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Hunting

The Coyote--to Shoot or Not to Shoot. That is the Question.

Uploaded on February 06, 2009

All:

I live out in the country on a few acres in NE TX. On clear nights, I frequently hear coyotes sing their songs all around the area in which I live. (Natural Surround Sound, indeed.) I know the approximate location of two or three dens, but I leave them be. I enjoy listening to the coyotes' music. It gives me comfort.

The wild hog population in my area is almost out of control. I have come across evidence that the coyotes hunt piglets and small pigs. I have also come across evidence that the local coyote population is increasing, perhaps in part because of the plentiful Happy Meals (for the coyotes) inherent within the pig population.

At one point some years ago, and strictly at my daughter's request, she and I raised tiny little chicken chicks and turkey babies on our land. The chicks and turkey babies grew and multiplied until the local coyotes became aware of their presence. The coyotes then began staging raids at night, and eventually grew so bold as to stage raids in the daytime. I personally have had the less than joyful experience of hearing terrified squawking noises at dawn, of throwing on my bathrobe and running out the side door with my 12-gauge, and of then slipping and falling flat on my face on the wet dew grass while a coyote with a turkey baby in its mouth nonchalantly trotted by 20' away--I swear the coyote appeared to be grinning--and lackadaisically wandered off with its meal.

I admit it: the coyotes killed and ate every one of our chickens and turkey babies. I killed quite a few coyotes along the way, but the coyotes won that particular war, there's just no doubt about it.

I suspect, but have never seen it yet, that coyotes come into my garage at night and help empty the food bowls I feed my dogs with every night. (The bowls are empty every morning, no matter how much food I put in them.) I have personally seen my ancient Australian Cattle Dog "hang out" with coyotes on my property (as if they were all school kids in conversation outside a Starbucks), though I could hardly believe my eyes. My dogs appear to have no concern whatsoever about the local coyotes, and vice-versa.

Tonight, about 45 minutes before sundown, as I was turning my car onto the country road in front of my house to take my daughter into town for a school dance (yes, on a Thursday night, of all things), she stopped looking at herself in the mirror long enough to spot 3 large coyotes in my neighbor's cattle field across the road from my house. I know the distance from my driveway to every tree and every fence in my neighbor's field. The coyotes were 200-225 yards away. I stopped the car and looked. The coyotes looked right back at us. They were strong, fit, almost fat, very healthy, right around 40lbs each.

Years ago, my neighbor gave me permission to shoot any coyote I see on his property.

I have walked my neighbor's 300+ acres in the day and the night on many occasions over the last several years. When there is a full moon and the weather is decent, particularly in the winter when the moonlight and starlight reflects well off the ground, I enjoy going on night hikes in the hills of my neighbor's ranch. On numerous occasions under full moonlight and clear skies I have seen coyotes approach and pass right through my neighbor's cattle herd--even when there were calves only a few weeks old in the herd--and never disturb or bother a single cow or calf, ever. The coyotes are not interested in my neighbor's cattle, and the cattle ignore the coyotes as if they are invisible. I was stunned by this the first few times I saw it. It was certainly not what I ever expected to see.

There was a .257 Roberts in the trunk of my car tonight, along with handloaded ammo for it--I had planned on going to the rifle range today but never made it. I probably could have gotten the rifle out of the trunk, chambered a round, and taken out at least one coyote, had I chosen to do so.

But I did not. First, it is illegal to shoot from a public road in TX, which is where my car was at the time my daughter and I stopped to look at the coyotes. But even if I take into account that it is a completely empty rural road and that no person was on it except for us, and even if it had been legal to do so, I still would not have taken a shot.

As far as I can tell, the coyotes in my area aren't causing any harm to anyone at this time, and are hunting wild pigs, which is a good thing. And I find myself unable to kill any animal these days unless there is a really good reason to do so.

To Shoot or Not to Shoot; that is the Question. I answered the question by not taking a shot. But what would all who read this do in your respective areas across the country, and why, or why not?

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All Replies
from idduckhntr wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

like you i have no desire to shoot coyotes but just like whitetail they need to be managed i will only shoot them on my yearly camping trip and always cull at least 3 they are good to have around but if you get to many you might as well have a pack of wolves hope this helps

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I don't stop to think, I get out pop the trunk load my rifle and start shooting. After that I starting shooting pigs to help control there population.

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from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

In the are I live and work in, Northeast GA the yotes are out of control. Cattle farmers loose at least 3 or 4 calves a year from packs of yotes. Our family has about 100 chickens that we raise for meat and eggs. We usually loose around 20 chickens a year from yotes alone. They also reek havoc on the deer population, I have personally seen yotes kill 2 fawns in the spring while on the tractor. I will tell you nothing will make you madder than watching a yote kill a helpless fawn and you not be able to do anything about it. I say shoot them whenever you see them.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

In an environment in which coyotes pose no problem, I normally take a "live and let live" attitude toward them, since they have their niche in the ecosystem and their job to do. When they become a problem, it's entirely appropriate to trim the population back.
You comment on a situation in which you did not take what would have been an easy shot, and I compliment you on your hunting ethic and self-discipline. I infer you wanted to obey the law and did not want to risk a ricochet that would have hit your neighbor's cattle. If local laws permit (i.e., if coyotes are classed as "vermin" in your state or county), you'd do well to position yourself purposefully to comply with the law but provide a good position for a shot. I suspect after the first or second coyote bites the dust, subsequent shots will be noticeably more difficult because the coyotes will give you and your rifle obvious respect. They will regard your scent as an enemy as move much more cautiously. I believe the opportunities you now witness as easy shots will disappear as the coyotes' instinct for survival recognize you as a threat. On the other hand, they find it difficult to pass up an easy meal.
If you seriously intend to impact the coyotes, and it's legal to do so, you may want to trim back the wild pigs as well.
I had a small piece of property in SW Colorado in Archuleta County (near Pagosa Springs), and the coyotes did nothing to a rancher's beef cattle, but they caused havoc to the lambs on a sheep ranch that was almost an adjacent property. I'm not going to get into the "sheep vs. cattle" issue here, but the pickings were easy for the coyotes and that had to stop.
I consider coyotes the prince of varmints, and five of my rifles were purchased and accessorized with coyotes in mind, but my .22-250 has the best record to date. I'd wish you and your family were spared the loss of those chickens and turkeys, but when you get a bushel full of lemons, it's time to make lemonade. Maybe the "consolation prize" would be some superb varmint shooting! And I wish you every success on that.

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Thank you T.W.D. for your very interesting post. It obviously took a litlle more effort than bantering around 'which is better a 30-06 or a .270'. OK, to shoot or not to shoot. I would shoot. Why? Honestly, because I just couldn't resist it.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Folks . . .

In TX coyotes are indeed considered vermin. It is legal to shoot them without any kind of license or permit. My neighbor--the gentleman who owns the cattle ranch--shoots them whenever he sees them. He has also poisoned them in the past, a practice I do not agree with and will never follow, for many reasons.

Several years ago I took a coyote on my neighbor's property. It was summer, hot, breezy, near midnight under a brilliant full moon. My daughter and I had been hiking in the hills for a mile or so, meandering here and there, exploring, very quietly conversing, when she whispered that she thought we were being followed by something.

There are mountain lions where we live.

As fast as I could without making any serious mistakes, I chambered a round in my .270, flipped the safety off, turned us both to face our rear, and put my daughter behind me and off slightly to one side with my Beretta 92 in her hands, safety off, ready for double-action fire. We slowly started walking backwards in the same direction we had been heading.

