting means to me. I have no interest in shopping come November 15th however, if I was left home because I was not allowed at camp...come Monday morning I would have an awesome diamond ring to show everyone at work. =)
I know there are many, many camps that have the no woman rule and that is ok. But I double dog dare someone to tell me I can't come to camp. I always tease the guys that they are just afraid I will show them up on the buck pole.
Have a great weekend.
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

You made me smile...thank you. I could go on and on but I have to tell you a story...imagine that.
One year I sat in a blind down in the swamp and about 10am my husband and one of his buddies walked down to where I was hunting. Standing around they decided it would be funny to pee on the ground out in front of my blind. They laughed and then we all went up to the house.
That night I shot a beautiful 8 point buck...right there where they took a leak. HA...joke was on them.
I am not above leaving my blind to pee in the woods and I throw out a dirty word with the best of them. I love to hunt and I love to have fun and THAT is what it is all about.
Be careful what you throw out there 2Poppa...you just might have a visitor at your camp. And...yeah, I probably could teach the guys a thing or two and one of them would be that women could and would be welcome at your camp.
Us girls have left some cowboys scratching their heads after a week at their ranch. We love to have fun and we know how to do it.
Lighten up guys....we don't have cooties. Kick the dirty books under the bed and have a girls night at camp. Now...I triple dog dare you. Nobody backs down from a triple.
GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN!!!!
JB

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

We do not allow women either, not because we are sexist. The cabin is small and we sleep 10 to 12 men. No real doors on any room. There is a line opening morning for the toilet. We have power, but no running water. We do have a septic field and running toilet, but have to manually flush. The cabin is not women friendly, the women who do go up on different occasions stay out in a tent, because they do not like the cabin. Not many women want to be around a bunch ofmen who have not showered in about a week. It is a time where we do not have to watch our language or our manners as much.

P.S Peeing around stands is not really a big deal IMO

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from Androcles wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Our camp consists of a few small roads, a little snow, a cabin, and as many men (typically family members and close friends) as we can get. Significant others are optional, of course.

1. My favorite camp tradition? Well, I must say I have two. First, every year my father will start counting down the weeks until we head north for "the cabin". "11 weeks" he'll say; I do not believe that even Christmas Eve is as exciting as hearing "1 week!" Second, every year we mark the main beam of the cabin with permanent marker declaring our "kills" to the world, even though sometimes numbers like 2 or 3 do appear. Sorry Dad.

2. The best prank we have ever pulled off? A hard one to answer but I suppose placing a cardboard target shaped like a deer in the woods about 20 yds out back and watching my Dad and Uncle go at it.

3. What camp rule do we guys take most seriously? That definitely has to be no loaded guns in the cabin--ever. Ohh, and no, Mom, I did not forget--knock the snow off the boots!

4. Favorite camp meal? Definitely got be the potato soup that is always simmering on the wood stove waiting for us men to finally give up on "that big one" and come in for a bite.

5. Why is our camp so special? Come with us next year and you will soon see.

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I envy you guys that have a hunting camp. I live in Ohio where you hunt the farm down the road. You sleep at home, meet a few buddies early in the morning then hit the woods. While in stand your always anxious to hear the other guys story. The closest thing to camp we have is when we all meet up after the hunt(we are strictly archery on my farm)and tell our stories spawned from the morning hunt. Most the time we'll just head to my house where we catch up on family and things. Maybe the wife will make breakfast. Most of my buddy's live in the big city and stay the day waiting for the evening hunt. We'll sit around and watch a game and share stories during the day. I know my friends really appreciate hunting my farm and they always fall over themselves thanking me. What they do not know is that I couldn't hunt without them. We have no real tradition. Maybe friendship if you consider that a tradition or the fact that we all take the same stand opening day. Lately my greatest joy has been watching the younger kids take their first deer. I've shot nearly a hundred deer but it's weird how a small 6 pt buck taken by my son last year brought a tear to my eye. We have shot our share of large bucks over the years but the biggest whoops and hollars in my woods come after the young'ns harvest a deer.

Afer my buddy shot a nice buck I slipped the testicles into his coat pocket only to be discovered by his wife a couple weeks later. What's that smell Rick? Ha!
I have one rule. Take no shot until it's time. We do not wound deer. It should be rule number one for all archery hunters. Wait for the shot.

