Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Shotguns

  • August 22, 2013

    The Truth About Shotgun Ammo

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Our tests at a high-tech ballistic research laboratory may change the way you buy loads and guns...and even how you hunt.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 22, 2013

    Over-The-Top Tactical: Bulletproof Couch Sports Hidden 30-Gun Safe

    By Phil Bourjaily

    I thought last week’s post on the Loudener would be hard to beat in the over-the-top-tactical category. That was before my older son called my attention to a tactical couch called the Couch Bunker. It not only conceals a gun safe with a 30-gun capacity underneath its cushions, but those cushions are bulletproof and have straps so you can use them like shields. If you think bulletproof cushions are just what your next Super Bowl party needs, don’t bother inviting me. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 20, 2013

    Pre-Season Bird Hunting PSA: It's Time to Check Your Magazine Tube Plugs

    8

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Part of your preseason preparations should be to check the magazines of your pump or semiauto shotguns and be sure they are plugged—that is, if you plan to hunt migratory birds (or deer and turkeys in some states) with them. If you make your own plug out of a dowel or a pencil, test it with 2 ¾-inch, 3-inch and, if applicable, 3 ½-inch shells to be sure the tube holds no more and no less than two.

    I never take the plugs out of my guns for the very reason that I don’t have to worry about being caught without one. However, an inspection of my new-used Browning Gold showed the previous owner was running it plug-free.

    While putting in the new plug I bought, I was again reminded, dramatically, that magazine springs are about three times longer than magazine tubes and they are tightly compressed. Released, they come blasting out of the tube like those springy snakes in fake peanut cans. If you are not ready for them, they fly across the room at great speed, sending the retainer at the top of the tube to who-knows-where. In my case with the Gold, the spring flew into the depths of my hunting boot collection in the closet while the retainer wound up on a high shelf where it would have remained forever had I not happened glance up as I looked around the floor on my hands and knees. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 16, 2013

    12 Shooting Drills That Will Make You A Better Hunter

    1

    By Phil Bourjaily, T. Edward Nickens, David E. Petzal and Layne Simpson

    Shot a bull's-eye from the benchrest? Got 20 out of 25 at the trap range? Great—but they won't get you that 10-pointer when your heart is hammering your ribs, or drop those dives that come out of nowhere. Our dozen drills simulate real hunting situations, complete with sweat and adrenaline and the need to shoot right now. Use them to be ready for whatever walks, runs, or flies by you this fall and earn your "merit badge."


    Photo by Andrew Hetherington [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 16, 2013

    Gun Nut Challenge #10: The Sneaky Gobbler

    0

    By Phil Bourjaily


    Photo by Andrew Hetherington

    Some turkeys come in silently from an unexpected quarter, catching you set up to shoot in the wrong direction. That means you have to shift either a little or a lot, depending on the bird’s position.

    A slow and smooth draw results in a more accurate shot, but turkeys will notice any movement. You only get a few seconds to shoot before the bird runs away. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 16, 2013

    Gun Nut Challenge #8: The Goose That Slips to the Side

    0

    By Phil Bourjaily


    Photo by Andrew Hetherington

    The goose hunter who’s set up at the end of the line of blinds is the one who gets the go-ahead to shoot the bird that skirts the decoys. When such a situation arises, you need to open the blind doors, sit up, and keep your muzzle below the line of the target as you swing on the bird that’s passing to the side of the spread.  Right-handers have trouble shooting birds passing to the right, as explained in the Advanced Challenge, which shows why every goose setup should have a left-handed shooter (I am available). [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 14, 2013

    Historic Guns From the NRA's New National Sporting Arms Museum

    8

    By Ben Romans

    Across the country there are museums honoring or promoting the sporting life and conservation—the American Museum of Fly Fishing and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s headquarters, respectively, are two good examples. Likewise there are numerous firearms museums scattered about the U.S. But there hasn’t been a noteworthy attempt to pay homage specifically to the tool of some of our most honored outdoors traditions—the sporting firearm—until now. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 12, 2013

