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Hunting

.300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum

Uploaded on February 15, 2011

What is the better caliber? Give me your thoughts and opinions. I am planning a trip to Alaska on a combo Caribou/Grizzly hunt and I am interested in bringing a rifle chambered in one of these two calibers. What are your thoughts and comments on them?

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I think there is not a nickel's worth of difference in the two, if you are to believe the ammo manufacturer's tables. The RUM is about 100 fps faster than the Weatherby when loaded with Federal's 180 gr Trophy Bonded Tip. RUM ammo is probably cheaper most places, but both are pretty common. I am not a caribou or grizzly hunter, so I cannot speak to the suitability of either for that game, the grizzly in particular.

Maybe Clay or some of the other experienced Alaska hunters can chime in here.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

For Grizz the chances are, your shot will be less than 150-200 yards the velocity is way to fast for lead core bullets.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Driving a bullet at or above its recommended working velocity will either blowup or have less penetration. Bullets like Nosler Partitions, Barnes or other solid expandable bullets I would recommend. When I was stationed in New Mexico and varmint Hunted all the time on U.S. Army White sands Missile Range. Oryx have been released on the Range and I’ve been told light high velocity rounds like 270 and even 30-06 hardly penetrated the hide, perhaps Happy Myles for African game can give an input. Cannot affirm or deny this, all I can say it’s plausible. Saying this, as for Grizz, you need a bullet suitable for the ultra high velocity for maximum penetration giving hydrostatic shock Which produces remote wounding and bone busting ability.

http://www.nps.gov/archive/whsa/oryx.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Sands_Missile_Range

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrostatic_shock

I hope this helps.

73's & M1A's!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Alaska Guides and Residents preferred cartridge was the 338 Win Mag with 210 grain Nosler Partitions for all game including Brown Bear, "GRIZZLY ON STEROIDS"! 375 H&H were popular, but at that time, there wasn't a good bullet for long range shooting, bullets dropped like a rock and allot has changed since 1990.

Choose your bullets and equipment wisely, spend the extra cash if need be. You just may get only on crack at one and have to make it count. Just making do can cost you the entire trip!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

If you ask me my choice between .300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum, I'd go with a 338 cal myself. My 338 Win Mag served me well!!

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from Cbass wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

If your gun shop of choice stocks both calibers, grope both models. I'd go with the one that feels better to me. As for the Weatherby being more expensive, that will be the case, except for the Vanguard line.

Ballstically, the two calibers are very similar, with the slight edge going to the RUM. If you reload, I'd inquire about case lives of both calibers.

If I were feeding a .30 cal rifle for a grizzly hunt, I would think first about 180 or 200 grain Barnes TSX or 200 grain Swift A-Frames.

Have fun choosing your rifle, and good luck on your hunt!

Cbass

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from BigBboy25 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Either cartridge would serve you well. I'd probably go with the RUM just because I'm not a big fan of Weatherby. Also, the I have a buddy who has a RUM and it shoots really well, I'm also pretty sure Nosler uses it as their standard test cartridge for .30 cal bullets if that means anything to you.

A fast .30 cal is probably be the lightest caliber I'd trust on grizzlies. But I do know a fella who took a grizzly with 7mm STW and a 180 grain Berger VLD and dropped him right there. He said he wouldn't hesitate to use the same cartridge and rifle combo again.

Good luck

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

The cost of ammunition on a once in a lifetime hunt is of little consideration. Think about it! Get what you like. Personally I would go for the WBY, not some odd ball cartridge like the 300 RUM. You could end up with the wrong ammo and have to use it on lemmings. Who came up with multiple loadings of the same cartridge based on what you are going to use it on?

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I too have questioned the practicality of the Power Level I, II, & II for the RUM's. Remington touts a similar POI for the various cartridges. One would need to sight in for each of those loads at longer ranges IMO. If you are not shooting at longer ranges, why do you need such a cartridge anyway?

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, I must have missed something. How did you make the jump from a .30 caliber discussion to a .338 topic? Isn't that like asking for a steak at Red Lobster?

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No, they don't have lobster at Village Inn or Waffle House!

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No disrespect to any of my learned friends on here, but the last Waffle House I was in made me want to make sure my shots were all up to date.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

007 ok one more time, If you ask me my choice between .300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum, I'd go with a 338 cal myself. My 338 Win Mag served me well!!

Talking to Alaska Biologists, Guides, outfitters and those who hunt Grizzly and especially Brown Bear, prefer the 338 cal over the 30. 338 is a better bone buster and leaves a much lager wound channel.

