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Rifles

Best North American big game caliber

Uploaded on January 18, 2012

What do you think the best centerfire cartridge for North American big game is?? I say 30-06.

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Including the brown bear??? If that's the case then I pick the .375 H&H and wish you good hunting with that '06.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Why couldn't it take one down with a well placed shot?

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from fezzant wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Whatever you can shoot well... you can argue all you want about an all-round, do everything round - people can't even agree on the best round for a given species. The simple fact is that there isn't one. Big game in North America runs from small deer to moose, buffalo and bear (under 100 pounds to around a ton). You can't build one round that will be ideal for everything, and so you will always have to compromise between too much and too little if you insit on have one gun for every hunt. You can bring down a bear with a .22, but I wouldn't recommend it. You can shoot a pronghorm with PigHunter's .375 H&H but there won't be much left.

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

http://webpages.charter.net/375magnum/allrd.htm

"The actual necessity for a .375 H&H - or any cartridge of similar or greater power - is quite limited in North America. Brown bear, polar bear, the largest of the interior grizzlies, just perhaps bison, and you've said it all. However, unlike the shorter-ranged and much harder-kicking .416s and larger calibers, the .375 H&H is both shootable and versitale."-- Craig Boddington, American Hunting Rifles, Safari Press (1995), p. 142.

For Alaskan Brown Bears, the "[b]est of all, to my mind, remains the 1912-vintage .375 H&H. It has the reach if you need it - but, and this is more important, it has the knockdown power for close-range work."-- Craig Boddington, American Hunting Rifles, Safari Press (1995), p. 366.

"The beauty of the .375 H&H is simple: you can take every animal on earth with the caliber without ever being over- and only rarely undergunned." -- Peter Hathaway Capstick, Safari: The Last Adventure, St. Martin's Press (1984), p. 97.

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from bruisedsausage wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I would vote 06 as well. As the 375 is better suited for larger game than what is typically around in North America. The 30-06 will take down any animal and do it cleanly. Also it is a very modular platform, it can be loaded down and used to hunt yotes, or loaded up and used on big heavy game. Just my 2 cents.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I would have to choose my Sako A7 in 300WSM.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

.300 - WSM, Win mag, RUM, Weatherby, etc.
7mm Wby, Rem Mag; all about a toss up.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I am with you there, bruisedsausage.

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from dbramley wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I would go with the .300 WSM as well. Although the 45-70 is hard to beat for knockdown

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from dbramley wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I think the .375 is a bit much for North America and is on the small side for Africa. A.416 Rigby or the .338 Lapua which is based off the .416 Rigby would be ideal for Africa

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Hmmmm, then I better tell my brother not to attempt to kill any more Cape Buffalo with his .375 H&H when he returns to Africa this year. His previous experiences must have been a fluke.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Nothing currently inhabiting this planet that a .375 H&H won't knock it's stick in the dirt!

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from Treestand wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I like the .300H&H is my Cup of tea, it has a smooth easy push
much like a 9 1/2# 30/06.

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from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Since the focus is on North American hunting I would delete the 375. Owning this caliber as an all around for the off chance to Hunt big bear might make for a lot of uncomfortable deer hunting around home. Stick with an 06, any of the 300 Mags, or 7mm Mags and you will be a happy camper, even if you hunt an Alaskan brown bear on that once in a life time hunt. I have been lucky to hunt all over creation with many, many calibers, and there is no" one size fits all". If most of your hunting is for one or two species stick with what you like best for them. For example, here is my bear history. One Alaskan Brown Bear with a 375, another with a 338. Two grizzly with a 300 Win Mag. Polar Bear, a 338. Black bear one an 06 one a 7mm Remington Mag. The only one that took more than five steps was the Alaskan Brown shot with the 375. Do not get me wrong I love the 375 have killed tons of game in Africa, a couple of elk and the one bear with this terrific caliber.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

North America, the 30-06.

Alaska, the most common cartridge amongst residence is the 338 Win Mag.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

ken.mcloud said it best!