A moment later my daughter squinted and pointed with her chin. A young coyote, maybe only a year or two old, clearly visible in the moonlight, was tracking us about 175 yards out. I put the Beretta back in my holster with its safety in the ON position. I flipped the safety on the .270 to its ON position, too, but kept the handload in the chamber.

My daughter and I continued our little trek. The coyote would jog a few paces along our trail and then stop and stare, then jog a few paces more and stop and stare again. It would raise its nose up in the air and sniff for us and attempt to catch our scent, but the breeze was never steady and varied gently from all compass directions.

We--my daughter, myself and the coyote--kept this up for a good five minutes or more. My daughter and I were as fascinated by the coyote and its behavior as the coyote was by us and ours. I am fairly sure the coyote was trying to rationalize in its brain something that was completely foreign to all of its brief life experiences: two large biped creatures traveling slowly in the night, deep in its territory for no apparent reason.

I looked around. I didn't see any cattle or anything else of value within a reasonable field of fire toward the coyote or beyond it. I raised the rifle to my shoulder, flipped the safety off, looked through the Leupold scope, put the crosshairs just behind the coyote's shoulder, and pulled the trigger. The coyote went down instantly. It never even twitched.

A minute later my then 11-year old daughter approached the coyote as it lay in the grass. We knelt. She gently petted the coyote and stroked its fur. Then she broke down and cried and petted the coyote some more and pulled it to her and held it in her arms. She raised her head and looked accusingly at me, tears pouring down her cheeks. I felt awful. No explanation I made or offered held any water with her. And her counter-argument was brutally short and effective: "Dad, you had no call to kill this coyote that wasn't doing anything to anything."

I think my young daughter on that night was smarter and wiser than I was. On that night I think she was right.

TWD

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I see, "and that" as the great radio announcer Paul Harvey would have said "is the rest of the story!"
I understand completely.

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I almost forgot, "Good day". It's been alot of years

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Thank you for your comments, summit, and for understanding. By the way, I do completely understand the near irresistability of taking a shot at a coyote, having felt the urge on many occasions myself.

And thank you for your comments and insights, too, Mr. Palumbo. Much appreciated and always welcome.

Thanks to both of you.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

One of these days those coyotes will tire of pork and go after something different. If they are so bold as to not only come onto your property but into your barn/garage its time to take a few out just to instill fear. I believe this is the same rational and argument sportsmen in Ca. are using to try and establish a season for cougar. The cat is becoming to bold and has lost its fear of humans.

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Just for the record, I UNDERSTAND T.W., but AGREE with Jim in Mo.

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Like summit said I understand but I wouldn't be very happy if it were my chicks and turkeys they had killed. When I was 11 I had an understanding of stuff like this I realize its harder to do with you daughter in the car but I would take every opportunity to reduce the coyote population

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from teufelhunden wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

As a youngster (1980's) we had a rabbit problem. It was nothing to see 40 or 50 in just about every field you looked. I never saw a coyote in those days. Over perhaps the last 10-15 years the rabbits have disappeared replaced by large packs of coyotes. I usually try to kill at least 10 a year. I do not want to erase the coyote population (I know that is impossible), but I would like to have the rabbits, as well as quail and ringneck pheasant that used to call this area home, start to return. I know several people that have had their small dogs killed by the coyotes but never have any of my labs been harmed.

Coincidentally, In the days of rabbits, quail, and pheasant we also had a multitude of nutria. On fishing trips in the marsh, in the rice canals, or just about any other body of water they were very abundant. The Alligators were few and far between. I have not seen a nutria in this area in past 15 years. I have alligators running out my ears. When they lose their fear of humans things go south in a hurry. Most of my old swimming holes are useless. I can not run a topwater lure or buzzbait across any of the ponds or rivers or canals or lakes in my area without the gators attacking it. I took my young daughter perch jerking the other day and every time her bobber moved a small gator would bite the bobber.

That was off topic I know. I was looking for parallels to what happens when the population of any species go unchecked.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

All . . .

Have no worries . . . if I see a coyote in my garage or barn or on my property, and if I can safely and legally take it out without putting a hole in or through anything other than the coyote I'm aiming at, I assure you I will do so . . . but probably not when my daughter is around.

By the sounds of their howling at night, I estimate there are at least a dozen coyotes who live within 3/4 mile of my house. The three coyotes I saw the other day looked so healthy and vigorous I suspect they are purloining not just from my dogs' food bowls, but from many others in my rural neighborhood, too.

(It is probably not entirely a coincidence that there are very few, if any, domestic-size wild or semi-wild cats in the area. Haven't seen one in months. I think the coyotes have eliminated them. )

Mr. Teufelhunden, I gather that you are most likely in Florida. Is there any way that you and your fellow hunters and fisherman can legally (and significantly reduce) the alligator population in your area? For instance, if you and your fellow sportsmen got together with the game wardens in your area and sought permission from the State for a special culling hunt (or several), could such a hunt (or hunts) be achieved?

Thank you for your comments, all. Much appreciated.

TWD

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from teufelhunden wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Mr. Davidson,
I am actually in Texas. We have a season in early Sept. It lasts 2-weeks and the regulations for getting tags are quite cumbersome. Many counties including mine are also starting a spring season and loosening some of the restrictions. The problem is that the alligator is so closely removed from the endangered species list that many do not realize the problem.

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from peter wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

i love coyotes and coyote hunting. if the population is rising who should hunt some what to control it before it gets out of hannd because sibnce you live on private land there is nobody to hunt the coyotes and the population could get big quick

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from Happy Myles wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

"As the last human is dying, and staring up at the sky, staring down at him will be a cockroach and a coyote", said a weathered old sheep rancher".

I love coyotes. They are trying to make a living like the rest of us. So don't take it personal. They exist, but behave somewhat differently, on each of the three ranches we've owned in various parts of the West. In California, they would snatch a half born calf from the mothers body. In Idaho, they coveted sheep. In Montana, they ignored the calves, and stalked rodents through the snow, and along creek banks, at least, until the wolves moved in and killed the coyotes. The wolves were a lot harder on the livestock too.

The coyotes look for the easiest prey, and I feel are trained to predate differently by their parents in various parts of country.

Be that as it may I'll always love The Son's Of The Pioneers sining Blue Shadows On The Trail, with coyotes yodeling in the background.

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from Happy Myles wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Should have been singing, not sining, excuse me Roy Rogers.

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from burnettjv wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

My grandpa inheirited 90 acres from his sister about 15 years ago in South-Central Oklahoma. That place used to be excellent for cottontails and even had a decent quail population. In fact, I went on my first hunt on that 90 acres with a .410 single shot. Last November I walked that 90 acres and there was not a rabbit or quail to be found. However there was coyote scat EVERYWHERE! and I heard several groups of coyotes howling and yelping in broad daylight. I say start shooting and drop as many as you can.

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from steve182 wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Due to the boldness and abundance of this particular population, i can't understand why you are not shooting. Must you wait til your pets and/or family are threatened? As a deer hunter, I'll always shoot a coyote. Perhaps you are not a deer hunter. As far as leaving the cows alone, coyotes would only attack such large prey if it had an advantage,...say the prey were on its side giving birth. Coyotes routinely prey on calves and fawns in this way, and sometimes the mothers too. Also, why not be a good neighbor and dispatch a few for his sake? That .257 is great for dogs, almost a shame not to put it use. But to each his own. If your consciensce says dont shoot, don't shoot. I'll be shootin'

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Steve182 . . .

The coyotes around my area of NE TX pose no threat to my pets and certainly no threat to my daughter or me. Several years ago I observed (from a range of about 20' while I was attempting to get my face out of the mud and grass where I had tripped and sprawled) a large coyote casually trot right by me with one of my chickens in its mouth. (There are no chickens on my property these days.)

