Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

BuckTracker: Idol Chatter

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Whitetail 365
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

April 14, 2008

BuckTracker: Idol Chatter

By Scott Bestul

A couple of weeks ago, I was giving seminars at the Minnesota Deer & Turkey Expo. At the close of business Sunday, another speaker there (a video celebrity who shall remain nameless), asked me for a ride to the airport. I was happy to provide this favor. On the way, we got to talking about last fall’s season and our success and/or lack thereof. Then, out of the proverbial blue, my friend asked me an odd question. “Who are the ten best deer hunters you know?” he said, leaning forward and looking at me intently.

Well I admit the question caught me off guard, mainly since I do not normally rate the whitetailers I know. So, as I do often in such situations, I banked my answer hard off the glass and forced my friend to grab the rebound. “Good question,” I said. “I’ll need to think on that. How ‘bout you? Who’s in your top 10?”

And then an interesting thing happened. Without hesitation, my compadre started ticking off names…and every one on the list was a video/tv celebrity like himself! I found this curious. And it became even more odd when I finally did start thinking about the really, truly great deer hunters I knew…because NONE of the folks on my list had ever been on TV! Still, I wondered if my rider’s opinion was a reflection of hunting society in general. What are your thoughts? Are the guys/gals on camera the people you turn to for whitetail wisdom? And if so, who are the ones you look up to the most?

Comments (1)

Top Rated
All Comments
from David wrote 5 years 33 weeks ago

These hunting shows are a joke. They feed the herd, pick and choose which "trophy" to shoot and have the nerve to call themselves hunters. They're shooters - not hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redwillow wrote 5 years 51 weeks ago

i think the t.v. hunters are pretty much phony. i should have said killers, because the real hunters are the one's setting up the stands for these killers to come and pay to use. i've been reading bowhunter magazine since 1971, and some of these so called hunters on t.v. have been in that magazine since back in the 70's. greg miller never had a buck in a magazine that scored over 110 pts. before he became a so called expert on north american whitetail. the so called great phony, chuck adams never killed a single deer back then untill he was saved by the compound bow? nor did dwight schuh. take away all of these t.v. experts, compounds, and see where they would end up at overnight. as for myself i'm one of the hunters that is up at 4:30 in the morning, and walk two plus miles to my stands before daylight and have killed 50+ deer legaly, all with a recurve or a homemade indian style bow.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ODOC VIR wrote 5 years 51 weeks ago

With a hint like that in the subject title, how can someone not at least mention DICK Idol, himself. I did get to do some hunting with him about 25 years ago, just before he and some others, like David Morris I think, started North American Whitetail mag. He was a pretty above-average hunter, able to move into a new location, evaluate it and in a few days begin to guide his hunters to trophies. That, along with the coordination reguired to handle varied personalities and staff jealousies, earned him a life in quieter relms like Montana and Canada.As Bubba alluded to above, great does not always mean totally legal. One hard-working hunter named Ronnie from that flat farm country west of Houston built a reputation of bringing in good bucks every year, until they changed the trespass laws and closed in on him on one of the big ranches. It is said that he kept a log of bucks he had taken until it was over 700, then began to neglect keeping it current. He helped a lot of other hunters "finally" take a (first, etc) buck and that was his downfall. By then, he estimated he had taken over 1,000. It did take several years, as I recall. Was he a great hunter?? Consider that he was hunting vast acreages ON FOOT and doing a lot of rough camping. The ranches were probably "good' ranches but maybe no better than the TV guys get to hunt every time. I think he was a better hunter than a lot of guys who check in bucks that they have shot at long range from their vehicles, on private land or from the public roads.I think Larry Benoit probably earned the great tag and folks say, well he could not do that in my area because we do not have tracking snow, but I think that he would be one of those who learn about an area and what it takes and soon would be using a formula that would work for him.Yes, I agree with someone else above, I think Andre D'Acq and Steve Snow probably have similar drives, if not wallets, and are entertaining even if I do not yet know if they are 'great.' Mark and Terry are teaching us a lot about doing all necessary to grow, track, and harvest mature bucks but they are doing it on several highly managed properties. They are certainly giving it 100% and I respect them for all the thoughtful effort they are investing.I think a lot of talent and knowledge lies in the depths of organizations like the Quality Deer Management Assoc, including some world-class deer research biologists, like James Kroll and his brain-trust-partner who gets so little press - -Ben Koerth.Probably at the top of the class of deer biologists are 2 PhDs who really pursue and take real trophy bucks on the ground are Dr. Grant Woods (now from Missouri; among other lives - helped develop some of the BioLogic food plot plants) and Dr. Mickey Hellickson who, among many other ventures is the Chief Wildlife Biologist for the King Ranch in TX. He is the one who did the greatest scientific research on [many or all of] the elements affecting rattling whitetails. On the side, he manages about a million acres of (other) private lands in the southwest and IOWA. Both are outstanding HUNTERS in addition to their roles as leaders of deer education professionals.Mike Weaver, of Virginia, is now pushing 50 whitetails in the Pope & Young, most from VA, a state somewhat lacking in such quality animals. Is he great, or does he just have persistence and a few well-placed stands? He does hunt other states now, so do not flock to VA thinking you will find one, too.Here is a proviso that we must not forget - - solid addiction to the pursuit of whitetails and/or the opportunity to invest many hours, days, or years to actually be in the field chasing them is NOT something that converts to hunting greatness although it can be a great can of flavor to add to the total stew. Otherwise, a lot of US would qualify as great even if we were not well-known (yet).As one old friend always used to start his recipes - - take one large skillet, add 3 large cloves of garlic - work in the rest as you see fit. The first 3 elements in being a really SUCCESSFUL deer hunter are: Location, Location, Location - - whether one gets to the "great" level will be hard to define or achieve. BUT, we addicts are agonna keep trying.... Good Luck to all of you. Odoc