After a long afternoon hunt we all stopped by my house for a beer. We usually turn the tube on to watch a football game. We talk about the days deer action and tomorrow. If we have it, we inhale all the deer jerky we can. It has always been a big competition to see who can make the best jerky. Recipes are top secret.

What's special about my camp? It's in my living room!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

It has been 5 weeks since Colin first posted this and I cannot believe only 22 people have responded. For me it wouldn't be about having my camp featured in the magazine as I KNOW there are far better places than ours.
But it would seem that more people would get excited at the chance to tell the stories of their camp and the traditions that are carried on from generation to generation. Just the opportunity to share the thoughts and memories that are constantly whirling around in my head is enough for me.
It is hard to find a subject that really fires people up but I truely thought this would be one. Guess everyone is different some go for the more political subjects, some for guns and such. For people like me it is the camp, the hunt, the sharing of the stories.
I always say "just think how boring this world would be if everyone was the same". Different strokes for different folks.
Happy Sunday
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I love to look at the old pictures of our camp. The "buck pole, the older model cars. Pretty cool stuff.
Seems like the older we(I) get, the more you appreciate your life and gain a much bigger respect for for what was. I find myself going to antique shops and saying "omg, I remember having that as a kid" or "gee, mom you gave that way or sold it at a garage sale for a buck. Look what they are getting for it".
I remember the gun rack at my dad's family camp that was made out of deer legs bent upwards to hold the gun. I remember the old woodstove that heated the camp we stayed in as a kid and hope to one day build a new camp that will be heated by that same stove.
You are right, family traditions do die hard and I hope the day comes when my kids look back and say "I remember". I'm thinking they are going to say "what the hell did she spend all this money on these mounts for". lol
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

2Poppa, I have a really cool email that I think you would enjoy. How can I get it to you??
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I thought that was so cool how the draped the deer across the top of the car or along the side. No big hopped up pickups for them.
Pretty neat stuff and I often think how awsome it would have been to live "back in the day". We take so much for granted and they took nothing. It wasn't just hunting for them, it was survival. Harvesting an animal meant not only food on the table but the hides meant warm clothing or boots. Probably not much went to waste back then and now the landfills are full. We truely are a spoiled lot aren't we.
Glad you enjoyed the pictures. I'm never sure what is allowed to be posted and what isn't.
G'night
JB

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Like the two of you(Judy Black & 2Poppa), I thought there would be many more people here telling about their camps. I grew up in a family where hunting camp was one of the greatest places on earth, I guess that isn't the way for it any more. At least that is how it appears. I am glad I live in an area where the hunting camp is a second home, or in some cases the first home. Ha, ha, ha! And no matter if I get on the cover of the magazine, I still have the camp to go to. I guess I already won the real prize!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Well said Lou. Our camp is less than a mile from our home but the minute I pull in that driveway I am at a "happy" place.
Guess maybe you are right that camps are not the "thing" anymore and how sad is that? I have wonderful memories of my families camp and now of my own. Makes me sad for those that will never experience camp.
JB

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

OMG you have never had a hobo dinner. It is cooked in a keg with a hole cut in the top. Start with boiling a picnic ham. After about an hour add fresh kielbasa. An hour later add cabbage that has been cut into wedges and wrapped in cheese cloth. On top of that put onions, new red potatoes, carrots, all of which have been wrapped in cheese cloth. Put the cover on and let it cook.
Takes about three hours but a keg full will feed 60 people.
We have a seperate keg that we then cook sweet corn in and you have your complete meal.
The cheese cloth keeps your veggies seperated and makes it a whole lot easier to get them out and put in foil pans.
Serve with some home made bread or rolls and they can use that to soak up the broth.
We do this at least once a fall when the veggies are fresh in the gardens. It is easy and feeds lots. No fuss.
JB

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from LouDaPainter wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Our idea of a hobo dinner is different, yours sounds better! Still wouldn't trade camps though, too many memories. But I am making it my goal to visit as many hunting camps as I can this fall and winter (camps in my area). For years people have been inviting me out to their camps, but I have had no time or desire. This year I make the time. Gonna be great!

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from tttitans wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

So, who are gettin their camps in the mag?

