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Survival

How to survive.

Uploaded on February 18, 2009

Don not wear any cotton. Its a no-brainer. I hunted with a buddy this past fall in pouring rain, less than 30 degree temps and 30+ mph winds. Our clothes were not waterproof, but we had on wool and synthetic materials only. We were very wet, but warm all day.

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from jamin wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Clothing is a good first step in survival. Along with wearing the correct clothes one should remember the 3 primary needs for long term survival; Shelter, fire and Water. Whenever we leave the home we should have with us the means of obtaining these 3 items. This could be as simple of having a knife, fire source and a plastic grocery bag. A person never knows when an emergency will present itself, The knife can be used to make a shelter, the firesource make a fire, the plastic bag can be used to collect dew, rain stream water etc.

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from 60256 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

You shouldn't even have to worry about camo or anything like because in reality, what will camoflauge do as your only clothing when you are lost and trying to be seen????

Nate

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Like my Science teacher says, "Cotton Kills".

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from sere9501 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I have to disagree with the cotton comments but I have to stipulate only wear a thin layer of cotton. I like a think t-shirt next to the skin, even over polypropylene or under armour but then I use a couple of layers (non-cotton) over that.

The reason I like the cotton is that is soaks up the moisture and dries out quickly when I want it to and then I can put a warm piece of clothing back on. I have also found it does not burn as easily as prolypropylene.

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from smallmouthaddict wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Years ago I went bowhunting in northern Mi.it started to rain and became miserably cold I started to shiver uncontrollably and started to get foggy headed, disoriented,what ever you want to call it,I almost had forgotten which way I came into my stand even though the way I came in was only 30 yds. away and down a small hill,thank god I made it back to my car got the heater going and warmed up enough where I could operate the car safely and find my way home.

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from Cheap Shot wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Sere9501 I've used that tactic when layering two socks inside "waterproof" boots so I could change out the cotton pair and get most of the water out of the boot, but I have to disagree with you on cotton drying quickly - even very thin cotton won't dry if the humidity is high enough. Take it from someone who's had experience trying to dry cotton for so long under adverse conditions that it soured and stank too bad to keep!

However, if I HAD to use some cotton, I'd use a 50/50 poly/cotton blend. I've had a few 50/50 t-shirts that really surprised me how comfortable yet how well they dried.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Cotton is a killer. How many times have I seen hunters gassing up in the wee snowy hours of the morning wearing hoodies and sweat pants. If their rig breaks down, those fools will find themselves in a deadly situation! I think it should be illegal to sell cotton hoodies in hunters orange! No kidding. And that snow machine garb is also a killer if you have to get off and walk in it. You'll sweat up and be freezing after a mile or two. Pack some wool duds on the sled in case you break down and have to hoof it out.

Strike building a fire out of that triangle of survival. In sub-zero or damp conditions you can waste more energy trying to keep a fire going than you'll get out of it. FOOD is the real essential. Wool, cotton, nylon, wet, dry, whatever ... the clothing won't make much difference if you don't have the fuel in your body to keep it running warm. Candy bars are a flash in the pan. Very over-rated as an energy source. Many of the granola bars are too salty and don't have any better lasting power than candy bars. Years ago I found Carnation Breakfast Bars to be the best lightweight food source to carry in my day pack. Taste a bit medicinal but they sure hang in there. And they are a lot cheaper than most of those specialty energy bars. In warmer climates watch out for the other temperature-related threat. Take plenty of water and something to restore the salts in your system.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I agree, never wear cotton in the winter. There are way too many high tech and relatively cheap fast wicking undergarments on the market today. Some poly/wool blend undergarments, layed with 100% polypropylene underwear then using outer wear that has wind stopper capabilities and you'll stay dryer and warmer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