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dumb a@$ american wrote 6 years 1 day ago

Nate sounds jealous...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from I'm in school right now wrote 6 years 1 day ago

America has no brains. If they see something on TV, it is automatically amazing. The best deer hunters are the people that get up at 4:00 in the morning to put on their clothes, eat breakfast and get ready to be outside 30 minutes before dawn. Then they quietly walk the woods looking for that one trophy or the deer meat for their family. The people who make TV shows about going to other people's ranches and shooting their deer just so Versus channel has a sunday morning show need to learn a couple things about being a sportsman.Nate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris H. wrote 6 years 2 days ago

I think the vast majority of hunting shows are commercials for one product or another. I enjoy watching those guys and girls hunt and I enjoy seeing giant deer and 25 turkeys at a time. I do not believe they are the best hunters. They may have been great at one time but the are now hunting prime locations of enormous food plots and a strictly managed herd. I have very little doubt that I could take just as many big deer as Michael Waddell, Bill Jordan, or Lee and Tiffany if I had the resources to hunt where they hunt. That does not mean I don't think they are good people and I think they are all probably pretty down to earth. Are they the best hunters? I can't determine based on what I see on TV. Are they great sales people? Obviously. These TV shows are not on the air to show us great hunters. They are on the air to sell hunting products to people that think buying those products will mean they can kill 160" bucks. I use some of the products I see on TV. The products on the TV shows that would most increase my chances at deer are not legal where I hunt. (C'mere Deer, Buck Warning, etc.) I would love to have one of these TV stars come hunt my property and see what happens. Maybe I'd be surprised but I really don't think so.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John D wrote 6 years 2 days ago

I had an opportunity to hunt turkeys with Mark Drury and some of his team last year, and I can say without a doubt they are the best turkey hunters I've been around. Because they're out there doing it every day while we're sitting at our desks.Do not overlook the professionals like these guys that do it mostly all on their own land, on their own, day in, day out.Nothing replaces time in the field in building one's skill set. No one spends more time hunting and gaining intimate knowledge of how animals react under a wider range of conditions than guys like Mark & Terry Drury.A state-to-state jaunt of outfitter hunts can make you better at capitalizing on your opportunities, but most likely not a better hunter. Most of those guys think they're great hunters because they've become great in-the-field shooters and clutch men. Which is part of it too. It's not a static subject. But I digress.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I would love for one of these so called profesionals to come to my camp in Alabama and see what they could do. I imagine they would not impress me at all. And like another poster said, the best hunters I have ever seen have all been outlaws! I always wanted to bring them to my camp to see what they could kill, but I was always afraid I would never be able to get rid of them!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wes B wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I agree with many of the comments. I have watched countless hunting episodes and learned a lot, but most hunters can only hunt locale land to them. They do not get to manage the land they hunt because of hunters hunting land next to where they hunt.This makes it harder for the hunter to take that monster buck of a life time. After hunting next to my dad for many years and seeing some of the shots hes made and rout he has taken to take down that white tail he is pursuting. He has realy inspiered me. I could not put them in a top ten cause so many hunters help me in the field in many different ways.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian T wrote 6 years 3 days ago