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from Cbass wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, it can't be argued that a .338 Mag will punch a bigger hole than any .30 cal round. The choices listed, however would be just fine, according to Bill Pinnell and Morris Talifson, guides for 30 years on Kodiak (founders of P&T). They stated that .30-06 on up will do in a big brown-with the right bullets. And a good first shot.
It should be stated that they themselves carried Model 70s in .375 H&H.

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from chargeaway wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I looked on Midway USA and they offer a 220 grain buller for the Weatherby and a 200 grain offering for the RUM. Those both seem sufficient to me to take down a Grizzly.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Cbass

True, very true and no argument dar, the 338 Win Mag was and probably still is Alaskans #1 cartridge they can handle with more range than the 375 H&H. I wish I had a dollar hearing Brown Bear Hunters using the 375 H&H returning to the range, if only they had a 338 Win Mag or something with some range, they wouldn't have come home empty handed. The maximum range was 350 yards or less, well within limits of the 338 Win Mag including the 30-06, 375 H&H at that time was known for bruit power at close quarters.

Now granted the availability of "High Coefficient" and design & performance of bullets for all calibers have come along way and I mean a long way!, I will definitely give you credit for that, but it's hard to argue shooting a 338 cal 210 to 225 grain as fast as a 30-06 150 grain with long range performance.

30-06 is no punk either! It's all about bullet placement!!!!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

chargeaway, wouldn't give it a second thought using a 30-06 with 180 Grain Nosler Partitions on Grizzly :)

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

.300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum

Want my opinion!

How much you like to shoot?

Versus

How much money you have and the availability of ammunition anywhere you go!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I've owned a 300 Win Mag, just don't care for 30 cal Magnums anymore :)

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, no debate as to the many virtues of the .338, I was just curious how you jumped over to it when it wasn't included in the original question. Focus, old son!

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Well said WAM.

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

either will do what you want it to do with a good shot and at least 200 grains. i'd take the weatherby.

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from CJ wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Focus? He's been Foc'd up forever!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

007

It's called experience my friend.

If you were in a gun store and the fella behind the counter recommended a Ruger mini-14 in 223 to a Woman buying a rifle for her Husband for Moose hunting, would you say, YA'THAT'S IT! Don't think so. True story by the way :)

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from shane wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I'm with Clay on this one. If you're going on a caribou/grizzly hunt, you probably want a .338.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

both of those calibers are suitable for grizzly and caribou, when Jim Shockey was a guide in grizzly country he carried a .300 weatherby mag. on a different note my dad killed his grizzly with a .375.

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Just noticed this post, sorry to weigh in late. Have used extensively the 300 RUM, the 300 Weatherby, the 300 Win Mag, and the 338Win Mag on all types of big game. However my experience with the 300 RUM has only been in Africa where I took more than a dozen head of various animals. The other calibers have used all over the world including Alaska and Canada.
Most people I know seem to be interested in the 300 RUM for it's high velocity and purported accuracy with a 180 grain bullet for long range sheep hunting. I, traditionally had preferred the old 200 grain Nosler in my various 300 Mags. I felt the huge case capacity of the RUM would make it ideal, so had two custom made. I quickly discovered both rifles had vicious recoil, far from the claimed accuracy, at least in my hands, and lastly my two are temperamental to handload. The nail in their coffin so to speak was Barnes coming out with their 180 grain Triple shock which replaced my need for the 200 grain Nosler Parttion.
The 300 Weatherby I owned was never as accurate as any one of the 300 Win Mags I own, so just sort of stopped using it. Wish to emphasize, Most of my experienced big game friends around the country all love their 300 Weatherbys. I have had amazing luck using the 300Win Mag, but that is just me.
Lastly, if I were to return to Alaska specifically for caribou and grizzly would take one of my 338 Win Mags. Have taken several of all species of Caribou my experience was the range was never much over 200 yards and easy task for that caliber, and it is a great bear rifle.
In closing, if my choices had to be only a 300 RUM or a Weatherby 300 would not lose any sleep over the decision, either will do fine.