I have personally seen my old Australian Cattle Dog (Blue Heeler) stand nose-to-nose with a coyote with the tails on both creatures wagging happily. My dogs appear to "know" the local coyotes and vice-versa. Everyone appears to get along just fine. One exception is that the coyotes stay out of the field where my jackass lives. Although Jackson the Jackass likes my dogs just fine, he doesn't like the local coyotes and will kick them or bite them if they are foolish enough to venture within his range.

All . . .

Early this morning, after a rare restless and mostly sleepless night, I was awoken from a very deep sleep by the unmistakable, piercingly loud bark/howl of a coyote that sounded like it was right outside in my front yard. It was that loud. I stumbled out of bed, threw on my bathrobe and my flipflops--I'm sure I made a very pretty sight, grabbed my .257, and stumbled out the door. I was so groggy that my vision was blurry and I could barely see.

The coyote barked/howled repeatedly. He sounded really close. I looked around but didn't see him. Confounded, I looked up into my neighbor's cattle fields and finally detected a microscopic dot 450 yards away. The dot moved. I picked up my rifle and looked through its temporary 4.5x scope at the dot. It was the coyote, looking back from where he had come from, barking madly at something that bothered him which I could not see. I chambered a round and rested my rifle on top of the steel horizontal fence beam and framed the coyote with the crosshairs of my scope. The wind blew strongly in my direction, but at a slight cross-wind angle, magnifying the coyote's incessant barking/howling. The coyote began trotting.

I calculated the shot. A richochet may have deviated off at a 30 degree angle and hit cows that were about 700 yards away. The wind made for a difficult lead adjustment, and the coyote was trotting at about 10 mph at an angle away from me, complicating the lead adjustment. Plus, although I had just personally zeroed the scope the day before, a 4.5x magnification scope on a long shot against a trotting coyote means you've got your crosshairs on a tiny moving dot. It would have been a 500-520 yard shot by the time I pulled the trigger. Although I knew the drop trajectory of my rifle to an intimate degree--about 32" at 500 yards with my handloads--and although I possibly could have made the shot, I couldn't bring myself to pull the trigger. It just wasn't worth it. Plus, a part of me admired the coyote for having the balls--or the stupidity--to be in broad daylight 500 yards away from me barking his head off for well over 90 seconds.

It's true: If the coyote had been at 200 or 300 yards with no ricochet or field of fire issues, I would have taken the shot. And I would have made it, a quick, humane, instant lights-out kill. But that wasn't the situation I was given this morning.

I have no regrets, nor have I ever had any regrets, about a shot I chose not to fire.

TWD

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from Bella wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Coyotes are not native to Massachusetts, yet we got em. I have only seen em twice but they are common enough that the state instituted a season on em. I ain't had no issues with em yet though. In season with the right conditions I certainly would shoot a 'yote and taw his fur too.
As 'Yotes aren't native to New england but wolves were (before we exterminated em all)I suspect that the 'yotes are filling in the "wolf" niche in the ecosystem.
Supposedly the last catamount in Mass was shot in 1899 and poor kittys tattered taxydermyied remains are in the Boston Museum of Science basement. Supposedly, that is because I have talked to 4 persons who have seen what they were convinced were mountain lions in the past few years. The State however is still in denial. One of my minor nightmares involves me having to shoot a painter off'n one of my sheep or goats.
As far as the 'yotes went the State was in denial about them too till they started showing up as road kill.
Aside from the sanctity of my goats and all I am happy to have coyotes, catamounts, bears and other preditors in the woods, they are hallmarks of a heathy ecosystem with all of its components in place. But I'll still shoot one if it is in my sights and legal. It is always best to not have regrets...

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from DakotaMan wrote 5 years 1 week ago

You show commendable self discipline and I applaud you! In most areas I have lived, coyotes periodically became overpopulated and posed a problem to wildlife and domestic stock. In these situations we lost hundreds of chickens and therefore hunted them on site. But coyotes like all of God's creatures are important cogs in nature. We have to be sensible about conserving the balance of nature. If they are not over populated I let 'em run. It is good to hear their music in the evening and they are amazing to watch with their team hunting. I dread seeing the federal game wardens putting out their poison to eradicate them but realize that at times it becomes necessary. I have rarely seen them bother cattle/calves but they are hell on pigs, sheep, chickens and turkeys. I can remember once, when a house guest from Boston went bersek seeing a small pack of coyotes kill a fawn. They wanted me to shoot it because it was killing a deer. They didn't realize that coyotes do that for a living day in and day out. As a result, our deer population gets stronger over time. I love hunting them but I do give them a chance, even in the worst of times. I also remain careful about shooting in populated areas and use highly frangible bullets. My .223 Bushmaster and 25-06 are hard to beat when coyote control is necessary. Calling them in is a blast and really helps you control the situation in populated areas. I have been able to call them within 10 yards so buckshot will do the trick.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I hope your daughter didn't pick up a mess of fleas or lice from your coyote. Petting a dead coyote indeed!

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from hunterkid94 wrote 5 years 12 hours ago

i cant even get a pic of one on my motion cam!!!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

25-06 works great on both hogs and coyotes!

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from bigajvigs wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

To T.W. Davidson,

I have raised chickens on my families farm since I was 8 years old, and each year we loose a good number of them to coyotes. I have been woken up to many times to hear horrible screams from my chickens as they are dragged off to be eaten. They got so bold as to show up in the daytime looking for an easy meal. Being it as my family owns 23 acres of land I had no problem in trying to reduce their population, which has gotten out of hand in Connecticut (there have been over 6 attacks on pet dogs, 2 in my town, let alone all the dead cats I find half-eaten on my property). I have watched these dogs walk up to my chicken coop at night and work on finding a way in to get their meal, and by watching them I came to respect them for their cunning ways of solving problems. I had a pair sniff out a foothold trap I had set to try to catch them: The 2 yote's stopped, sniffed the ground, and gently nudged the ground where I had the trap under some leaves, in doing so the one coyote tripped the trap! They then urinated on my trap and by that point I knew I was about to loose some more chickens so it took 2 well placed head shots from my 22LR out of the window to stop that threat.

Coyotes do have some serious balls, I have seen them watching the UI men at work at night from a mere 10 yards away, just sitting there watching as the men worked. One even walked right up to my dad one morning when he was leaving for work, he thought it was a dog at first then when it got 10 feet away he realized it was a coyote and began to yell for me to come outside. I have a great respect for their cunning, but will not hesitate to drop one on my property if they show up.

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from jlfreeborn wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I'm central NC, and we're starting to get covered up with them. I shot one about 4 yrs ago that was getting ready to snack on my dead deer. Yall oughta see what a .308 does to a yote!!! That yote took a dirt nap!

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I've been called a story teller for what I'm about to print here, but this is the absolute truth. About five years ago I was driving on a main drag and saw a doe with her fawn in the corner of a green field. I'm always interested in the condition of all of the wildlife I see so I decided to take out my field glasses to see how the deer had done over the winter. While I was watching the two deer, a huge coyote, and I mean huge, trotted out into the field. I had my 22 mag. with me (as I always do)and this would be a easy shot of approximately 75-80 yards. I fully expected the coyote to chase and kill the fawn. The doe was very alert to the coyote but showed no sign of panic and the fawn continued to eat and to only occasionally look at the coyote. The coyote, for his part,simply looked at them once and then continued to wander in a sort of slow trot around the field and then come to a locked rigid stance. He then jumped straight up into the air with all four feet and tried to land on something. The doe and her fawn seemed to have no fear of this animal. The coyote continued to jump up and land exactly in the same manner and I finally realized that he was toying with a field mouse or mole. I watched this event unfold for about 18 minutes and then the coyote after having eaten the rodent slowly trotted off into the bushes.The doe continued to look in the direction that the coyote had gone but only briefly and occasionally. The deer were still feeding there when I left. I'm not trying to make any statements with this story only to supply information.