“So, I think that the superior killing power of larger rounds is largely in our heads.(likely testosterone induced) A flat-shooting round that you can accurately place will produce as many if not more "bang-flop" kills as a heavy caliber round.”
-
On the other hand
-
"We have not heard from Ken McCloud in ages hope he was not carrying a fast stepping small caliber rifle and ran into a testosterone laden elephant that could not spell hydrostatic shock. Just teasing Clay.

Kindest Regards"
-Happy Myles

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Where have you been Clay?

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I would have to agree that the 30-06 is a pretty good "one-size-fits-all". It will take anything on the N.A. continent as long as the range is not too far. The .300 mags give us more range and power for bigger bullets but if you are shooting something real big, the range will be less anyway.

I love the .375 but am cautious about where I use it for deer and coyote hunting. The bullets penetrate trees and keep going. In a highly inhabited residential timber, they might penetrate a couple of houses after going through your whitetail.

I guess that is why I never liked Russian dress making... that "one-size-fits-all" mentality just leaves too many things hanging out on the fringe.

I love seeing Happy weigh in with practical real life experience up the wazzoo! I also love having more than one rifle so I can really enjoy hunting across the wide spectrum of North American game and target shooting to boot.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

What is the max range of a 300 mag

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from Ol Krusty wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Much farther than most of us should shoot. I have taken just one critter with my 300 Win so far, a 3 point buck at 322 yards. I think that I could take elk, moose out to that range without a hitch, but I personally don't shoot beyond 400 yards at game unless its a coyote, or some other varmint. I'm not against long range shooting, its just my preference to try to keep the "hunt" in hunting as much as possible.
As a side note, the old 300 Winchester is one hell of a rifle too. I have shot it alot since I bought it 2 years ago and I love it. I'll never have to worry about having enough gun for anything I'll ever hunt. I think that the newer 300WSM fits into that same category as well.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Krusty I agree with you on your limitations that you put on yourself, I do the same. Too many years, try-focal glasses, medicine induced shakes and the extreme long distance shots are out of the question. 300yds is my max. with my 300WSM. .280 or my .257 Weatherby any of them which will shoot farther than that. I agree with you on the 300 Mags. I have had a 300 Win Mag. and now I have a 300WSM and because I don't shoot any heavier bullets than 180 grains I don't see any difference in the two. My Sako A7 300WSM is the finest firearm that I have ever owned in my lifetime and I have owned a bunch. It is enough gun for everything that I need to do.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

.300 weatherby. has a bit more juice then the .300 win mag and can be used on a brown bear hunt. its overkill for smaller big game like whitetail, but mule deer and up its an optimal choice.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Either of the 300s might be a bit overkill at short range on a deer though.......

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from shane.d.sanders wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i would have to say 300 win as well

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from shane.d.sanders wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i would have to say 300 win as well

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

what do you use a 25/06 for?

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from adkmtnman wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I'd say a 35 Whelen in the hands of a good handloader and rifleman. Power when you need it (close to 2000 foot pounds at 400 yards with a 225 gr. Nosler PT). Flat out to 300 yards which is the long range limit for most of us. Inexpensive non-belted cases. The original poor Man's Magnum!

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from jwallen wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

My great uncle took moose, grizzly, sheep and caribou in the Yukon and Alaska a hundred years ago. He had three rifles. Two 94 Winchesters, one in 30-30 and one in 25-35. The other was a model 92 in 32-20. He used the 32-20 more as a trail gun. Alaska of 100 years ago when two legged predators roamed the goldfield trails. The point is that we generally have way more gun than we need. The 30-06 is plenty of gun but if you are spending $10,00 for a guided brown bear hunt why not jump up to a .338 Win mag or a .375 H&H/RCM class rifle if you can shoot it well. Why limit yourself to just one rifle caliber?

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from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

.338 and the 300 win mag

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from MaineBuck52 wrote 2 years 3 days ago

You know, it's been said many times... but it rings true - Shoot whatever you feel comfortable shooting and can shoot well. With this being said, I would keep the caliber to a minimum of a 7mm/08 or .308 with good ammo. Personally, I shoot a .270 because I shoot it well and the Hornaday SST ammo that I use is very effective on everything from whitetail to moose and black bear.