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Post Script
You may end up hunting other game than bear and caribou in Alaska, somewhere else in the world. If your resources are now limited, any of the 300s give you more flexibility than the 338. I am sensitive to the issue that the 338 was not in the beginning a part of this topic, but it did come up, since I do have considerable experience with the caliber felt it was important to include. Kindest Regards

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Do not mean to turn this into a shaggy dog story, but after rereading, fill I should explain my early interest in the 200 grain 30 caliber bullet. I hunt all over the world, and have found am often with one rifle, even though I may have brought several. I have discovered may be stalking one animal and ending up making a quick choice on another. A 300 Mag makes the quick choice easier with a heavy bullet. Big animals it put down well, small animals it does not seem to blow to pieces as often happens with lighter bullets Additionally the heavier bullet seems to behave better at close range as well as long Newer bullets by many manufactures seem to help prevent this old problem. Any questions will be happy to address. Again best to all

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from chargeaway wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

I guess a follow up question would be what are some good accurate for hunting rifles for each of these calibers. I have heard good things about the Weatherby Vanguard Sub-MOA as well as the Mark V. Also the Remington XCR II for the RUM. What do you guys know?

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

There is not much difference in these powerful cartridges but in chosing between these two, I would go with the RUM for a little more velocity and smoother feeding (non-belted case). Working up an accurate load can be tough for the RUM but it can be done. I use a .300 Dakota for RUM speed and improved accuracy. I have been very pleased with that but realize it is a rare cartridge and not everyone's cup of tea. If I were making the choice for your hunt in a 30 caliber, I would actually choose the .30-378. It is a monster cartridge but gives you the most power and the longest range with better accuracy than either the RUM or the .300 Wby. My buddy got one for an Alaskan hunt and I favor it almost as much as my .300 Dakota. Last Fall, he shot a Dall sheep at 400 yards and a mountain caribou at 727 yards (we practice at long range a LOT and he is very accomplished at this range). He used 180g Nosler partitions but they really begin to lose energy at 700 yards. After shooting a lot of high velocity 30 calibers, I highly recommend the Berger HUNTING 210g for long range accuracy and power on the caribou and Barnes TSX for the bear. Using 180s, he had to shoot his mountain caribou 4 times to knock it down... all good shots. Your bear hunting will be close but your caribou could be at long range. All of these top speed 30 calibers have recoil unless you have a heavy rifle or a muzzle brake. With a muzzle brake, my buddy's 30-378 is a puppy to shoot. You can't make a mistake with any of these great cartridges, just make sure you get a good scope capable of solid long range accuracy. We use Leupolds and are quite happy with those. Good luck on your hunt!

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

i own a mark V in .300 weatherby. i think there built better then any off the shelf remington model. though the weatherby was quite pricey im 100% pleased with the purchase. hopefully in the future this gun will put some led in a few elk, mule deer, and anything else i need it to bring down.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Happy Myles,

We are always pleased to hear your stories. BTW, how's that book coming?

b/r
WAM

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Just noticed this post, sorry to weigh in late. Have used extensively the 300 RUM, the 300 Weatherby, the 300 Win Mag, and the 338Win Mag on all types of big game. However my experience with the 300 RUM has only been in Africa where I took more than a dozen head of various animals. The other calibers have used all over the world including Alaska and Canada.
Most people I know seem to be interested in the 300 RUM for it's high velocity and purported accuracy with a 180 grain bullet for long range sheep hunting. I, traditionally had preferred the old 200 grain Nosler in my various 300 Mags. I felt the huge case capacity of the RUM would make it ideal, so had two custom made. I quickly discovered both rifles had vicious recoil, far from the claimed accuracy, at least in my hands, and lastly my two are temperamental to handload. The nail in their coffin so to speak was Barnes coming out with their 180 grain Triple shock which replaced my need for the 200 grain Nosler Parttion.
The 300 Weatherby I owned was never as accurate as any one of the 300 Win Mags I own, so just sort of stopped using it. Wish to emphasize, Most of my experienced big game friends around the country all love their 300 Weatherbys. I have had amazing luck using the 300Win Mag, but that is just me.
Lastly, if I were to return to Alaska specifically for caribou and grizzly would take one of my 338 Win Mags. Have taken several of all species of Caribou my experience was the range was never much over 200 yards and easy task for that caliber, and it is a great bear rifle.
In closing, if my choices had to be only a 300 RUM or a Weatherby 300 would not lose any sleep over the decision, either will do fine.

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Post Script
You may end up hunting other game than bear and caribou in Alaska, somewhere else in the world. If your resources are now limited, any of the 300s give you more flexibility than the 338. I am sensitive to the issue that the 338 was not in the beginning a part of this topic, but it did come up, since I do have considerable experience with the caliber felt it was important to include. Kindest Regards

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from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Do not mean to turn this into a shaggy dog story, but after rereading, fill I should explain my early interest in the 200 grain 30 caliber bullet. I hunt all over the world, and have found am often with one rifle, even though I may have brought several. I have discovered may be stalking one animal and ending up making a quick choice on another. A 300 Mag makes the quick choice easier with a heavy bullet. Big animals it put down well, small animals it does not seem to blow to pieces as often happens with lighter bullets Additionally the heavier bullet seems to behave better at close range as well as long Newer bullets by many manufactures seem to help prevent this old problem. Any questions will be happy to address. Again best to all

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I too have questioned the practicality of the Power Level I, II, & II for the RUM's. Remington touts a similar POI for the various cartridges. One would need to sight in for each of those loads at longer ranges IMO. If you are not shooting at longer ranges, why do you need such a cartridge anyway?