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from uwurst wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I got to say that I believe the coyotes eat way more deer fawns than they do the piglets. The hogs eat every turkey nest they encounter, but the 'yotes do to. A coyote or two probably doesnt do much harm, but no matter how hard you try or how many you kill there will always be a couple. So my advice: WHACKEM AND STACKEM! The hogs and dogs!

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from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

i say eat the hogs your self and kill every coyote you have the chance to . get your daughter a cat and see how long it last with them around . the coyote is the only animal i can kill with a big smile on my face and never feel bad about doing it .

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I'm of the opinion that you can't hurt the coyote population once they are well established. The hound guys in Maine hunt them hard and they still are everywhere. You can hear them howling virtually every night where I live. You can't walk over fresh wet soil on my property without seeing new tracks. The only coyotes that I've shot that have had deer hair in their stomach are the ones shot in winter. Those that I've shot in spring and summer are usually full of moles,mice, birds etc. The hound men think that I'm crazy and say that most of the coyote they take are full of deer, summer, winter,spring and fall! I'm being cynical here but I question their findings because it is so radically different from my own. I do know that my property always has healthy and plentiful fawn populations and at the same time plenty of coyote activity. I base what I say on the taking of around 20 coyote. The hound hunters will sometimes take three in the same day and they get together to hunt at every available opportunity. They have literally shot hundreds.

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from ggmack wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

it up to you. if you see them as a problem shoot them. from what you say though i would leave them alone. they seem to be controling the pig population. i see wild pigs as more of a poblem compared to coyotes that only eat chicks and baby turkeys.

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from 270WSM wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I WOULD SHOOT THE COYOTE THEN GET READY FOR A BBQ AFTER FINDING SOME OF THOSE PIGS YOU MENTIONED.

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from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Shoot the coyotes and the pigs. The coyotes are probably unfriendly to the rabit population and livestock. And the pigs can kill crops and livestock.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

TW, sooner or later as those Yotes get bigger,fatter and bolder, your labs and of Aussie pup will become a victim, then any livestock you own will too. Have you EVER shot a living breathing thing other than the coyote that got too close to you & your daughter? I think not.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Moishe . . .

First, I have no labs. Second, my old Australian Cattle Dog passed away several months ago . . . of old age, not because of any threat by any coyote.

About killing . . . I've done quite a bit of it in my time. Like some others with a military background who read and write in these blogs, I've had extensive training in killing. For those reasons, among others, I prefer to avoid doing any more of it unless critically necessary.

I've never once regretted a shot I didn't take. And I plan on keeping it that way.

TWD
USMC,1984-92

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

T.W.... Well done sir. thankyou

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Touching stories, but NATURE is a cruel teacher. Hunters know this.
I have always killed animals for a purpose, whether to eat it's flesh or wear their pelts. We humans are the top predators on the food chain, and that will never change. I am not saying we should kill with reckless abandon, but humans have altered nature so we must act responsibly in it's stewartship which means killing animals to help control their population; a bullet is much more merciful then Nature. Period. I don't have all the answers , but I do know thinking life as a Disney movie is not the answer either.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

there would of been led flying out of my gun barrel so fast it would of sounded like a machine gun going off but thats just me i hunt predators and coyotes disgust me cause they kill whatever they can and eat whatever they can in colorado they are everywhere in the mountains on the plains and in the cities the farmers and ranchers here welcome people who hunt predators with open arms cause they kill calves goats sheep chickens not to mention the pheasant populations

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from ms175503 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

i wouldn't have taken the shot. i'm too paranoid about a neighbor or cop seeing me and going to jail. besides we are the apex predators get out in the field and hunt, don't rely on dumb luck to beat the wiley coyote. take a sighting as accidental scouting and plan another time to come back and hunt.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

NE Texas,not far can help waging war!

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

This thread was started in Feb. of this year and a lot has happen with the coyote population here in my part of Maine. They are everywhere. I've shot 5 and should have had another today if I'd been paying attention. He saw me way before I saw him and all I got a look at was the ass end hightailing it out of my sight. What is the determining factor in coyote population? Someone mentioned that the population is directly related to the rodent crop and I suspect that this may be true. They certainly are an interesting animal to hunt and very alert to everything around them.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

We have a saying at camp, but i doubt it's appropriate to post here. It is as follows..."Shoot that @^%$%&^#*%$?!"

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

All . . .

A friend of mine in a rural county about 50 miles away from where I live in NE TX has a deer lease in woods and fields on a few hundred acres. A cattle ranch borders the lease. There are plenty of deer and pigs in the area.

My friend told me he went out to his lease to do a little maintenance and prep work for deer season. He came across a tiny calf, probably only a day old or so, that appeared to have been killed and half-eaten by coyotes. Later that day, my friend espied no less than 6 coyotes--he thought they were all from the same pack--in the vicinity of the dead calf. Unfortunately, at the time my friend saw all these coyotes, they were not in a good field of fire position for my friend to eliminate a few of them.

Later in the day my friend retrieved a wounded rabbit electronic call from his vehicle, set it up not far from his deer stand, and activated it. Within a few minutes he saw several coyotes, though none presented a good shot opportunity. Then he saw a coyote stick its head out of some shrubbery and brush on the far side of an open field. The brush and shrubbery was so thick that my friend could not see the coyote's body, but the coyote's head was clearly visible. My friend quickly took his Model 70 .243 loaded with 85-grain Barnes TSX handloads (going out the muzzle around 3200 fps), got a good rest, lined up his scope on the coyote's forehead, right between the coyote's eyes--a damn small target at long range--and squeezed the trigger. The coyote instantly vanished from sight, but my friend thought he heard the bullet strike home. My friend quickly paced off 308 yards across the field and found the coyote on the ground exactly where it has been standing. The bullet had hit about 2" to the right of where my friend intended, but otherwise made for a perfect head shot and instant kill. (My friend was somewhat awed by the TSX bullet; the bullet penetrated most of the length of the coyote before exiting and was not recovered.)

I intend to join my friend on his lease and help him get rid of some coyotes. It is apparent that there are too many of them in that area and they need to be thinned out before they kill any more calves. I am perfectly okay with eliminating some coyotes under conditions like this.

TWD, 28 September 2009

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I think I am going to buy a small game tag in CO if I get an elk early in the week and hit the BLM land nearby and whack some song dogs with my Bushmaster.

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from silvrtung wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

KILL 'EM ALL!!! i have lost my favorite bird dog to mange th=at he picked up from a tustle with the head honcho coyote near my house. my prize was a single shot bull barrel .223 and since last christmas i have been putting the fear of god into any wild dog i see.

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from thuroy wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Shoot the coyotes. With a population that high it isn't long before they start taking out livestock and your dogs.

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from 60256 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I live in ND and on our property it's a idea of see 'em, shoot 'em. We hate coyotes and they really do no good at all for us except the cool howling noises in the evenings. We have gotten lazy and not hunted them the last couple years, and now there is too many. So this year when we hunted deer, if there was little to no movement, but we saw a coyote, we dropped it right there.

Nate

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from kodnocker wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Do the deer and livestock population a favor. Take a few every year if you get the chance.