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from jr9893 wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

300 win mag. can be loaded down for deer sized game and up for elk moose and bears.

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from Heath Henderson wrote 1 year 2 weeks ago

i would feel good about using my 300 win mag on anyanimal in North America

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from all over texas wrote 1 week 5 days ago

I was asking myself this same question, and after reading a while, I've decided that I agree with those that say "shoot what's comfortable and what you shoot well." Put some quality optics on what you enjoy shooting and shoot til you trust it. For you guys hunting all over the world, your probably gonna need several setups. But you can afford it if your going on those hunts.

I hunt mostly Texas white tail. Anything at 250 yards or less down here I've killed with a Browning .243 lever action or a .223 up to 200 yards without problem. I've killed Elk at up to 350 yards in Colorado with a Browning .270 but will admit that was a little light. Currently I hunt with a Mark V 7mm Wby Mag. I've taken 200 lb Texas white tail at 350 yards, Wyoming mule deer at 350, and Wyoming antelope at 550 with this gun without a problem. This cal is great for any animal between 100 - 700 lbs up to 500 yards or further.

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 week 20 hours ago

For questions above... the max range of the .300 Win is about 800 yards for elk sized game using good loads and good VLD bullets. I shoot the .300 Dakota that has a little more umph than the .300 Weatherby and it is good to 1,000 yards with the same good bullets (e.g. 210 Bergers). The range is for the cartridge in a highly accurate 26" 1:10 twist barrel. The rifle or the shooter dictate the range though. If they are outstanding in accuracy and can deliver the bullet into a vital zone, the cartridge will do the job at these ranges.

A 25-06 is one of my favorite cartridges. I use it for everything in the prairie dog to mule deer size range. I sure wouldn't hesitate to take it elk hunting if necessary but it is not optimum for them. It is optimum for prairie coyotes, antelope and deer within 500-600 yards. That is unless you are shooting through so many saplings that you can't see farther than 25 yards. In that case, a .35 Remington does a great job. If the "saplings" are larger than 10" in diameter, I prefer the .375 H&H.

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from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Since the focus is on North American hunting I would delete the 375. Owning this caliber as an all around for the off chance to Hunt big bear might make for a lot of uncomfortable deer hunting around home. Stick with an 06, any of the 300 Mags, or 7mm Mags and you will be a happy camper, even if you hunt an Alaskan brown bear on that once in a life time hunt. I have been lucky to hunt all over creation with many, many calibers, and there is no" one size fits all". If most of your hunting is for one or two species stick with what you like best for them. For example, here is my bear history. One Alaskan Brown Bear with a 375, another with a 338. Two grizzly with a 300 Win Mag. Polar Bear, a 338. Black bear one an 06 one a 7mm Remington Mag. The only one that took more than five steps was the Alaskan Brown shot with the 375. Do not get me wrong I love the 375 have killed tons of game in Africa, a couple of elk and the one bear with this terrific caliber.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

.300 - WSM, Win mag, RUM, Weatherby, etc.
7mm Wby, Rem Mag; all about a toss up.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I am with you there, bruisedsausage.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

ken.mcloud said it best!

“So, I think that the superior killing power of larger rounds is largely in our heads.(likely testosterone induced) A flat-shooting round that you can accurately place will produce as many if not more "bang-flop" kills as a heavy caliber round.”
-
On the other hand
-
"We have not heard from Ken McCloud in ages hope he was not carrying a fast stepping small caliber rifle and ran into a testosterone laden elephant that could not spell hydrostatic shock. Just teasing Clay.

Kindest Regards"
-Happy Myles

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I would have to agree that the 30-06 is a pretty good "one-size-fits-all". It will take anything on the N.A. continent as long as the range is not too far. The .300 mags give us more range and power for bigger bullets but if you are shooting something real big, the range will be less anyway.

I love the .375 but am cautious about where I use it for deer and coyote hunting. The bullets penetrate trees and keep going. In a highly inhabited residential timber, they might penetrate a couple of houses after going through your whitetail.

I guess that is why I never liked Russian dress making... that "one-size-fits-all" mentality just leaves too many things hanging out on the fringe.

