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Big Game Hunting

The effective killing range of a bow...

Uploaded on August 20, 2009

I am amazed by the new bows that are being very long distances with the right set up. What do you think is the effective range of bows shooting above 300 fps?

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from lawman328 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I guess that would depend on the shooter! I will shoot out to 40 yards only if the animal is at ease. I practice out to 50yds but I can't ethicly shot that far at game. Yet!!! I don't think the fast bows are really for distance as much as its the fact that you shoot so fast that the deer don't have as much time to react, therefore a better chance of hitting where you were aiming.

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from jjames wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with lawman about the speed part. I practice out to 70 but won't take that far of a shot at lice game. I have killed a few at 50 but would prefer to haev a 40 or under. And a lot depends on the shooter and the confidence they have. The first deer i killed at 50 was with an old pse that only shot 240 fps But i had confidence in the shot and had practiced it a million times in the offseason. I don't think you need a fast bow to shoot long distances to a certain extent.

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from Kentucky Hunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I have taken 2 deer at 60 yards with my bow it shots around 292 fps last time it was graph shot but i would always rather have 20 or 30 yard shots .but i want rule out the long range shot if its a clear of obstruction . but i shot 60 yard shots all the time in our 3d club events and im confident in my arrow placement at that distance

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from swilmot1 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Its simple... A correctly placed shot in the vitals at 10 yards or 50 yards are both just as effective as long as you are confident in both your bow and yourself. Practice makes perfection!

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

differenet for every shooter. For me 40yds tops.

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from Archery 101 wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I think that a good effective range is right around 30 yards.

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from codynicker wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

todays fast bows could easily kill just about any north american big game up to 80 yards easily

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I'm an accomplished tournament archer and I rarely take a shot in the field over 30 yds. I don't care how fast your bow is your target is still small, alive, moving or angled.

I think I have posted this before. What you can do on the range or in your backyard has little to do with hunting wild game in the field.

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from rootju wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

I shoot a PSE X-force, and feel confident to place a shot on an animal out to 70 yards. Not saying I would ever take a 70 yard shot, but I can make it. However 50 yards is very doable...

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Like buckhunter I too was an accomplished tournament archer and for these events we shoot out to fifty yards at unknown yardages. I'm very comfortable with my ability to judge distances and rarely lost a tournament. That being said I believe that for living game the closer,within reason,the better. I really like to set my shots up around 30-35 yards. The animals are much less likely to react to a string twang or the slight sound of an arrow as it is drawn over a rest at this yardage and the shot at this distance is simple. I detest the 10-15 yard shot with a passion and usually won't even try to draw my bow.

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from shane wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Your ability to hit a stationary non-living target at 50 or 60 yards doesn't equate one bit to your ability to ethically kill game animals at that distance. Animals move, and have plenty of time to do so while your arrow is traveling. You may be confident on foam out to 50, but you sure as hell can't be confident that your quarry won't move. Then you have to factor in all the sticks leaves and twigs that are not in your line of sight but are within the rainbow trajectory that your arrow follows on these long shots.

Bowhunting is a 30-35 yard deal, no matter the new technology. Don't push it. If you want to get really real, try a recurve or longbow.

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from bthomasb1 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I agree with libertyfirst i also set my stands at 30-35 yards for the same reasons.All situations are different and you have to use your best judgement within your capeabilities and morals if your shooting a hunting arrow 300 plus with a sharp broadhead and you hit him broadside double lung shot your bow will kill that deer at a farther range than anyone should ever shoot,so if your worried about the bow doing its job it will,i watched a guy on tv shoot a wounded elk at 100 yards thru the ribs,they NEVER should have showed that but it proves the bow will do it job.

