Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Big Game Hunting

  • March 19, 2014

    Video: The Ultimate Turkey Hunting Bike

    0

    By Will Brantley

    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read to “take a mountain bike turkey hunting.” It’s a great idea in theory that rarely pans out in real life, due largely to the limitations of the bike itself. 

    The tires on a typical bike are too skinny to maintain balance at slow speed, much less get traction on a sloppy springtime trail. There’s nowhere really good to carry your gun or bow, and riding while wearing a turkey vest is difficult. Most mountain bikes are painted in gaudy colors, too. That’s OK if you’re a spandex-wearing granola cruncher (or just riding for fun), but turkeys do not like bright, shiny things. Usually, you’re just as well off to walk. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 17, 2014

    Wild Game Recipe: 7 Secrets to the Best Corned Beef Hash Ever

    2

    By David Draper

    It’s hard to say which I like better: a big meal of corned beef, potatoes and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day, or that day-after cure of corned beef hash and eggs. Both are among my favorite meals of the year, but only the latter has the ability to put a high point on what is normally a rough morning. But there’s more to corned beef hash than mixing together meat and potatoes and frying it in a hot skillet. Here are seven of my hard-won secrets to creating the best corned beef hash you’ve ever tasted.

    You can also make a great St. Patrick’s Day (or anytime of year) meal by substituting venison roast or even goose breasts for beef brisket when making corned beef. You can find my recipe for corned goose here. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 12, 2014

    What Happens To Dead Eagles?

    9

    By David Draper

    I have to admit, I’ve never wondered what happens to dead eagles. I guess I’ve never seen a dead eagle so it’s just not something that crossed my mind, but when I came across this blog post from NebraskaLand magazine, I had to click on it. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 10, 2014

    What's the Strangest Thing You've Ever Eaten?

    By David Draper

    A few weeks ago I was up in Milwaukee, speaking about food at the 2014 Pheasant Fest. I ate plenty of good food while I was there, and had a couple beers of course, but by far and away the best meal I had was at Hinterland. I can’t recommend it enough. Along with Hank Shaw and several friends from Pheasants Forever, we were lucky enough to secure the chef’s table, and gave ourselves to the whims of Chef Dan Van Rite and the rest of his staff.

    After an initial appetizer of roasted Brussels sprouts, I don’t think we saw another vegetable for about eight, or maybe nine, courses. Instead, we got salami, beef heart tartare, oysters, elk loin and I don’t even remember what else. It was all amazing and by the end I was in physical pain from the food, drink, and laughter we enjoyed over several hours.

    One thing I did not get while I was there, but was featured on the menu, was the Pan Seared Duck Testes. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 10, 2014

    Video: Hunter Shoots Charging Boar at Point-Blank Range

    By Ben Romans

    If you’ve ever had an up-close-and-personal encounter with an angry wild boar, you know the business end of their tusks are no joke. Fortunately for a hunter in a recent video posted on LiveLeak, quick reflexes and good aim saved him from finding that lesson out firsthand.

    According to the poster’s description, the incident occurred in Sweden. As the hunter stands post, scanning the terrain for movement and seemingly ready to react at any moment, a wild pig charges from his blind side. The man barely has time to react, but hits his mark, and likely saved himself from serious injury.

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 7, 2014

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Opens More Refuges to Hunting and Fishing

    5

    By David Draper

    Earlier this week, America’s sportsmen and women got permission from Uncle Sam to hunt and fish on thousands of additional acres of public land. According to a recent press release from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 26 National Wildlife Refuges will either be opened up to hunting and fishing for the first time or have opportunities expanded. Currently, regulated hunting is allowed on more the 335 wildlife refuges, while anglers can fish on more than 271 different complexes within the National Wildlife Refuge system. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 7, 2014

    Is GQ Magazine's 'Learn to Kill in Seven Days or Less' Good for Hunting?

    By Kristyn Brady

    In the March 2014 issue of GQ, city-bred writer Rosencrans Baldwin tells the story of his first hunt, for Montana big game, under the tutelage of his foul-mouthed country-bred Uncle Cy. As a new hunter myself, Baldwin’s narrative "Learn to Kill in Seven Days or Less" is alternately relatable (“the thought of actually killing something this morning has my stomach in a boil”) and cringe-worthy (“I reach for my beer and accidentally point the loaded rifle at Cy's stomach.”) [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 28, 2014

    Bob Barker Likens Canada Bear Hunt to 'Legalized Slaughter'

    5

    By Ben Romans

    Famed host of "The Price is Right" and staunch animal rights activist Bob Barker recently came under criticism for his harsh criticism of Ontario, Canada’s pilot spring bear hunt.

    Barker was made aware of the proposed spring season by Zoocheck Canada, an animal group he works with, CBC News reports. Barker is most concerned about the orphaning of cubs in what he calls a “barbaric” practice — likening the plan to "legalized slaughter."
     