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from Cbass wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

If your gun shop of choice stocks both calibers, grope both models. I'd go with the one that feels better to me. As for the Weatherby being more expensive, that will be the case, except for the Vanguard line.

Ballstically, the two calibers are very similar, with the slight edge going to the RUM. If you reload, I'd inquire about case lives of both calibers.

If I were feeding a .30 cal rifle for a grizzly hunt, I would think first about 180 or 200 grain Barnes TSX or 200 grain Swift A-Frames.

Have fun choosing your rifle, and good luck on your hunt!

Cbass

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, I must have missed something. How did you make the jump from a .30 caliber discussion to a .338 topic? Isn't that like asking for a steak at Red Lobster?

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from CJ wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Focus? He's been Foc'd up forever!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

007

It's called experience my friend.

If you were in a gun store and the fella behind the counter recommended a Ruger mini-14 in 223 to a Woman buying a rifle for her Husband for Moose hunting, would you say, YA'THAT'S IT! Don't think so. True story by the way :)

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I think there is not a nickel's worth of difference in the two, if you are to believe the ammo manufacturer's tables. The RUM is about 100 fps faster than the Weatherby when loaded with Federal's 180 gr Trophy Bonded Tip. RUM ammo is probably cheaper most places, but both are pretty common. I am not a caribou or grizzly hunter, so I cannot speak to the suitability of either for that game, the grizzly in particular.

Maybe Clay or some of the other experienced Alaska hunters can chime in here.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

For Grizz the chances are, your shot will be less than 150-200 yards the velocity is way to fast for lead core bullets.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Driving a bullet at or above its recommended working velocity will either blowup or have less penetration. Bullets like Nosler Partitions, Barnes or other solid expandable bullets I would recommend. When I was stationed in New Mexico and varmint Hunted all the time on U.S. Army White sands Missile Range. Oryx have been released on the Range and I’ve been told light high velocity rounds like 270 and even 30-06 hardly penetrated the hide, perhaps Happy Myles for African game can give an input. Cannot affirm or deny this, all I can say it’s plausible. Saying this, as for Grizz, you need a bullet suitable for the ultra high velocity for maximum penetration giving hydrostatic shock Which produces remote wounding and bone busting ability.

http://www.nps.gov/archive/whsa/oryx.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Sands_Missile_Range

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrostatic_shock

I hope this helps.

73's & M1A's!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Alaska Guides and Residents preferred cartridge was the 338 Win Mag with 210 grain Nosler Partitions for all game including Brown Bear, "GRIZZLY ON STEROIDS"! 375 H&H were popular, but at that time, there wasn't a good bullet for long range shooting, bullets dropped like a rock and allot has changed since 1990.

Choose your bullets and equipment wisely, spend the extra cash if need be. You just may get only on crack at one and have to make it count. Just making do can cost you the entire trip!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

If you ask me my choice between .300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum, I'd go with a 338 cal myself. My 338 Win Mag served me well!!

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from BigBboy25 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Either cartridge would serve you well. I'd probably go with the RUM just because I'm not a big fan of Weatherby. Also, the I have a buddy who has a RUM and it shoots really well, I'm also pretty sure Nosler uses it as their standard test cartridge for .30 cal bullets if that means anything to you.

A fast .30 cal is probably be the lightest caliber I'd trust on grizzlies. But I do know a fella who took a grizzly with 7mm STW and a 180 grain Berger VLD and dropped him right there. He said he wouldn't hesitate to use the same cartridge and rifle combo again.

Good luck

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

The cost of ammunition on a once in a lifetime hunt is of little consideration. Think about it! Get what you like. Personally I would go for the WBY, not some odd ball cartridge like the 300 RUM. You could end up with the wrong ammo and have to use it on lemmings. Who came up with multiple loadings of the same cartridge based on what you are going to use it on?

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No, they don't have lobster at Village Inn or Waffle House!

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No disrespect to any of my learned friends on here, but the last Waffle House I was in made me want to make sure my shots were all up to date.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

007 ok one more time, If you ask me my choice between .300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum, I'd go with a 338 cal myself. My 338 Win Mag served me well!!

