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Hunting

Triple Play Decoys

Use a three-bird spread of realistic decoys and kiss your ground blind goodbye.

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12 Shooting Drills That Will Make You A Better Hunter

Shot a bull's-eye from the benchrest? Got 20 out of 25 at the trap range? Great—but...
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  • March 25, 2014

    Video: Off-Duty Policeman Frees Deer Stuck on Fence

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    By Ben Romans

    An Attleboro, Mass., family rescued a whitetail deer that wedged its hind legs between the slats of a backyard fence, pinning its chest and head to the ground.
     
    Grant Kelley, 7, said the encounter started Saturday when Dixie, the family dog, wouldn’t stop barking in the backyard. He went outside and immediately noticed something on the fence. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 24, 2014

    Does Your Camo Match?

    By Phil Bourjaily

    I don’t do redneck often, but my turkey gun is an exception. It’s an 870 Super Mag with a Mossy Oak Break-Up stock. The rest is well-worn Realtree APG camo. To top it off, the sling is Avery KW-1, a camo pattern meant for waterfowl hunting.

    Which brings up the question: Does your camo match? Since the parts of my gun don’t even match, I’m going to have to admit my camo doesn’t match very often. Some people, however, are obsessive about having everything in the latest pattern, and all of it the same. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 24, 2014

    Hunting Gear: Screwing Up

    By David E. Petzal

    One of the things I will go to my grave without knowing is, why is so much hunting equipment put on the market with obvious flaws? Is no one paying attention? Last week I attempted to mount a scope on a new rimfire rifle and found that when the scope was correctly positioned, the objective-lens bell collided with the rear sight. The rear sight folded down, but that didn’t help. The only way the scope would fit was if I punched the rear sight out of its slot, leaving a gaping hole, or used high rings, which are an affront to God, Man, and the Principles of Good Marksmanship.

    Did no one think: “If we put rear sight there, it get in way of scope. How about we cut slot one inch closer to muzzle?” That would have solved the problem, but it was apparently beyond whoever designed the rifle. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 24, 2014

    Hunting Tips from the Turkey Freaks

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    By Scott Bestul


    Jeff Budz scans past palmettos for a Florida gobbler. Below, Budz demonstrates the tactics of all our experts.
    Photos by Chris Crisman

    Lots of folks love turkey hunting. But these four guys are totally nuts about it, as in gone-for-three-months, drive-all-night, no-sleep, belly-crawl-through-a-swamp, forget-married-life crazy about spring gobblers. And you can learn a lot from them. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 21, 2014

    Write Best Caption, Win a Cabela's Trail Camera

    By Scott Bestul

    Happy spring, and what better way to celebrate the (supposed end) end of a long, nasty winter than scoring a new trail camera? Sure bucks are weeks away from growing antlers, but if you’re like me, your trail cam use has become a year-round passion, so you might as well add another to your arsenal.

    What’s that? You don’t own a camera? Well, you can fix that right now. All you have to do is write the winning caption for this photo, and you can have any one of the three camera in the Cabela’s Outfitter Series ™ line. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 21, 2014

    Wild Game Recipe: How Marinades Really Work

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    By David Draper

    For some reason, the go-to recipe for wild-game always starts with “Soak (insert game meat here) in Italian dressing for three days.” Seriously, how many times have you heard a hunter say this? This statement turned me off marinades for a long time and I have often mentioned on this blog I don’t use marinades. My stance on marinades has softened as I’ve come to value them for their ability to enhance the taste of wild game.

    One argument for using marinades is that they help tenderize tough meat. But this is probably the biggest misconception about using marinades, at least if you believe in science. According to a study done by Fine Cooking magazine, acidic marinades may, in fact, make meat tougher: [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 21, 2014

    How to Hunt Turkeys in the Backcountry

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    By Jace Bauserman

                          Photo: Bill Kinney

    Break out the backpack and camp out for a wilderness turkey this spring. The farther you go into the mountains or deep woods, the better your chances of not seeing other hunters—and of finding birds that have never been called. Here’s how to plan an overnight hunt, what to bring, and tactics for finding a gullible gobbler. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 21, 2014

    Gunfight Friday: Lee Enfield vs Remington Model 14

    By Phil Bourjaily

    This week’s matchup is a couple of older rifles, and age is about all they have in common. Rob’s Remington Model 14 slide action in .35 Remington is a deer woods classic. MReeder’s Lee Enfield is a classic, too, of another kind.