I love seeing Happy weigh in with practical real life experience up the wazzoo! I also love having more than one rifle so I can really enjoy hunting across the wide spectrum of North American game and target shooting to boot.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from adkmtnman wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I'd say a 35 Whelen in the hands of a good handloader and rifleman. Power when you need it (close to 2000 foot pounds at 400 yards with a 225 gr. Nosler PT). Flat out to 300 yards which is the long range limit for most of us. Inexpensive non-belted cases. The original poor Man's Magnum!

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from bruisedsausage wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I would vote 06 as well. As the 375 is better suited for larger game than what is typically around in North America. The 30-06 will take down any animal and do it cleanly. Also it is a very modular platform, it can be loaded down and used to hunt yotes, or loaded up and used on big heavy game. Just my 2 cents.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

I would have to choose my Sako A7 in 300WSM.

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from dbramley wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I would go with the .300 WSM as well. Although the 45-70 is hard to beat for knockdown

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from dbramley wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I think the .375 is a bit much for North America and is on the small side for Africa. A.416 Rigby or the .338 Lapua which is based off the .416 Rigby would be ideal for Africa

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Hmmmm, then I better tell my brother not to attempt to kill any more Cape Buffalo with his .375 H&H when he returns to Africa this year. His previous experiences must have been a fluke.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Nothing currently inhabiting this planet that a .375 H&H won't knock it's stick in the dirt!

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from Treestand wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

I like the .300H&H is my Cup of tea, it has a smooth easy push
much like a 9 1/2# 30/06.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

North America, the 30-06.

Alaska, the most common cartridge amongst residence is the 338 Win Mag.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Krusty I agree with you on your limitations that you put on yourself, I do the same. Too many years, try-focal glasses, medicine induced shakes and the extreme long distance shots are out of the question. 300yds is my max. with my 300WSM. .280 or my .257 Weatherby any of them which will shoot farther than that. I agree with you on the 300 Mags. I have had a 300 Win Mag. and now I have a 300WSM and because I don't shoot any heavier bullets than 180 grains I don't see any difference in the two. My Sako A7 300WSM is the finest firearm that I have ever owned in my lifetime and I have owned a bunch. It is enough gun for everything that I need to do.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

.300 weatherby. has a bit more juice then the .300 win mag and can be used on a brown bear hunt. its overkill for smaller big game like whitetail, but mule deer and up its an optimal choice.

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from all over texas wrote 1 week 5 days ago

I was asking myself this same question, and after reading a while, I've decided that I agree with those that say "shoot what's comfortable and what you shoot well." Put some quality optics on what you enjoy shooting and shoot til you trust it. For you guys hunting all over the world, your probably gonna need several setups. But you can afford it if your going on those hunts.

I hunt mostly Texas white tail. Anything at 250 yards or less down here I've killed with a Browning .243 lever action or a .223 up to 200 yards without problem. I've killed Elk at up to 350 yards in Colorado with a Browning .270 but will admit that was a little light. Currently I hunt with a Mark V 7mm Wby Mag. I've taken 200 lb Texas white tail at 350 yards, Wyoming mule deer at 350, and Wyoming antelope at 550 with this gun without a problem. This cal is great for any animal between 100 - 700 lbs up to 500 yards or further.

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Including the brown bear??? If that's the case then I pick the .375 H&H and wish you good hunting with that '06.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Why couldn't it take one down with a well placed shot?

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from fezzant wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

Whatever you can shoot well... you can argue all you want about an all-round, do everything round - people can't even agree on the best round for a given species. The simple fact is that there isn't one. Big game in North America runs from small deer to moose, buffalo and bear (under 100 pounds to around a ton). You can't build one round that will be ideal for everything, and so you will always have to compromise between too much and too little if you insit on have one gun for every hunt. You can bring down a bear with a .22, but I wouldn't recommend it. You can shoot a pronghorm with PigHunter's .375 H&H but there won't be much left.