Talking to Alaska Biologists, Guides, outfitters and those who hunt Grizzly and especially Brown Bear, prefer the 338 cal over the 30. 338 is a better bone buster and leaves a much lager wound channel.

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from Cbass wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, it can't be argued that a .338 Mag will punch a bigger hole than any .30 cal round. The choices listed, however would be just fine, according to Bill Pinnell and Morris Talifson, guides for 30 years on Kodiak (founders of P&T). They stated that .30-06 on up will do in a big brown-with the right bullets. And a good first shot.
It should be stated that they themselves carried Model 70s in .375 H&H.

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from chargeaway wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I looked on Midway USA and they offer a 220 grain buller for the Weatherby and a 200 grain offering for the RUM. Those both seem sufficient to me to take down a Grizzly.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Cbass

True, very true and no argument dar, the 338 Win Mag was and probably still is Alaskans #1 cartridge they can handle with more range than the 375 H&H. I wish I had a dollar hearing Brown Bear Hunters using the 375 H&H returning to the range, if only they had a 338 Win Mag or something with some range, they wouldn't have come home empty handed. The maximum range was 350 yards or less, well within limits of the 338 Win Mag including the 30-06, 375 H&H at that time was known for bruit power at close quarters.

Now granted the availability of "High Coefficient" and design & performance of bullets for all calibers have come along way and I mean a long way!, I will definitely give you credit for that, but it's hard to argue shooting a 338 cal 210 to 225 grain as fast as a 30-06 150 grain with long range performance.

30-06 is no punk either! It's all about bullet placement!!!!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

chargeaway, wouldn't give it a second thought using a 30-06 with 180 Grain Nosler Partitions on Grizzly :)

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

.300 RUM or .300 Weatherby Magnum

Want my opinion!

How much you like to shoot?

Versus

How much money you have and the availability of ammunition anywhere you go!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I've owned a 300 Win Mag, just don't care for 30 cal Magnums anymore :)

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from 007 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Clay, no debate as to the many virtues of the .338, I was just curious how you jumped over to it when it wasn't included in the original question. Focus, old son!

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Well said WAM.

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

either will do what you want it to do with a good shot and at least 200 grains. i'd take the weatherby.

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from shane wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I'm with Clay on this one. If you're going on a caribou/grizzly hunt, you probably want a .338.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

both of those calibers are suitable for grizzly and caribou, when Jim Shockey was a guide in grizzly country he carried a .300 weatherby mag. on a different note my dad killed his grizzly with a .375.

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from chargeaway wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

I guess a follow up question would be what are some good accurate for hunting rifles for each of these calibers. I have heard good things about the Weatherby Vanguard Sub-MOA as well as the Mark V. Also the Remington XCR II for the RUM. What do you guys know?

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

There is not much difference in these powerful cartridges but in chosing between these two, I would go with the RUM for a little more velocity and smoother feeding (non-belted case). Working up an accurate load can be tough for the RUM but it can be done. I use a .300 Dakota for RUM speed and improved accuracy. I have been very pleased with that but realize it is a rare cartridge and not everyone's cup of tea. If I were making the choice for your hunt in a 30 caliber, I would actually choose the .30-378. It is a monster cartridge but gives you the most power and the longest range with better accuracy than either the RUM or the .300 Wby. My buddy got one for an Alaskan hunt and I favor it almost as much as my .300 Dakota. Last Fall, he shot a Dall sheep at 400 yards and a mountain caribou at 727 yards (we practice at long range a LOT and he is very accomplished at this range). He used 180g Nosler partitions but they really begin to lose energy at 700 yards. After shooting a lot of high velocity 30 calibers, I highly recommend the Berger HUNTING 210g for long range accuracy and power on the caribou and Barnes TSX for the bear. Using 180s, he had to shoot his mountain caribou 4 times to knock it down... all good shots. Your bear hunting will be close but your caribou could be at long range. All of these top speed 30 calibers have recoil unless you have a heavy rifle or a muzzle brake. With a muzzle brake, my buddy's 30-378 is a puppy to shoot. You can't make a mistake with any of these great cartridges, just make sure you get a good scope capable of solid long range accuracy. We use Leupolds and are quite happy with those. Good luck on your hunt!

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

i own a mark V in .300 weatherby. i think there built better then any off the shelf remington model. though the weatherby was quite pricey im 100% pleased with the purchase. hopefully in the future this gun will put some led in a few elk, mule deer, and anything else i need it to bring down.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Happy Myles,

We are always pleased to hear your stories. BTW, how's that book coming?

b/r
WAM

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