Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Hunting

Triple Play Decoys

Use a three-bird spread of realistic decoys and kiss your ground blind goodbye.

[Read More]

12 Shooting Drills That Will Make You A Better Hunter

Shot a bull's-eye from the benchrest? Got 20 out of 25 at the trap range? Great—but...
[Read More]
  • April 23, 2014

    Hunting Public Land: The Ethics of Lying

    By Phil Bourjaily

    I am a terrible and unwilling liar. That’s one reason I’m not a more successful public land hunter. If I run into anyone out in the field, I have a hard time not telling the truth about what I have seen and shot. Good public land hunters are a close-mouthed bunch, and not above fibs, sins of omission, misdirection, and the occasional outright lie.

    For instance, the other morning I was out scouting turkeys on the local WMA and saw a truck coming down the road toward me. I recognized it as belonging to a friend we’ll call Mr. T. He is one of the best hunters I know, and he has a lot of his success on a crowded public area. We’re really more like friendly acquaintances, although we hunt together a time or two every year. He and a friend had been out hunting since before daylight. We stopped in the road, rolled down the windows and compared notes. He told me where he had heard a few birds and seen one. I told him what I had seen, which was nothing but some other hunters. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 23, 2014

    Don’t Forget to Save the Turkey Legs

    1

    By David Draper

    I know many folks (including F&S deputy editor Colin Kearns) have already hung their tags on some turkey legs, but much of the country’s hunters are just hitting the peak of turkey season. This makes it the perfect time for my annual soapbox speech on saving the leg quarters from your turkey. I know so many hunters just pull the breasts from their birds and call it good, but that technique, which has sadly become culturally acceptable, leaves a lot of meat behind.

    Good meat at that. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 22, 2014

    Bighorn Curls Found in Alberta Could Break The World Record

    By Ben Romans

    The Edmonton Journal reports that Alberta Fish and Wildlife officers recently found a set of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep horns that may be the largest in the world. A preliminary measurement of 209 1/8 inches beats the current Boone & Crockett record by less than an inch.

    Wildlife officers had kept track the ram in the past because of its particularly large body and horn size and went looking for it after it seemingly disappeared from the foothills near the town of Hinton. They found the skull and horns and said the decade-old ram apparently died of natural causes in the spring of 2013. They took the set to Dean Bromberger, a measurer for Boone & Crockett, though the official measurement will take place June 10th, after a mandatory 60-day drying period. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 22, 2014

    Turkey Hunting: How Close is Too Close?

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Our youth turkey season opened a few weeks ago, and I heard three reports from friends who had taken kids into the field. Three kids had shots at birds. One missed, one killed, and one decapitated his bird. The shots were taken at 10, 12 and 7 yards respectively. That brings up the question: how close is too close?

    The closest shot I ever took at a turkey was five yards. I missed. After I missed the bird up close I found a piece of cardboard in my car and shot a pattern with it at five steps. It made a hole under two inches in diameter which, I can attest, is easy to miss with when a turkey is almost close enough to touch and your heart is hammering. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 21, 2014

    Is This the Best Shed Season Ever?

    7

    By Scott Bestul

    Last week, my hunting buddy Alan and I spotted the antler pictured above. It appears have come from 3-1/2 year old deer that I have trail-cam pictures of but never saw in person. This one side measures roughly 55 inches, putting the buck in the mid-120s last fall. Not a giant, but not bad either. More to point, it's one of many decent sheds we've found this spring and helps support a claim I've been hearing a lot lately—that 2014 has been one of the best shed hunting seasons in recent memory.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 21, 2014

    A Good Place to Say Good-Bye

    By David E. Petzal

    The other day at the range I was talking with a pair of fellow codgers, and one of them allowed as how he had been hit by lightning a few years ago. A thunderstorm came up suddenly and he was unaware that his right foot was in a puddle of water. He became aware when a bolt struck his right foot, went up his leg, destroying a number of veins, into his chest where it punched a hole in his heart, and out his left hand, which for some reason it spared.

    He reminded me of a barber I used to go to who was with the Second Division at the Chosin Reservoir in Korea; every day he had after that was a gift.

    “But,” he said, “my wife doesn’t want me to go hunting any more. She’s afraid I’ll have a heart attack and die in the woods.” [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 21, 2014

    Video: Moose Charges Snowmobilers

    2

    By Phil Bourjaily

    New Hampshire snowmobilers Bob and Janis Powell captured a run-in with a moose on video last Friday. The couple was riding a trail near Jackson, Maine when they encountered the moose. Moose frequently use the trails and ordinarily run away from snowmobiles. This moose turned and charged.