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from Minnesota wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

1.) The buck bottle or coming up with odd names for certain spots.
2.)
3.) Don't divulge the secret spots.
4.) Pasties
5 At deer camp everything outside of hunting is left at the door.

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

At first I didn't think that I would want to have my hunting camp featured in Field and Streams cover story. But after much urging and persuading by family and friends, I thought,why not?

It's not a log cabin with three bed rooms or anything that a reader would find luxurious,but we do have all of the comforts of outdoor living,with electricity.I call that,"roughing it smoothly!"
What we lack in luxury,is made up in great friendship and camaraderie ...unsurpassed.

We hunt on on approximately 110 acres, in Kentucky,mostly fields, a lake,with some timber and a huge thicket of cedars,next to another farm that is approximately 86 acres with most of the cedars cut,as the tops still cover the ground. Both of these parcels of land border a Wildlife Management Area of 900 acres. We also have access to another 33 acres up the road that is not attached to these parcels.

We,mostly myself, sleep in what I call a shanty. When I took my youngest son Bo huntin'for the first time, he said it was "ghetto." His first question was,"where do we shower?" My reply was a"creek out back."

The shanty sleeps two men and a boy, and has electricity that we use for a micro-wave, to warm up the grub, we have prepared ahead of time for opening day,and the days that follow.
We also put up tents,if more guys show up for the huntin' party.

1. What’s your favorite camp tradition?
A tradition that we have started,actually takes place the week prior to opening day. A few fellows would get together and sight in our guns/bows,eat jerky and deer chili,and watch deer huntin' videos. Now it's turned into a ministry,with our church donating over a $1000.00 dollars towards 3-D targets. We get anywhere from twenty to eighty people showing up to eat,fellowship and practice shootin'!

In camp on opening day, we have a tradition that we do every morning prior to entering the field. It's called a smoke-out. We burn leaves in the campfire,while we all stand in a circle praying to God and asking him to bless the hunt, and His Divine protection for all hunters.
The leaf burning also acts as a cover-up.

2. What’s the best prank your camp as ever pulled off?
We aren't to fond of pranks, since guns and ammo, and jokes don't mix.
But one year, a new,young hunter came into camp and got his first buck. We saw him dragging out the deer by the antlers, and told him he had it all wrong. We told him he had to use the bucks ears,so he wouldn't ruin the rack for a mount he wanted.
We let the taxidermist in on the joke a couple of months later,and when he called the owner, he said that his ears "were pulled out" so much that the deer looked like Mickey Mouse.
The young owner of the mounted buck, was so surprised, you could have tipped him over with a feather.

3. What camp rule do you guys take most seriously?
Besides ... if it's brown,it's down?
No women!
Sorry ladies ...

4. What’s your favorite camp meal?
A member of our huntin' party,Smitty, makes the best deer jerky,and has a great recipe for salsa that is out of this world!
He too has the Kentucky State Deer Record, typical.

5. In one sentence, tell us what makes your camp so special.
Our camp is conjoined, and possesses that one common trait and characteristic as all animals in the kingdom,having all of our six senses intact and active,(the sixth, being intuitiveness)gathered in unity,interwoven and hunting in harmony,and finding it profitable and practical, in a cooperative effort, as a living, breathing entity,through the brotherhood of hunters,in the great outdoors,that our God created for our pleasure;single-minded,but still maintaining our own individual, eccentric ways, as huntin'men of the Kentucky woods,as we breathe in from the campfires of our lives.

As I always like to say,"C'mon out Monster!"

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Judy-
I knew before hand that I would get a reply from you.LOL
I hunt with my best friend the first several days and he is adamant about "No Women!" I probably need to ask him why?

Myself? I'm a little skeptical to take my wife,due to the fact she peed under my tree stand the first time I took her.

I only have two kids left in the nest,a 17-year old young man,Bo,and a 15-year old young lady,Tessa.
Bo ... well he is just a hand full and I've tried my very best to convert him.

Tessa?
I did take her bow huntin'once with me,when she was about 9-years old,but she had to pee too. As you can tell,I didn't know that women had to take special precaution,to facilitate the flow properly. At that very moment, 3-does walked within 15-feet of the flow area.After she finished, I realized she had more on her than the ground.
I'm trying to get her,of course her boyfriend too,to go target shootin' ... just to get a rifle in her hands,and get her comfortable with it.