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from texasjohn wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Many years ago as a young man I helped clean up a field on a local ranch where a number of calves were killed at birth, along with several of the momma cows. They were killed, in many cases only a bite or two taken, by coyotes apparently teaching their young how to kill. Myself, I always remember that field when I see any coyote, and when I can, I return the favor. I agree and understand that the coyote is only doing what he was designed to do. I live in farm country now, and some of the farmers prefer to not shoot their coyotes, believing they are more use in rodent and pig control. Personally, I think they are fooling themselves, but I leave them alone when a landowner asks me to. That said, I still shoot coyotes any time I can. Incidentally, I never, ever, shoot foxes because they are very good at rodent control and I have never had one take anything larger than a chicken. If you have that many coyotes around, you have way too many.

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from Delfino Alvarado wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I have never wanted to shoot a coyote until this weekend. I guess it was because of the drought this year and the increasing numbers with the limited supply of food, coyotes attacked and killed a newborn Beefmaster calf this weekend. I thoroughly checked on the calf in the morning and it as fine, by the afternoon, I saw the calf laying down and coyotes surrounding it and the mother trying her best to get them off. I went out there and the calf was still alive, but barely breathing. I waited a few minutes as I went to get my rifle and when I got back, they were eating it....I shot and hit one from at least 200 yards with my first shot and they scampered off. The buzzards were left with the feast.

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from braydenE wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

i personally would have stepped off the road a ways if i could do so without being spotted and just unleash on em! but its completely up to you! where im at in northern IL theres not many chances to shoot a 40+lb yote!

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from Mr Business wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Easier to ask for forgiveness then permission in some cases.

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from DEER30 wrote 1 year 37 weeks ago

In VA the coyote population is on the rise. I tried hunting for them on cold feb morning last year but no luck. I came close during the 2010 spring gobbler season as a yote came in to about 10 feet from me, the gobbler was at 40 yards and coming despite the presence of the dog. The yote spooked and I killed the bird a few minutes later.

My hunting buddy chewed me out for not killing the coyote instead.

I am not for their extermination but population control.

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I don't stop to think, I get out pop the trunk load my rifle and start shooting. After that I starting shooting pigs to help control there population.

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from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

In the are I live and work in, Northeast GA the yotes are out of control. Cattle farmers loose at least 3 or 4 calves a year from packs of yotes. Our family has about 100 chickens that we raise for meat and eggs. We usually loose around 20 chickens a year from yotes alone. They also reek havoc on the deer population, I have personally seen yotes kill 2 fawns in the spring while on the tractor. I will tell you nothing will make you madder than watching a yote kill a helpless fawn and you not be able to do anything about it. I say shoot them whenever you see them.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

In an environment in which coyotes pose no problem, I normally take a "live and let live" attitude toward them, since they have their niche in the ecosystem and their job to do. When they become a problem, it's entirely appropriate to trim the population back.
You comment on a situation in which you did not take what would have been an easy shot, and I compliment you on your hunting ethic and self-discipline. I infer you wanted to obey the law and did not want to risk a ricochet that would have hit your neighbor's cattle. If local laws permit (i.e., if coyotes are classed as "vermin" in your state or county), you'd do well to position yourself purposefully to comply with the law but provide a good position for a shot. I suspect after the first or second coyote bites the dust, subsequent shots will be noticeably more difficult because the coyotes will give you and your rifle obvious respect. They will regard your scent as an enemy as move much more cautiously. I believe the opportunities you now witness as easy shots will disappear as the coyotes' instinct for survival recognize you as a threat. On the other hand, they find it difficult to pass up an easy meal.
If you seriously intend to impact the coyotes, and it's legal to do so, you may want to trim back the wild pigs as well.
I had a small piece of property in SW Colorado in Archuleta County (near Pagosa Springs), and the coyotes did nothing to a rancher's beef cattle, but they caused havoc to the lambs on a sheep ranch that was almost an adjacent property. I'm not going to get into the "sheep vs. cattle" issue here, but the pickings were easy for the coyotes and that had to stop.
I consider coyotes the prince of varmints, and five of my rifles were purchased and accessorized with coyotes in mind, but my .22-250 has the best record to date. I'd wish you and your family were spared the loss of those chickens and turkeys, but when you get a bushel full of lemons, it's time to make lemonade. Maybe the "consolation prize" would be some superb varmint shooting! And I wish you every success on that.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Folks . . .

In TX coyotes are indeed considered vermin. It is legal to shoot them without any kind of license or permit. My neighbor--the gentleman who owns the cattle ranch--shoots them whenever he sees them. He has also poisoned them in the past, a practice I do not agree with and will never follow, for many reasons.

Several years ago I took a coyote on my neighbor's property. It was summer, hot, breezy, near midnight under a brilliant full moon. My daughter and I had been hiking in the hills for a mile or so, meandering here and there, exploring, very quietly conversing, when she whispered that she thought we were being followed by something.

There are mountain lions where we live.

As fast as I could without making any serious mistakes, I chambered a round in my .270, flipped the safety off, turned us both to face our rear, and put my daughter behind me and off slightly to one side with my Beretta 92 in her hands, safety off, ready for double-action fire. We slowly started walking backwards in the same direction we had been heading.

A moment later my daughter squinted and pointed with her chin. A young coyote, maybe only a year or two old, clearly visible in the moonlight, was tracking us about 175 yards out. I put the Beretta back in my holster with its safety in the ON position. I flipped the safety on the .270 to its ON position, too, but kept the handload in the chamber.

My daughter and I continued our little trek. The coyote would jog a few paces along our trail and then stop and stare, then jog a few paces more and stop and stare again. It would raise its nose up in the air and sniff for us and attempt to catch our scent, but the breeze was never steady and varied gently from all compass directions.

We--my daughter, myself and the coyote--kept this up for a good five minutes or more. My daughter and I were as fascinated by the coyote and its behavior as the coyote was by us and ours. I am fairly sure the coyote was trying to rationalize in its brain something that was completely foreign to all of its brief life experiences: two large biped creatures traveling slowly in the night, deep in its territory for no apparent reason.

I looked around. I didn't see any cattle or anything else of value within a reasonable field of fire toward the coyote or beyond it. I raised the rifle to my shoulder, flipped the safety off, looked through the Leupold scope, put the crosshairs just behind the coyote's shoulder, and pulled the trigger. The coyote went down instantly. It never even twitched.

A minute later my then 11-year old daughter approached the coyote as it lay in the grass. We knelt. She gently petted the coyote and stroked its fur. Then she broke down and cried and petted the coyote some more and pulled it to her and held it in her arms. She raised her head and looked accusingly at me, tears pouring down her cheeks. I felt awful. No explanation I made or offered held any water with her. And her counter-argument was brutally short and effective: "Dad, you had no call to kill this coyote that wasn't doing anything to anything."

I think my young daughter on that night was smarter and wiser than I was. On that night I think she was right.

TWD

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from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

One of these days those coyotes will tire of pork and go after something different. If they are so bold as to not only come onto your property but into your barn/garage its time to take a few out just to instill fear. I believe this is the same rational and argument sportsmen in Ca. are using to try and establish a season for cougar. The cat is becoming to bold and has lost its fear of humans.

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from steve182 wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Due to the boldness and abundance of this particular population, i can't understand why you are not shooting. Must you wait til your pets and/or family are threatened? As a deer hunter, I'll always shoot a coyote. Perhaps you are not a deer hunter. As far as leaving the cows alone, coyotes would only attack such large prey if it had an advantage,...say the prey were on its side giving birth. Coyotes routinely prey on calves and fawns in this way, and sometimes the mothers too. Also, why not be a good neighbor and dispatch a few for his sake? That .257 is great for dogs, almost a shame not to put it use. But to each his own. If your consciensce says dont shoot, don't shoot. I'll be shootin'

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Thank you T.W.D. for your very interesting post. It obviously took a litlle more effort than bantering around 'which is better a 30-06 or a .270'. OK, to shoot or not to shoot. I would shoot. Why? Honestly, because I just couldn't resist it.