Mike D. is correct. I worked with a guy for 20+ years who got every moose and deer he ever had tags for and did everything on opening day, year in and year out. How depressing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike D. wrote 6 years 3 days ago

The great ones I know are not on TV. They maintain consistency without hunting ranches or guided hunts. Everyday people who have everyday jobs who still find time to scout, plot, plan, hunt, and deliver year in and year out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I also live in the State of Maine and agree that the wide-open prairie is foreign to us back woods people. I do have a couple of nominations for the title of the best (backwoods) type hunters: The Benoit Family (good videos, books and seminars), Hal Blood (good videos, books and seminars) and Dick Bernier (good seminars and 2 spectacular books). I have hunted with some truly outstanding guys that knew the mountainous and swampy terrain because they worked in it and lived in it, the habits of the deer because they saw them every day and were excellent shots because they fired rifles every day. Getting a deer every 3 - 4 years was a very good streak of luck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 6 years 3 days ago

If you hunt far from the road and your state allows you to bring your animal out in pieces, then, check-out thefirstpackout.com website. The elk pack is great for this type of hunting. It will save your back from having to drag your deer out. I have used mine not only for elk but for several deer this past season. You don't even have to gut the deer. Take a look at the website and leave a comment about what you think about the packs

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Bramhall wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I love the hunting shows, but they really do not have any impact on the reality of how I hunt. I got my first buck at 16 years in deep in the Adirondacks of Northern New York. This was thanks to an uncle who was a woodlands manager for a private paper mill. One of his jobs was to provide venison for the owner of the paper mill to entertain his rich friends. I hunted for 28 years before having the opportunity to take a 4 1/2 year old buck. He's my wall hanger. Many other bucks and does have crossed my path in my 44 years as a hunter and some ended up as wonderful steaks and stews. Every one was special. Every one has a story. I learned something from each animal. The whitetail is a crafty adversary. For me the best deer hunters are the dedicated men and women who get up every morning before dawn and hike to their tree stands and sit there in the rain, snow, wind, cold or heat and love every minute of the hunt. They are hunters, and to hunters the pursuit is more important than the kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott K wrote 6 years 4 days ago

My opinion of what would qualify someone as "one of the best hunters" would include that individuals ability to locate and pattern big bucks and then, at the very least, have a successful encounter with him in the field.I don't want to say that many of the "TV personalities" aren't capable of doing that, but it would be refreshing to see an episode that chronicles that. It would certainly raise my level of respect for many...Andrae D'Acquisto and Steve Snow are two of the most capable whitetail hunters I know.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ken Pekarek Sr. wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I agree with most of the posted comments. While I think something can be learned from almost all of the TV shows, I realize that as mentioned above; my chances of hunting in any of the TV personality hunting sites is almost nil (no. I take that back it "Is" Nil). I would not call them great hunters as much as fortunate and entertaining, some more than others. I know several people from my area, the U.P. of Michigan that would qualify as great hunters. They are pretty consistant in bagging good looking trophy Whitetails. But bagging is not the only criteria for "great hunter" status. These people know their game and even though sometimes are not successful in bagging the buck, they can relate the circumstances to their hunt and you can learn something from them. They are always eager to encourage young people to hunt and are equally eager to share their knowledge with anyone who really wants to learn. They are great because of all of the above and are great teachers of the environment, the animal, and the sport of hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from josh from maine wrote 6 years 4 days ago

i agree with Dan D.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from eddie lunsford wrote 6 years 4 days ago

mike waddell is my favorite i learn alot from him. and he seems like an average kind of guy. ive been able to talk with him briefly at an expo in columbus ga. and he seemed very nice and the kind of hunter i would love to share camp with. hey mike if you read this lets go hunting in harris county.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I've watched my share of TV hunters and find many of them entertaining.Do I learn much from them.....No, not really.Most of them hunt in areas and on private ground that I'll never be able to afford to hunt on.I dare say, it's a bit easier to kill a "trophy buck" on these places than the places "joe average" hunts.I'm not knocking them, I just don't really think it's that big a deal to do what they do. They are fortunate to be able to hunt in the "best" places, but it doesn't make them the "best" hunters.Jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 days ago