In summer where heat is a problem cotton is good because evaporating moisture cools the body. In winter this cooling action will kill you. Never turn your clothing into a swamp cooler. In cold weather layer in a polypro base covered in wool. Wool will keep you warm wet or dry. Gloves! Take it from someone who's been there, it is ten times harder to get a fire made when you have lost the feeling and thus the dexterity in your hands.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from jamin wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Clothing is a good first step in survival. Along with wearing the correct clothes one should remember the 3 primary needs for long term survival; Shelter, fire and Water. Whenever we leave the home we should have with us the means of obtaining these 3 items. This could be as simple of having a knife, fire source and a plastic grocery bag. A person never knows when an emergency will present itself, The knife can be used to make a shelter, the firesource make a fire, the plastic bag can be used to collect dew, rain stream water etc.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Like my Science teacher says, "Cotton Kills".

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Cotton is a killer. How many times have I seen hunters gassing up in the wee snowy hours of the morning wearing hoodies and sweat pants. If their rig breaks down, those fools will find themselves in a deadly situation! I think it should be illegal to sell cotton hoodies in hunters orange! No kidding. And that snow machine garb is also a killer if you have to get off and walk in it. You'll sweat up and be freezing after a mile or two. Pack some wool duds on the sled in case you break down and have to hoof it out.

Strike building a fire out of that triangle of survival. In sub-zero or damp conditions you can waste more energy trying to keep a fire going than you'll get out of it. FOOD is the real essential. Wool, cotton, nylon, wet, dry, whatever ... the clothing won't make much difference if you don't have the fuel in your body to keep it running warm. Candy bars are a flash in the pan. Very over-rated as an energy source. Many of the granola bars are too salty and don't have any better lasting power than candy bars. Years ago I found Carnation Breakfast Bars to be the best lightweight food source to carry in my day pack. Taste a bit medicinal but they sure hang in there. And they are a lot cheaper than most of those specialty energy bars. In warmer climates watch out for the other temperature-related threat. Take plenty of water and something to restore the salts in your system.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I agree, never wear cotton in the winter. There are way too many high tech and relatively cheap fast wicking undergarments on the market today. Some poly/wool blend undergarments, layed with 100% polypropylene underwear then using outer wear that has wind stopper capabilities and you'll stay dryer and warmer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

In summer where heat is a problem cotton is good because evaporating moisture cools the body. In winter this cooling action will kill you. Never turn your clothing into a swamp cooler. In cold weather layer in a polypro base covered in wool. Wool will keep you warm wet or dry. Gloves! Take it from someone who's been there, it is ten times harder to get a fire made when you have lost the feeling and thus the dexterity in your hands.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 60256 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

You shouldn't even have to worry about camo or anything like because in reality, what will camoflauge do as your only clothing when you are lost and trying to be seen????

Nate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from smallmouthaddict wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Years ago I went bowhunting in northern Mi.it started to rain and became miserably cold I started to shiver uncontrollably and started to get foggy headed, disoriented,what ever you want to call it,I almost had forgotten which way I came into my stand even though the way I came in was only 30 yds. away and down a small hill,thank god I made it back to my car got the heater going and warmed up enough where I could operate the car safely and find my way home.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cheap Shot wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Sere9501 I've used that tactic when layering two socks inside "waterproof" boots so I could change out the cotton pair and get most of the water out of the boot, but I have to disagree with you on cotton drying quickly - even very thin cotton won't dry if the humidity is high enough. Take it from someone who's had experience trying to dry cotton for so long under adverse conditions that it soured and stank too bad to keep!

However, if I HAD to use some cotton, I'd use a 50/50 poly/cotton blend. I've had a few 50/50 t-shirts that really surprised me how comfortable yet how well they dried.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sere9501 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I have to disagree with the cotton comments but I have to stipulate only wear a thin layer of cotton. I like a think t-shirt next to the skin, even over polypropylene or under armour but then I use a couple of layers (non-cotton) over that.

The reason I like the cotton is that is soaks up the moisture and dries out quickly when I want it to and then I can put a warm piece of clothing back on. I have also found it does not burn as easily as prolypropylene.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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