I loved your double-dog dare ... hadn't heard that phrase in a long while.

Heck Judy,after reading all of your posts,you're like one of the guys,but different.You of all women, would most certainly be welcomed in my camp,and most of the guys would probably learn a thing or two!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

buckhunter...I read your post shortly after you wrote it and I have been thinking about what you said.
Those of us that do have camps are certainly blessed and I thank God every day for what I have in my life.
But reading your post, eventhough you don't have a camp you still have hunting in your heart and that is important too. You still share in the comradery, the stories and the celebration of the harvest.
All that and you still get to sleep in your own bed at night. Some would call you lucky =)
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I agree Judy!
I thought by now, I would have read about several dozen different camps, in various parts of the continent. I always liked lookin' at old pictures where they would have the "deer pole" hangin' up with everyones trophy.

I can't help but reminisce.

Well ... if it's to be on the October issue,we'll know soon.
Family traditions die hard!

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Judy-
Shoot me an e-mail at ...
zz2poppa@yahoo.com
Darryl Orr

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Awesome Judy-
That's probably some of the best vintage huntin' pictures I've seen. I noticed known of the men had any camo on,but wore sport jackets for the most part. A few even wore ties!

The lady sportin' the long rifle was almost certainly a protege of Annie Oakley. Some of them 'ol timers and their camps, looks as if they could have handled anything Mother Nature tossed at 'em.

I was diggin' the lace-up boots too. The lucky hunter placed his trophy's anyplace he could on the vehicles,the was a hoot!
Thanks for sharin' Judy!
Darryl

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Lou-
Great point!
Perhaps that is one of the reasons Colin is interested in doing the article, is to generate a desire,even a curious one,that may awaken the next generation, to the idea of camping outdoors, just for the benefit of harvesting a deer,and the fellowship and camraderie that naturally happens.

And Lou,you hit the target,when you said you already won the real prize ... we all have, by just "having" a camp and huntin' ground that we are emotionally attached to.

It just bears a witness,a truth that only a hunter can identify with. It's deep in our souls, and runs through our blood, like the fields and streams we hunt.

Heck ... I just get happy texting 'bout it!

Come September 5th,I'll be tellin' that Monster,to C'mon Out!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I am trying to put together a 3D shoot at our camp and I am so excited I can't hardly sit still. Lots of people, lots of fun and I get to cook a hobo dinner. YEAH!
I love having people at my camp (hope it doesn't rain, not much room) but they can all see the deer that have been harvested and we can all swap stories.
Doesn't take much to get me revved up when it comes to camp, shooting, hunting and cookouts. My husband would tell you that it is "just another reason to have a party".
Like you 2poppa & Lou, we already are winners!
October 1st I will be in my tree just daring that big fella to come in bow range.
JB

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Judy-
What the heck is a Hobo dinner?
Recipe please ...

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

D-A-N-G!

That sure sounds inviting ... I'll bet you get a lot of people in camp that don't want to leave.

Those vittles sound a might tasty!
Thanks for sharin'!

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from Judy Black wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

I cook for a bunch of friends at least three weekends a month...and I love it! Sometimes they just bring burgers or steaks to throw on the grill but most of the time I fill the roaster with "something".
Nobody leaves hungry, that is for sure.
Have a great weekend, it is raining here AGAIN. Went back to work on the ark. =(
JB

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

http://www.amtelecom.net/~ubetfarm/
Pictures, songs,stories of Our Camp. I hope you enjoy your visit.

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from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Jean-
Nice camp!

How did you hear about getting your camp featured in Field and Stream?

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from Jean wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

greetings: I read it on the home page of Field and Stream. I have submitted to field and stream in the past for turkey pictures, moose calling, and an article about women in the world of hunting.
Jean

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

If i got our Camp featured in F&S it is unlikely i'd be welcome back. That said, we are all fans of the magazine, but like to keep a lower profile. Especially the camp elders,...can't piss them off!!!!

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from tttitans wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Know what ya mean there!

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from mark456 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

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from mark456 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Kids get opportunity to gobble up the passion for hunting wild turkey Advice from wildlife managers on where to focus your hunting efforts Wild Turkey Federation, will be the featured instructor at the Mogollon Rim Camp.Tonto National Forest
mark456

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