    “Everyone, anyone, man, woman, or child, would just be aghast at baby cubs being forced to starve to death. What a way to go,” he said. “What is the hunt about? You put out the bait, you wait until the mother shows up and you kill her. That's very sportsmanlike, isn't it?” [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 28, 2014

    Executive Order Bans Legal Ivory Sales

    5

    By David Draper

    The White House and the Department of the Interior recently put an Executive Order in place that essentially bans all sales of elephant ivory in the U.S., according to a press release from Knife Rights, a knife-owners advocacy group.

    The group says depending on how the order is interpreted, this could make all items with ivory handles or fittings — this could include all ivory-handle knives, ivory-adorned firearms, or any other legally owned ivory — “essentially worthless."

    “[M]any knowledgeable observers are concerned that language in the anticipated final rules could effectively prohibit many or most non-commercial transfers, such that you would not even be able to pass a piece of ivory, or any other object that was comprised in part of ivory, such as an ivory handled knife, to your heirs. Or, that simply sending your ivory handled knife to a scrimshaw artist to be scrimmed could land you in jail. [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 26, 2014

    Wild Game Recipe: How to Make Bearchetta

    2

    By David Draper

    By way of this serendipitous life I lead, I found myself with both a black bear loin and a couple pieces of wild pork belly in my freezer at the same time. As I was trying to come up with some type of idea for how to cook each of them separately I had a revelation – why not cook them together, in the style of porchetta, a classic Italian preparation for pork belly and pork loin. In coming up with a name for this bear and pig combo I wanted to go with boarchetta, but it didn’t quite work since both the bear and wild pig were of the female persuasion.

    There are two keys to pulling off this recipe. One, make sure the pork belly is dry before roasting to get a good, crisp skin. It also wouldn’t hurt to pound it a bit to tenderize it. The second is to monitor the internal temperature closely.

    Roasting times will vary greatly depending on how big the bear loin is, so keep a close eye on things to make sure the roast doesn’t get too dry. [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 25, 2014

    Oregon Elk Calling Champions Release iCallElk App

    0

    By Ben Romans

    Father and son elk-calling champions from McMinnville, Oregon recently created and released the iCallElk iPhone and iPad app for hunters that want to improve their elk calling.
     
    According to a story from the Statesman Journal, Bryan Langley, a 2012 and 2013 Pro Division world elk-calling champion, and his 15-year-old son Brayden, a former Peewee Division elk calling champion, have wanted to create an app to help other hunters for some time; they just needed to overcome a few technical hurdles.
     
    “Brayden has been interested in programming for a while, and so he’s been learning some programming languages and stuff,” Langley said. “So he had downloaded a free trial of software that you can do programming in, so we just kind of ran with that idea. We have a series of apps that we’re actually going to work on that are related to elk hunting.” [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 24, 2014

    Video: Moose Calf Attacks Researcher

    3

    By Ben Romans

    Working on a Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife study that tracks the movement of moose, Wes Livingston just finished tagging a calf and was setting it free when the animal decided to fight back.
     
    The moose remained relatively calm while Livingston released the blindfold and restraints. But when the last straps came off and the moose is able to run free, it instead turns on Livingston, knocks him backwards and then pummels him with its hooves. A small video camera attached to Livingston’s chest recorded the entire encounter. [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 24, 2014

    Shooting Long Range: The Generational Theory

    By David E. Petzal

    The other day while pondering whether major scandals would erupt on a hourly, daily, or weekly basis during the presidency of Hillary Clinton, I was smitten by a moment of blinding insight into the reasons behind the overwhelming interest in taking big game at long range. As it turns out, they’re only partly related to either shooting or hunting — they are, instead,  generational.

    Bringing down critters at long range is nothing new. Long shots have long held a fascination for us. Outdoor magazines once specialized in hunting tales where the nimrod nailed a Dall ram at 1,217 yards with an iron-sighted lever-action. But this was regarded as more of a stunt than anything else; something that you did maybe once or twice in a hunting lifetime and only in situations of high drama. The rest of the time, your shots averaged around 125 yards—or a lot closer—and so did everyone else’s. [ Read Full Post ]

  • February 19, 2014

    5 Tips for Better Braising

    3

    By David Draper

    Sometimes, when I mention the word “braising,” people look at me all quizzically—like I’m talking about some fancy, foreign cooking technique. Nothing could be further from the truth. Braising is the very simple act of cooking something—generally meat—at a low temperature under moist heat for a long period of time.

    Sounds a lot like cooking in a Crock-Pot, doesn’t it?

    In fact, anytime you’re using a slow-cooker, whether making a pot roast, stew, cacciatore, or any number of other low-and-slow recipes, you’re braising. You can also braise in a heavy-duty pot on the stovetop or in the oven. [ Read Full Post ]

bmxbiz-fs