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Like summit said I understand but I wouldn't be very happy if it were my chicks and turkeys they had killed. When I was 11 I had an understanding of stuff like this I realize its harder to do with you daughter in the car but I would take every opportunity to reduce the coyote population

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from teufelhunden wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

As a youngster (1980's) we had a rabbit problem. It was nothing to see 40 or 50 in just about every field you looked. I never saw a coyote in those days. Over perhaps the last 10-15 years the rabbits have disappeared replaced by large packs of coyotes. I usually try to kill at least 10 a year. I do not want to erase the coyote population (I know that is impossible), but I would like to have the rabbits, as well as quail and ringneck pheasant that used to call this area home, start to return. I know several people that have had their small dogs killed by the coyotes but never have any of my labs been harmed.

Coincidentally, In the days of rabbits, quail, and pheasant we also had a multitude of nutria. On fishing trips in the marsh, in the rice canals, or just about any other body of water they were very abundant. The Alligators were few and far between. I have not seen a nutria in this area in past 15 years. I have alligators running out my ears. When they lose their fear of humans things go south in a hurry. Most of my old swimming holes are useless. I can not run a topwater lure or buzzbait across any of the ponds or rivers or canals or lakes in my area without the gators attacking it. I took my young daughter perch jerking the other day and every time her bobber moved a small gator would bite the bobber.

That was off topic I know. I was looking for parallels to what happens when the population of any species go unchecked.

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from burnettjv wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

My grandpa inheirited 90 acres from his sister about 15 years ago in South-Central Oklahoma. That place used to be excellent for cottontails and even had a decent quail population. In fact, I went on my first hunt on that 90 acres with a .410 single shot. Last November I walked that 90 acres and there was not a rabbit or quail to be found. However there was coyote scat EVERYWHERE! and I heard several groups of coyotes howling and yelping in broad daylight. I say start shooting and drop as many as you can.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Steve182 . . .

The coyotes around my area of NE TX pose no threat to my pets and certainly no threat to my daughter or me. Several years ago I observed (from a range of about 20' while I was attempting to get my face out of the mud and grass where I had tripped and sprawled) a large coyote casually trot right by me with one of my chickens in its mouth. (There are no chickens on my property these days.)

I have personally seen my old Australian Cattle Dog (Blue Heeler) stand nose-to-nose with a coyote with the tails on both creatures wagging happily. My dogs appear to "know" the local coyotes and vice-versa. Everyone appears to get along just fine. One exception is that the coyotes stay out of the field where my jackass lives. Although Jackson the Jackass likes my dogs just fine, he doesn't like the local coyotes and will kick them or bite them if they are foolish enough to venture within his range.

All . . .

Early this morning, after a rare restless and mostly sleepless night, I was awoken from a very deep sleep by the unmistakable, piercingly loud bark/howl of a coyote that sounded like it was right outside in my front yard. It was that loud. I stumbled out of bed, threw on my bathrobe and my flipflops--I'm sure I made a very pretty sight, grabbed my .257, and stumbled out the door. I was so groggy that my vision was blurry and I could barely see.

The coyote barked/howled repeatedly. He sounded really close. I looked around but didn't see him. Confounded, I looked up into my neighbor's cattle fields and finally detected a microscopic dot 450 yards away. The dot moved. I picked up my rifle and looked through its temporary 4.5x scope at the dot. It was the coyote, looking back from where he had come from, barking madly at something that bothered him which I could not see. I chambered a round and rested my rifle on top of the steel horizontal fence beam and framed the coyote with the crosshairs of my scope. The wind blew strongly in my direction, but at a slight cross-wind angle, magnifying the coyote's incessant barking/howling. The coyote began trotting.

I calculated the shot. A richochet may have deviated off at a 30 degree angle and hit cows that were about 700 yards away. The wind made for a difficult lead adjustment, and the coyote was trotting at about 10 mph at an angle away from me, complicating the lead adjustment. Plus, although I had just personally zeroed the scope the day before, a 4.5x magnification scope on a long shot against a trotting coyote means you've got your crosshairs on a tiny moving dot. It would have been a 500-520 yard shot by the time I pulled the trigger. Although I knew the drop trajectory of my rifle to an intimate degree--about 32" at 500 yards with my handloads--and although I possibly could have made the shot, I couldn't bring myself to pull the trigger. It just wasn't worth it. Plus, a part of me admired the coyote for having the balls--or the stupidity--to be in broad daylight 500 yards away from me barking his head off for well over 90 seconds.

It's true: If the coyote had been at 200 or 300 yards with no ricochet or field of fire issues, I would have taken the shot. And I would have made it, a quick, humane, instant lights-out kill. But that wasn't the situation I was given this morning.

I have no regrets, nor have I ever had any regrets, about a shot I chose not to fire.

TWD

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from Bella wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Coyotes are not native to Massachusetts, yet we got em. I have only seen em twice but they are common enough that the state instituted a season on em. I ain't had no issues with em yet though. In season with the right conditions I certainly would shoot a 'yote and taw his fur too.
As 'Yotes aren't native to New england but wolves were (before we exterminated em all)I suspect that the 'yotes are filling in the "wolf" niche in the ecosystem.
Supposedly the last catamount in Mass was shot in 1899 and poor kittys tattered taxydermyied remains are in the Boston Museum of Science basement. Supposedly, that is because I have talked to 4 persons who have seen what they were convinced were mountain lions in the past few years. The State however is still in denial. One of my minor nightmares involves me having to shoot a painter off'n one of my sheep or goats.
As far as the 'yotes went the State was in denial about them too till they started showing up as road kill.
Aside from the sanctity of my goats and all I am happy to have coyotes, catamounts, bears and other preditors in the woods, they are hallmarks of a heathy ecosystem with all of its components in place. But I'll still shoot one if it is in my sights and legal. It is always best to not have regrets...

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from uwurst wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I got to say that I believe the coyotes eat way more deer fawns than they do the piglets. The hogs eat every turkey nest they encounter, but the 'yotes do to. A coyote or two probably doesnt do much harm, but no matter how hard you try or how many you kill there will always be a couple. So my advice: WHACKEM AND STACKEM! The hogs and dogs!

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from idduckhntr wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

like you i have no desire to shoot coyotes but just like whitetail they need to be managed i will only shoot them on my yearly camping trip and always cull at least 3 they are good to have around but if you get to many you might as well have a pack of wolves hope this helps

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I see, "and that" as the great radio announcer Paul Harvey would have said "is the rest of the story!"
I understand completely.

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

I almost forgot, "Good day". It's been alot of years

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Thank you for your comments, summit, and for understanding. By the way, I do completely understand the near irresistability of taking a shot at a coyote, having felt the urge on many occasions myself.

And thank you for your comments and insights, too, Mr. Palumbo. Much appreciated and always welcome.

Thanks to both of you.

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from summit229 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Just for the record, I UNDERSTAND T.W., but AGREE with Jim in Mo.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

All . . .

Have no worries . . . if I see a coyote in my garage or barn or on my property, and if I can safely and legally take it out without putting a hole in or through anything other than the coyote I'm aiming at, I assure you I will do so . . . but probably not when my daughter is around.