    Bob Powell jumped off his snowmobile and tried to keep it between himself and the moose but had to make a run for his wife’s machine. Janis fired a pistol shot into the air which seemed to dissuade the moose from further attacks. It wandered off the trail and into the woods, leaving the Powells shaken but unhurt. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 18, 2014

    The Correct Way to Introduce a Woman to the Ways of the Rifle

    By David E. Petzal


    Photo by Dusan Smetana

    A few years ago a friend and I gave a compressed instruction course to two women who were about to go on a mule deer hunt and had never fired a rifle before. We conducted the class separately, and after an hour or so my friend walked over to where I was and said, "I can't show her anything. She hits the 10-ring every time she pulls the trigger."

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 18, 2014

    Gunfight Friday: Winchester Model 12 vs Browning Citori

    By Phil Bourjaily

    In my extremely biased opinion, we haven’t featured enough shotgun gunfights. We have a good one today, as two classic smoothbores collide: the Winchester Model 12 and the Browning Citori.

    The Winchester Model 12, introduced in 1912 and made for over half a century, earned the nickname “The Perfect Repeater” for its slick action and lively handling. In 16 gauge, it is makes a wonderful, trim gun to carry in the field. The Browning Citori, initially intended as a low-cost Japanese replacement for the expensive, Belgian-made Superposed, has become a classic in its own right. Having visited the factory where Citoris are made, I can attest to the amount of skilled hand labor that goes into each one.
    Here are today’s guns: [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 18, 2014

    Do You Forage for Wild Foods?

    5

    By David Draper

    This time each year renewed interest in foraging pops up like a mushroom in the woods. In fact, the morel is probably responsible for all that chatter about finding your own food, as April generally marks the start of the season across much of the country. It’s also when a lot of hunters are in the woods hunting turkeys, so there’s a natural convergence of people and wild food happening anyway. According to this article in the Austin Chronicle, there’s also a renewed interest in urban foraging:
     
    “Until approximately 12,000 years ago, when the first agricultural systems were developed, across every border and cultural divide, foraging was the predominant means of sustenance... The lost art is gaining momentum for a variety of modern reasons, including economic hardship, increased interest in sustainability and ecological well-being, and a desire to reconnect with nature and food. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 18, 2014

    Bowhunters Help Reduce Car-Deer Collisions Outside Cincinnati

    3

    By Ben Romans

    The number of auto accidents stemming from deer collisions outside of Cincinnati is declining, and residents have bowhunters to thank.

    Indian Hill Rangers Police Chief Chuck Schlie told the Cincinnati Enquirer that drivers reported just eight collisions in 2013—down from 44 in 1997—and he credits a tightly monitored, archery-only deer hunting program for the decline. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 17, 2014

    Video: Florida Black Bear has Rough Landing

    3

    By Ben Romans

    Last Monday, a big black bear crashed to the ground with a thud from its perch 30 feet up in a tree after Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC) officers shot it with a tranquilizer and tried catching it with suspended tarps.

    A story from UPI says some residents in the Panama City, Florida neighborhood initially thought the animal was a dog roaming the streets until they saw it climb a tree, but were glad officials were relocating it to the Apalachicola National Forest—especially after its hard landing, which FWCC Officer Jerry Pitts said actually went just as planned. [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 17, 2014

    Hot Gear: 4 New Hunting and Fishing Items for Spring 2014

    1

    3-Tand TF Series Fly Reels

    If you’re looking for a reel that has the guts, rock-solid construction, and tanklike toughness of the most expensive fly reels, without the big price tag, you can’t beat 3-Tand’s new TF series. Available in weights 1 through 8, made from T-6 cold-forged aluminum, and featuring a sealed NanoCF carbon-fiber drag, these reels are exceptionally smooth and rugged. The bottom line is that you simply will not find this kind of performance anywhere else for under $250. Having put both the 7-weight and 2-weight models through their paces, I’m confident in saying either one could stop a bonefish or withstand being run over by an M1 Abrams. —Joe Cermele [ Read Full Post ]

  • April 16, 2014

    Wild Game Recipe: Try a Pickle Juice Brine

    4

    By David Draper

    Like a lot of game meats, wild turkey gets a bad rap for being difficult to cook. Much of this negative reputation comes from the tendency of hunters to overcook their meat, but I’ll admit cooking any wild bird does come with a challenge. Wild turkey meat has a tendency to dry out quickly when subjected to high heat due to the limited amount of fat these birds develop. As I’ve written about recently, marinades don’t add moisture to meat like most people think they do. However, there is a technique that all but guarantees a moister end product, whether you roast, grill or fry your turkey – brining. [ Read Full Post ]

Page 1 of 494123456789next ›last »