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from Don Gutierrez wrote 1 year 52 weeks ago

I am an 11 year devoted bow hunter and in my experience I have made some bad shots, we all have, but the experience is not coming from how many perfect shots you have made at long distances, it comes from how much you have learned by making the bad shots. I started out shooting 20 yrds for hours at a time, then moving up 30, 40, and testing out 50 and 60yrd shots. Over the years I have lost many arrows and have lost a few deer. I am now able to make a solid decision on shots that I know I can make, which is depended on wind speed and direction. a good archer can judge the weather pattern to compensate where the arrow will hit. if a person feels good about shoot at 30 yards then thats what they should shoot. If they can shoot 60yrds and hit consistently, then they should be able to make the call during a hunt if they feel the target/deer is in a good shooting position. I push my self to shoot 60-80yrd shots because I practice with 300 shots every week just to stay in tune with my shots. I feel better shooting longer shot then I do 30 yrd shots. I don't know why but making a 60-70yrd shot just gets into hunting more than anything. I feel every bow hunter should push themselves to their max and to challenge every inch of their ability in bow hunting or bow target shooting, because bow hunting is a sport that not everyone can pick up on, so be the best archer that you can be. You should make every shot count. The animal gives it's life for our pleasure. Bow hunting is a pleasure and privilege so make it count. Shoot what yardage you feel good about, and make good choices on yer shots. thanks fellow bow hunters for helping each other out. stay safe. In memory of my brother!! we miss you..

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from Clay Cooper wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

buckhunter

You crack me up!

What is a accomplished tournament archer ?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdpaulus wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

I too have shot competitions and shoot constantly at 70-100 yards. However no practace or competetion can compare to the same conditions of hunting thus I would never try a shot over 40 yards and that is only if the wind is dead and the shot is perfect. Otherwise 20-30 would be ideal. Yes shots have been made at 50 or 60 yards but knowing a bow ands its limits when hunting is important and the national archery classes will teach to take no shot over 20 yards when hunting game. That can be stretched but is a good point to make. Remember it is hunting, not bragging rights, or killing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdpaulus wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

P.S. no target can replace the adraniline or feeling when it comes time to make a real shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Lubetkin wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

The question most people are answering is..." What is the effective killing range of the average archer ?" rather than the equipment( bow and arrow) . My question is more related to the equipment At what range would a field point lose it's ability to do harm to an animal ?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I'm an accomplished tournament archer and I rarely take a shot in the field over 30 yds. I don't care how fast your bow is your target is still small, alive, moving or angled.

I think I have posted this before. What you can do on the range or in your backyard has little to do with hunting wild game in the field.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Archery 101 wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I think that a good effective range is right around 30 yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Like buckhunter I too was an accomplished tournament archer and for these events we shoot out to fifty yards at unknown yardages. I'm very comfortable with my ability to judge distances and rarely lost a tournament. That being said I believe that for living game the closer,within reason,the better. I really like to set my shots up around 30-35 yards. The animals are much less likely to react to a string twang or the slight sound of an arrow as it is drawn over a rest at this yardage and the shot at this distance is simple. I detest the 10-15 yard shot with a passion and usually won't even try to draw my bow.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Your ability to hit a stationary non-living target at 50 or 60 yards doesn't equate one bit to your ability to ethically kill game animals at that distance. Animals move, and have plenty of time to do so while your arrow is traveling. You may be confident on foam out to 50, but you sure as hell can't be confident that your quarry won't move. Then you have to factor in all the sticks leaves and twigs that are not in your line of sight but are within the rainbow trajectory that your arrow follows on these long shots.

Bowhunting is a 30-35 yard deal, no matter the new technology. Don't push it. If you want to get really real, try a recurve or longbow.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjames wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with lawman about the speed part. I practice out to 70 but won't take that far of a shot at lice game. I have killed a few at 50 but would prefer to haev a 40 or under. And a lot depends on the shooter and the confidence they have. The first deer i killed at 50 was with an old pse that only shot 240 fps But i had confidence in the shot and had practiced it a million times in the offseason. I don't think you need a fast bow to shoot long distances to a certain extent.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from swilmot1 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Its simple... A correctly placed shot in the vitals at 10 yards or 50 yards are both just as effective as long as you are confident in both your bow and yourself. Practice makes perfection!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