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from PigHunter wrote 2 years 12 weeks ago

http://webpages.charter.net/375magnum/allrd.htm

"The actual necessity for a .375 H&H - or any cartridge of similar or greater power - is quite limited in North America. Brown bear, polar bear, the largest of the interior grizzlies, just perhaps bison, and you've said it all. However, unlike the shorter-ranged and much harder-kicking .416s and larger calibers, the .375 H&H is both shootable and versitale."-- Craig Boddington, American Hunting Rifles, Safari Press (1995), p. 142.

For Alaskan Brown Bears, the "[b]est of all, to my mind, remains the 1912-vintage .375 H&H. It has the reach if you need it - but, and this is more important, it has the knockdown power for close-range work."-- Craig Boddington, American Hunting Rifles, Safari Press (1995), p. 366.

"The beauty of the .375 H&H is simple: you can take every animal on earth with the caliber without ever being over- and only rarely undergunned." -- Peter Hathaway Capstick, Safari: The Last Adventure, St. Martin's Press (1984), p. 97.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 11 weeks ago

Where have you been Clay?

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

What is the max range of a 300 mag

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from Ol Krusty wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Much farther than most of us should shoot. I have taken just one critter with my 300 Win so far, a 3 point buck at 322 yards. I think that I could take elk, moose out to that range without a hitch, but I personally don't shoot beyond 400 yards at game unless its a coyote, or some other varmint. I'm not against long range shooting, its just my preference to try to keep the "hunt" in hunting as much as possible.
As a side note, the old 300 Winchester is one hell of a rifle too. I have shot it alot since I bought it 2 years ago and I love it. I'll never have to worry about having enough gun for anything I'll ever hunt. I think that the newer 300WSM fits into that same category as well.

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Either of the 300s might be a bit overkill at short range on a deer though.......

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from shane.d.sanders wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i would have to say 300 win as well

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from shane.d.sanders wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i would have to say 300 win as well

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from tybow99 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

what do you use a 25/06 for?

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from jwallen wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

My great uncle took moose, grizzly, sheep and caribou in the Yukon and Alaska a hundred years ago. He had three rifles. Two 94 Winchesters, one in 30-30 and one in 25-35. The other was a model 92 in 32-20. He used the 32-20 more as a trail gun. Alaska of 100 years ago when two legged predators roamed the goldfield trails. The point is that we generally have way more gun than we need. The 30-06 is plenty of gun but if you are spending $10,00 for a guided brown bear hunt why not jump up to a .338 Win mag or a .375 H&H/RCM class rifle if you can shoot it well. Why limit yourself to just one rifle caliber?

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from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

.338 and the 300 win mag

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from MaineBuck52 wrote 2 years 3 days ago

You know, it's been said many times... but it rings true - Shoot whatever you feel comfortable shooting and can shoot well. With this being said, I would keep the caliber to a minimum of a 7mm/08 or .308 with good ammo. Personally, I shoot a .270 because I shoot it well and the Hornaday SST ammo that I use is very effective on everything from whitetail to moose and black bear.

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from jr9893 wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

300 win mag. can be loaded down for deer sized game and up for elk moose and bears.

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from Heath Henderson wrote 1 year 2 weeks ago

i would feel good about using my 300 win mag on anyanimal in North America

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 week 20 hours ago

For questions above... the max range of the .300 Win is about 800 yards for elk sized game using good loads and good VLD bullets. I shoot the .300 Dakota that has a little more umph than the .300 Weatherby and it is good to 1,000 yards with the same good bullets (e.g. 210 Bergers). The range is for the cartridge in a highly accurate 26" 1:10 twist barrel. The rifle or the shooter dictate the range though. If they are outstanding in accuracy and can deliver the bullet into a vital zone, the cartridge will do the job at these ranges.

A 25-06 is one of my favorite cartridges. I use it for everything in the prairie dog to mule deer size range. I sure wouldn't hesitate to take it elk hunting if necessary but it is not optimum for them. It is optimum for prairie coyotes, antelope and deer within 500-600 yards. That is unless you are shooting through so many saplings that you can't see farther than 25 yards. In that case, a .35 Remington does a great job. If the "saplings" are larger than 10" in diameter, I prefer the .375 H&H.

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