    The Lee Enfield was England’s service rifle from 1895 to 1957. MReeder’s No. 4 Mk. 1 is of World War II vintage and, as he notes, this particular Lee Enfield was actually made in the United States by Savage. Although we think of the Lee Enfield as a battle rifle, it was also used as a hunting rifle throughout the British Empire. There’s no way of knowing, but the Lee Enfield may have accounted for more animals, and certainly more different kinds of animals, than any other rifle. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    How to Teach a Kid to Turkey Hunt

    By Phil Bourjaily

    Photo: Wyatt Bradford Barrett, 8, Florida

    A couple of years ago, on a plane returning home from Texas, I sat next to a 7-year-old boy who had just added a Rio Grande to his Osceola, putting him halfway through his turkey Grand Slam. Whether a 7-year-old is mature enough to understand a Grand Slam—or even killing a turkey—is a question for another time. What’s undeniable is that many kids now get their introduction to hunting in the turkey woods.

    My generation started with .410s and squirrels, but we didn’t have any choice: There weren’t any turkeys. Now they’re everywhere, and most states hold youth seasons before the regular season. Many adults are more interested in turkey hunting than in small game anyway, and that’s how their kids learn the sport. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    Tactical Rifles

    By David E. Petzal

    When I was in the Army, I was once herded to a class on anti-tank weapons, during the course of which the instructor repeatedly used the phrase “neutralize the enemy.” Someone asked the sergeant what “neutralize” meant. The sergeant smiled a slow and beautiful smile and said: “You’ll blow the living s**t out of him.” 

    “Neutralize” was a euphemism, and so is “tactical.” A tactical rifle is a firearm designed for shooting people in a precise manner, as opposed to New York City Police Department doctrine, which is to empty the magazine as fast as you can in the general direction of everything standing and hope for the best. 

    If a gun company were to announce its new model so-and-so people-shooting rifle there would be hell to pay. So the easy way out is to simply call the gun a tactical rifle and everyone is happy. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 20, 2014

    Hooded Vandal Dumps Elk Urine Into Car Ventilation

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    By Ben Romans

    A surveillance camera outside John Lindgren’s home in Portland, Ore., recently filmed a hooded person pouring elk urine into his car’s ventilation system, OregonLive.com reports.

    The vandal emptied two containers of frothy liquid at the base of the windshield. Lindgren, a manager for United Grain Corp., a wheat exporting company, wrote in a crime report that he believes he is being targeted by members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union because of his involvement in an ongoing labor dispute with them. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Fat-Washing Whiskey is Apparently a Thing Now

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    By David Draper

    Forgive me if I’m late getting on to the fat-washing bandwagon, but it takes a little while for hip trends like skinny jeans, ironic mustaches, and greasy drinks to reach those of us who choose to live out here in the sticks. Maybe you’re like me and never heard the term “fat-washing” before today, so let me try to explain it to you. The process involves taking perfectly good liquor and mixing it with some type of fat. Rugged folks use things like pork fat and bacon, while more subtle tenders of the bar opt for the oils of olives, nuts, and seeds. The grease-slicked spirit is then placed in the freezer where the fat solidifies so it can be strained of skimmed off the top, leaving behind a spirit infused with another layer of flavor. For a more detailed explanation of the process, check out this recipe for venison-fat infused whiskey over at Foodbeast. [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Whitetails By the Numbers: A Snapshot of Our Sport

    By Scott Bestul

    As some of you know, I attended the inaugural QDMA Whitetail Summit early this month at Big Cedar Lodge outside Branson, Missouri. I listened to an all-star lineup of speakers, who presented a dizzying amount of information about deer. To be honest, I’m still digesting it all. 

    In the meantime, while going through my notes, I jotted down a bunch of facts and figures that jumped out at me. Compiled from different lectures spread across three days of meetings, some of these numbers are positive, some are just puzzling, and several are downright troubling. Together, they reveal an interesting snapshot of the state of whitetail hunting today. Here they are: 

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • March 19, 2014

    Video: The Ultimate Turkey Hunting Bike

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    By Will Brantley

    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read to “take a mountain bike turkey hunting.” It’s a great idea in theory that rarely pans out in real life, due largely to the limitations of the bike itself. 

    The tires on a typical bike are too skinny to maintain balance at slow speed, much less get traction on a sloppy springtime trail. There’s nowhere really good to carry your gun or bow, and riding while wearing a turkey vest is difficult. Most mountain bikes are painted in gaudy colors, too. That’s OK if you’re a spandex-wearing granola cruncher (or just riding for fun), but turkeys do not like bright, shiny things. Usually, you’re just as well off to walk. [ Read Full Post ]

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