differenet for every shooter. For me 40yds tops.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lawman328 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I guess that would depend on the shooter! I will shoot out to 40 yards only if the animal is at ease. I practice out to 50yds but I can't ethicly shot that far at game. Yet!!! I don't think the fast bows are really for distance as much as its the fact that you shoot so fast that the deer don't have as much time to react, therefore a better chance of hitting where you were aiming.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kentucky Hunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I have taken 2 deer at 60 yards with my bow it shots around 292 fps last time it was graph shot but i would always rather have 20 or 30 yard shots .but i want rule out the long range shot if its a clear of obstruction . but i shot 60 yard shots all the time in our 3d club events and im confident in my arrow placement at that distance

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rootju wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

I shoot a PSE X-force, and feel confident to place a shot on an animal out to 70 yards. Not saying I would ever take a 70 yard shot, but I can make it. However 50 yards is very doable...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bthomasb1 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I agree with libertyfirst i also set my stands at 30-35 yards for the same reasons.All situations are different and you have to use your best judgement within your capeabilities and morals if your shooting a hunting arrow 300 plus with a sharp broadhead and you hit him broadside double lung shot your bow will kill that deer at a farther range than anyone should ever shoot,so if your worried about the bow doing its job it will,i watched a guy on tv shoot a wounded elk at 100 yards thru the ribs,they NEVER should have showed that but it proves the bow will do it job.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Gutierrez wrote 1 year 52 weeks ago

I am an 11 year devoted bow hunter and in my experience I have made some bad shots, we all have, but the experience is not coming from how many perfect shots you have made at long distances, it comes from how much you have learned by making the bad shots. I started out shooting 20 yrds for hours at a time, then moving up 30, 40, and testing out 50 and 60yrd shots. Over the years I have lost many arrows and have lost a few deer. I am now able to make a solid decision on shots that I know I can make, which is depended on wind speed and direction. a good archer can judge the weather pattern to compensate where the arrow will hit. if a person feels good about shoot at 30 yards then thats what they should shoot. If they can shoot 60yrds and hit consistently, then they should be able to make the call during a hunt if they feel the target/deer is in a good shooting position. I push my self to shoot 60-80yrd shots because I practice with 300 shots every week just to stay in tune with my shots. I feel better shooting longer shot then I do 30 yrd shots. I don't know why but making a 60-70yrd shot just gets into hunting more than anything. I feel every bow hunter should push themselves to their max and to challenge every inch of their ability in bow hunting or bow target shooting, because bow hunting is a sport that not everyone can pick up on, so be the best archer that you can be. You should make every shot count. The animal gives it's life for our pleasure. Bow hunting is a pleasure and privilege so make it count. Shoot what yardage you feel good about, and make good choices on yer shots. thanks fellow bow hunters for helping each other out. stay safe. In memory of my brother!! we miss you..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdpaulus wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

I too have shot competitions and shoot constantly at 70-100 yards. However no practace or competetion can compare to the same conditions of hunting thus I would never try a shot over 40 yards and that is only if the wind is dead and the shot is perfect. Otherwise 20-30 would be ideal. Yes shots have been made at 50 or 60 yards but knowing a bow ands its limits when hunting is important and the national archery classes will teach to take no shot over 20 yards when hunting game. That can be stretched but is a good point to make. Remember it is hunting, not bragging rights, or killing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdpaulus wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

P.S. no target can replace the adraniline or feeling when it comes time to make a real shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Lubetkin wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

The question most people are answering is..." What is the effective killing range of the average archer ?" rather than the equipment( bow and arrow) . My question is more related to the equipment At what range would a field point lose it's ability to do harm to an animal ?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from codynicker wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

todays fast bows could easily kill just about any north american big game up to 80 yards easily

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

buckhunter

You crack me up!

What is a accomplished tournament archer ?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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