By the sounds of their howling at night, I estimate there are at least a dozen coyotes who live within 3/4 mile of my house. The three coyotes I saw the other day looked so healthy and vigorous I suspect they are purloining not just from my dogs' food bowls, but from many others in my rural neighborhood, too.

(It is probably not entirely a coincidence that there are very few, if any, domestic-size wild or semi-wild cats in the area. Haven't seen one in months. I think the coyotes have eliminated them. )

Mr. Teufelhunden, I gather that you are most likely in Florida. Is there any way that you and your fellow hunters and fisherman can legally (and significantly reduce) the alligator population in your area? For instance, if you and your fellow sportsmen got together with the game wardens in your area and sought permission from the State for a special culling hunt (or several), could such a hunt (or hunts) be achieved?

Thank you for your comments, all. Much appreciated.

TWD

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from teufelhunden wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Mr. Davidson,
I am actually in Texas. We have a season in early Sept. It lasts 2-weeks and the regulations for getting tags are quite cumbersome. Many counties including mine are also starting a spring season and loosening some of the restrictions. The problem is that the alligator is so closely removed from the endangered species list that many do not realize the problem.

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from peter wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

i love coyotes and coyote hunting. if the population is rising who should hunt some what to control it before it gets out of hannd because sibnce you live on private land there is nobody to hunt the coyotes and the population could get big quick

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from Happy Myles wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

"As the last human is dying, and staring up at the sky, staring down at him will be a cockroach and a coyote", said a weathered old sheep rancher".

I love coyotes. They are trying to make a living like the rest of us. So don't take it personal. They exist, but behave somewhat differently, on each of the three ranches we've owned in various parts of the West. In California, they would snatch a half born calf from the mothers body. In Idaho, they coveted sheep. In Montana, they ignored the calves, and stalked rodents through the snow, and along creek banks, at least, until the wolves moved in and killed the coyotes. The wolves were a lot harder on the livestock too.

The coyotes look for the easiest prey, and I feel are trained to predate differently by their parents in various parts of country.

Be that as it may I'll always love The Son's Of The Pioneers sining Blue Shadows On The Trail, with coyotes yodeling in the background.

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from Happy Myles wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Should have been singing, not sining, excuse me Roy Rogers.

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from DakotaMan wrote 5 years 1 week ago

You show commendable self discipline and I applaud you! In most areas I have lived, coyotes periodically became overpopulated and posed a problem to wildlife and domestic stock. In these situations we lost hundreds of chickens and therefore hunted them on site. But coyotes like all of God's creatures are important cogs in nature. We have to be sensible about conserving the balance of nature. If they are not over populated I let 'em run. It is good to hear their music in the evening and they are amazing to watch with their team hunting. I dread seeing the federal game wardens putting out their poison to eradicate them but realize that at times it becomes necessary. I have rarely seen them bother cattle/calves but they are hell on pigs, sheep, chickens and turkeys. I can remember once, when a house guest from Boston went bersek seeing a small pack of coyotes kill a fawn. They wanted me to shoot it because it was killing a deer. They didn't realize that coyotes do that for a living day in and day out. As a result, our deer population gets stronger over time. I love hunting them but I do give them a chance, even in the worst of times. I also remain careful about shooting in populated areas and use highly frangible bullets. My .223 Bushmaster and 25-06 are hard to beat when coyote control is necessary. Calling them in is a blast and really helps you control the situation in populated areas. I have been able to call them within 10 yards so buckshot will do the trick.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I hope your daughter didn't pick up a mess of fleas or lice from your coyote. Petting a dead coyote indeed!

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from hunterkid94 wrote 5 years 12 hours ago

i cant even get a pic of one on my motion cam!!!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

25-06 works great on both hogs and coyotes!

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from bigajvigs wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

To T.W. Davidson,

I have raised chickens on my families farm since I was 8 years old, and each year we loose a good number of them to coyotes. I have been woken up to many times to hear horrible screams from my chickens as they are dragged off to be eaten. They got so bold as to show up in the daytime looking for an easy meal. Being it as my family owns 23 acres of land I had no problem in trying to reduce their population, which has gotten out of hand in Connecticut (there have been over 6 attacks on pet dogs, 2 in my town, let alone all the dead cats I find half-eaten on my property). I have watched these dogs walk up to my chicken coop at night and work on finding a way in to get their meal, and by watching them I came to respect them for their cunning ways of solving problems. I had a pair sniff out a foothold trap I had set to try to catch them: The 2 yote's stopped, sniffed the ground, and gently nudged the ground where I had the trap under some leaves, in doing so the one coyote tripped the trap! They then urinated on my trap and by that point I knew I was about to loose some more chickens so it took 2 well placed head shots from my 22LR out of the window to stop that threat.

Coyotes do have some serious balls, I have seen them watching the UI men at work at night from a mere 10 yards away, just sitting there watching as the men worked. One even walked right up to my dad one morning when he was leaving for work, he thought it was a dog at first then when it got 10 feet away he realized it was a coyote and began to yell for me to come outside. I have a great respect for their cunning, but will not hesitate to drop one on my property if they show up.

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from jlfreeborn wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I'm central NC, and we're starting to get covered up with them. I shot one about 4 yrs ago that was getting ready to snack on my dead deer. Yall oughta see what a .308 does to a yote!!! That yote took a dirt nap!

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I've been called a story teller for what I'm about to print here, but this is the absolute truth. About five years ago I was driving on a main drag and saw a doe with her fawn in the corner of a green field. I'm always interested in the condition of all of the wildlife I see so I decided to take out my field glasses to see how the deer had done over the winter. While I was watching the two deer, a huge coyote, and I mean huge, trotted out into the field. I had my 22 mag. with me (as I always do)and this would be a easy shot of approximately 75-80 yards. I fully expected the coyote to chase and kill the fawn. The doe was very alert to the coyote but showed no sign of panic and the fawn continued to eat and to only occasionally look at the coyote. The coyote, for his part,simply looked at them once and then continued to wander in a sort of slow trot around the field and then come to a locked rigid stance. He then jumped straight up into the air with all four feet and tried to land on something. The doe and her fawn seemed to have no fear of this animal. The coyote continued to jump up and land exactly in the same manner and I finally realized that he was toying with a field mouse or mole. I watched this event unfold for about 18 minutes and then the coyote after having eaten the rodent slowly trotted off into the bushes.The doe continued to look in the direction that the coyote had gone but only briefly and occasionally. The deer were still feeding there when I left. I'm not trying to make any statements with this story only to supply information.

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from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

i say eat the hogs your self and kill every coyote you have the chance to . get your daughter a cat and see how long it last with them around . the coyote is the only animal i can kill with a big smile on my face and never feel bad about doing it .

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I'm of the opinion that you can't hurt the coyote population once they are well established. The hound guys in Maine hunt them hard and they still are everywhere. You can hear them howling virtually every night where I live. You can't walk over fresh wet soil on my property without seeing new tracks. The only coyotes that I've shot that have had deer hair in their stomach are the ones shot in winter. Those that I've shot in spring and summer are usually full of moles,mice, birds etc. The hound men think that I'm crazy and say that most of the coyote they take are full of deer, summer, winter,spring and fall! I'm being cynical here but I question their findings because it is so radically different from my own. I do know that my property always has healthy and plentiful fawn populations and at the same time plenty of coyote activity. I base what I say on the taking of around 20 coyote. The hound hunters will sometimes take three in the same day and they get together to hunt at every available opportunity. They have literally shot hundreds.

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from ggmack wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

it up to you. if you see them as a problem shoot them. from what you say though i would leave them alone. they seem to be controling the pig population. i see wild pigs as more of a poblem compared to coyotes that only eat chicks and baby turkeys.