    The Perks of Buying Used Guns

    By Phil Bourjaily

    My Beretta 391 waterfowl gun just came back from the Beretta specialists at Cole Gunsmithing, where they fixed its balky action for about $80. Although the gun had never malfunctioned in the field with heavy loads — or even dove loads — I had to run it wet with oil to keep it functioning, and it wouldn’t cycle one-ounce target loads at all. The smiths at Cole polished the top of the locking block where it runs along the barrel extension and the bottom of the bolt slide. Now the action snaps shut at the speed of light and it cycles target loads beautifully. [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 6, 2013

    Practice for Duck Season: Mount Your Shotgun Indoors with a Flashlight in the Barrel

    5

    By Phil Bourjaily

    The most important facet of your shotgunning skills to polish is your gun mount.

    You can practice the mount at home — using a gun you know is unloaded — with or without an AA MiniMaglite in the muzzle for a 12 gauge; 20s take an AAA MiniMaglite. Turn the beam to its tightest setting so the light shows where the gun is pointed.

    First, draw the curtains so the neighbors don’t call the police. Start with a low gun, with the butt lightly under your arm and the muzzle below the target, which will be a spot on the opposite wall. I have a print of two jumping wood ducks in my office that works for me. Focus on the spot (for me it’s the beak of one wood duck or the other). [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 2, 2013

    Gun Fight Friday: Car Edition

    By Phil Bourjaily

    This week’s Gun Fight is between cars—armed cars. The matchup features James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 and the Hyundai Veloster Zombie Apocalypse Survival Vehicle that debuted at this year’s Comic Con (that’s Comic Convention). Both are heavily armed, although for different purposes. One is for espionage—movie-style espionage anyway—the other for hacking through hordes of the undead on your way to the mall or the beach. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 31, 2013

    International Trap: A Maddening Sport That Will Hook You Fast

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Among the wonders of the Prince George’s County Shooting Center is an actual international trap bunker. Bunker trap is what the rest of the world shoots while we are grinding up 100 straights at ATA trap.* It is really hard and really fun. After shooting pretty well on the sporting clays course I needed a lesson in humility so we shot a little bit of bunker. I got my lesson.
    International trap is a good news/bad news proposition. The good news is, in international trap, you get two shots at every target.

    The bad news is, you need two shots. More than two would be good, except the targets are so fast they are gone before you could fire a third shot anyway. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 29, 2013

    Good Place to Shoot: Prince George’s County Shooting Center in Maryland

    By Phil Bourjaily


    This one falls under the heading of “How I spent my summer vacation.”

    Surprisingly enough one of the nicest shooting facilities I have seen in a long time lies just a few minutes outside the 495 Beltway around Washington D.C. in Maryland, a state currently making more anti- than pro-gun news. More surprising—even mind-boggling—the Prince George’s County Shooting Center is a county-run facility, and part of the Prince George’s County parks system.

    I had no idea what to expect, but the place is a gem. It features a very nice 22-station sporting clays course, eight trap and 13 skeet fields, international trap and skeet (more on this next time) a pro shop in the clubhouse with guns for rent, instructors on staff, golf cart rental, pretty much everything you want in a clay target club. [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 26, 2013

    Best O/U Shotgun: Fabarm Elos Deluxe

    2

    By Phil Bourjaily

    $2,895; (fabarmusa.com) A rounded receiver and streamlined top lever give this new Italian smallbore over/under a distinctively modern look, while the well-executed acanthus scrollwork, game-scene engraving, and matte-finished walnut stock add a classic touch. 

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • July 26, 2013

    Gun Fight Friday: Colt 1911 vs. Mossberg 500

    By Phil Bourjaily

    This week we’ve got guns for gunfights again—but with a “Beauty and the Beast” theme. The beauty is a stainless Colt 1911. The beast is a black tactical Mossberg 500. [ Read Full Post ]