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from 270WSM wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I WOULD SHOOT THE COYOTE THEN GET READY FOR A BBQ AFTER FINDING SOME OF THOSE PIGS YOU MENTIONED.

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from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Shoot the coyotes and the pigs. The coyotes are probably unfriendly to the rabit population and livestock. And the pigs can kill crops and livestock.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Moishe . . .

First, I have no labs. Second, my old Australian Cattle Dog passed away several months ago . . . of old age, not because of any threat by any coyote.

About killing . . . I've done quite a bit of it in my time. Like some others with a military background who read and write in these blogs, I've had extensive training in killing. For those reasons, among others, I prefer to avoid doing any more of it unless critically necessary.

I've never once regretted a shot I didn't take. And I plan on keeping it that way.

TWD
USMC,1984-92

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

TW, sooner or later as those Yotes get bigger,fatter and bolder, your labs and of Aussie pup will become a victim, then any livestock you own will too. Have you EVER shot a living breathing thing other than the coyote that got too close to you & your daughter? I think not.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

T.W.... Well done sir. thankyou

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Touching stories, but NATURE is a cruel teacher. Hunters know this.
I have always killed animals for a purpose, whether to eat it's flesh or wear their pelts. We humans are the top predators on the food chain, and that will never change. I am not saying we should kill with reckless abandon, but humans have altered nature so we must act responsibly in it's stewartship which means killing animals to help control their population; a bullet is much more merciful then Nature. Period. I don't have all the answers , but I do know thinking life as a Disney movie is not the answer either.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

there would of been led flying out of my gun barrel so fast it would of sounded like a machine gun going off but thats just me i hunt predators and coyotes disgust me cause they kill whatever they can and eat whatever they can in colorado they are everywhere in the mountains on the plains and in the cities the farmers and ranchers here welcome people who hunt predators with open arms cause they kill calves goats sheep chickens not to mention the pheasant populations

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from ms175503 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

i wouldn't have taken the shot. i'm too paranoid about a neighbor or cop seeing me and going to jail. besides we are the apex predators get out in the field and hunt, don't rely on dumb luck to beat the wiley coyote. take a sighting as accidental scouting and plan another time to come back and hunt.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

NE Texas,not far can help waging war!

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

This thread was started in Feb. of this year and a lot has happen with the coyote population here in my part of Maine. They are everywhere. I've shot 5 and should have had another today if I'd been paying attention. He saw me way before I saw him and all I got a look at was the ass end hightailing it out of my sight. What is the determining factor in coyote population? Someone mentioned that the population is directly related to the rodent crop and I suspect that this may be true. They certainly are an interesting animal to hunt and very alert to everything around them.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

We have a saying at camp, but i doubt it's appropriate to post here. It is as follows..."Shoot that @^%$%&^#*%$?!"

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

All . . .

A friend of mine in a rural county about 50 miles away from where I live in NE TX has a deer lease in woods and fields on a few hundred acres. A cattle ranch borders the lease. There are plenty of deer and pigs in the area.

My friend told me he went out to his lease to do a little maintenance and prep work for deer season. He came across a tiny calf, probably only a day old or so, that appeared to have been killed and half-eaten by coyotes. Later that day, my friend espied no less than 6 coyotes--he thought they were all from the same pack--in the vicinity of the dead calf. Unfortunately, at the time my friend saw all these coyotes, they were not in a good field of fire position for my friend to eliminate a few of them.

Later in the day my friend retrieved a wounded rabbit electronic call from his vehicle, set it up not far from his deer stand, and activated it. Within a few minutes he saw several coyotes, though none presented a good shot opportunity. Then he saw a coyote stick its head out of some shrubbery and brush on the far side of an open field. The brush and shrubbery was so thick that my friend could not see the coyote's body, but the coyote's head was clearly visible. My friend quickly took his Model 70 .243 loaded with 85-grain Barnes TSX handloads (going out the muzzle around 3200 fps), got a good rest, lined up his scope on the coyote's forehead, right between the coyote's eyes--a damn small target at long range--and squeezed the trigger. The coyote instantly vanished from sight, but my friend thought he heard the bullet strike home. My friend quickly paced off 308 yards across the field and found the coyote on the ground exactly where it has been standing. The bullet had hit about 2" to the right of where my friend intended, but otherwise made for a perfect head shot and instant kill. (My friend was somewhat awed by the TSX bullet; the bullet penetrated most of the length of the coyote before exiting and was not recovered.)

I intend to join my friend on his lease and help him get rid of some coyotes. It is apparent that there are too many of them in that area and they need to be thinned out before they kill any more calves. I am perfectly okay with eliminating some coyotes under conditions like this.

TWD, 28 September 2009

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I think I am going to buy a small game tag in CO if I get an elk early in the week and hit the BLM land nearby and whack some song dogs with my Bushmaster.

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from silvrtung wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

KILL 'EM ALL!!! i have lost my favorite bird dog to mange th=at he picked up from a tustle with the head honcho coyote near my house. my prize was a single shot bull barrel .223 and since last christmas i have been putting the fear of god into any wild dog i see.

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from thuroy wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Shoot the coyotes. With a population that high it isn't long before they start taking out livestock and your dogs.

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from kodnocker wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Do the deer and livestock population a favor. Take a few every year if you get the chance.

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from 60256 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I live in ND and on our property it's a idea of see 'em, shoot 'em. We hate coyotes and they really do no good at all for us except the cool howling noises in the evenings. We have gotten lazy and not hunted them the last couple years, and now there is too many. So this year when we hunted deer, if there was little to no movement, but we saw a coyote, we dropped it right there.

Nate

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from texasjohn wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Many years ago as a young man I helped clean up a field on a local ranch where a number of calves were killed at birth, along with several of the momma cows. They were killed, in many cases only a bite or two taken, by coyotes apparently teaching their young how to kill. Myself, I always remember that field when I see any coyote, and when I can, I return the favor. I agree and understand that the coyote is only doing what he was designed to do. I live in farm country now, and some of the farmers prefer to not shoot their coyotes, believing they are more use in rodent and pig control. Personally, I think they are fooling themselves, but I leave them alone when a landowner asks me to. That said, I still shoot coyotes any time I can. Incidentally, I never, ever, shoot foxes because they are very good at rodent control and I have never had one take anything larger than a chicken. If you have that many coyotes around, you have way too many.

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from Delfino Alvarado wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I have never wanted to shoot a coyote until this weekend. I guess it was because of the drought this year and the increasing numbers with the limited supply of food, coyotes attacked and killed a newborn Beefmaster calf this weekend. I thoroughly checked on the calf in the morning and it as fine, by the afternoon, I saw the calf laying down and coyotes surrounding it and the mother trying her best to get them off. I went out there and the calf was still alive, but barely breathing. I waited a few minutes as I went to get my rifle and when I got back, they were eating it....I shot and hit one from at least 200 yards with my first shot and they scampered off. The buzzards were left with the feast.

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from braydenE wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

i personally would have stepped off the road a ways if i could do so without being spotted and just unleash on em! but its completely up to you! where im at in northern IL theres not many chances to shoot a 40+lb yote!

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from Mr Business wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Easier to ask for forgiveness then permission in some cases.

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from DEER30 wrote 1 year 37 weeks ago

In VA the coyote population is on the rise. I tried hunting for them on cold feb morning last year but no luck. I came close during the 2010 spring gobbler season as a yote came in to about 10 feet from me, the gobbler was at 40 yards and coming despite the presence of the dog. The yote spooked and I killed the bird a few minutes later.

My hunting buddy chewed me out for not killing the coyote instead.

I am not for their extermination but population control.

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