My apologies Scott B.. For what ever reason, I had Bill H. on my mind!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 days ago

Uhmmmmmmm......... NO!The greatest deer hunters I have ever known, I don't think were ever on TV. Not for their hunting ability anyway!I consider great as someone who has the ability to go into a given area, select a spot, and begin taking deer, consistently.Three of the "greatest" deer hunters I can think of were all outlaws. Taking deer in great numbers, regardless of sex, antler size or bag limit! I'm sorry Bill H., you didn't ask for "sporting", you asked for "great"!The three took several great heads, just not always in season or without trespassing! BUT, (there's that but [butt!?] again!)they knew "where" and "when" to go! They could read whitetails like a book, something I really don't seem to "get" or "comprehend"!My dad was the sort who carried buck shot in his hunting pouch. More than once, he came back to camp with deer rather than squirrel or duck. "It was too windy for squirrel hunting, so I just sat down beside an ironwood (his name for a particular tree) by the creek and this guy came along about 30 minutes later."Not me, I could have sole access to a field of alfalfa and it would take at least three attempts to get my stand to the "correct" spot! By that time, the rut is over and I'm reduced to culling does or rag horn hermaphrodites, all the really nice bucks either noctural from hunting pressure or laid up from the rigors of the rut! THEN, gun season is over and they all show back up just out of bow range because, guess what?! My stand is in wrong spot! Again!!I would absolutely love to hunt the areas that are available to the likes of Bill Jordan, David Blanton, Mike Waddell, Harold Knight, David Hale and the like. I can't afford the hunts these guys are "given" FREE, just for the advertising!Oh, well. I am still happy with my "in"-abilities. The deer I take may not all be wall hangers, but by golly, I took them all through my own efforts! AND enjoyed every second of it.The one shot kills. The misses. The missed opportunities. The big guy that showed up out of range, even the big fat does that filled my freezer!You go BH, being on video/TV does not a "GREAT" deer hunter make!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dustin P wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I agree with Dan D. Some of those shows are entertaining but they just don't pertain to the areas I hunt either. Let's face it, you can count on those guys (TV guys) hunting in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Nebraska, Montana, Illinois, Wisconsin, or some Canadian Province. Hardly the hills of North Carolina where I live and hunt!At any rate, the best deer hunters I know and learn from are not TV salesmen, er, hunting celebrities.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dan D. wrote 6 years 4 days ago

Though entertaining to watch, the information on those shows are rather useless for where I hunt. Granted hunting spruce thickets and timber country in Northern Maine doesn't make for great TV. Basically, I've come to realize nothing really works with any consistancy. The way I and most guys I know hunt in the thick stuff, short of snow and tracking, is to pattern the deer the best you can and set up an a trail. This would really make for boring TV.To me the most impressive hunters I know are the ones that track a buck for miles, jump shoot him, gut him, and drag the 200+ lbs back over some of the thickest narliest county I've seen. And they do it every year!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from David wrote 5 years 33 weeks ago

These hunting shows are a joke. They feed the herd, pick and choose which "trophy" to shoot and have the nerve to call themselves hunters. They're shooters - not hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redwillow wrote 5 years 51 weeks ago

i think the t.v. hunters are pretty much phony. i should have said killers, because the real hunters are the one's setting up the stands for these killers to come and pay to use. i've been reading bowhunter magazine since 1971, and some of these so called hunters on t.v. have been in that magazine since back in the 70's. greg miller never had a buck in a magazine that scored over 110 pts. before he became a so called expert on north american whitetail. the so called great phony, chuck adams never killed a single deer back then untill he was saved by the compound bow? nor did dwight schuh. take away all of these t.v. experts, compounds, and see where they would end up at overnight. as for myself i'm one of the hunters that is up at 4:30 in the morning, and walk two plus miles to my stands before daylight and have killed 50+ deer legaly, all with a recurve or a homemade indian style bow.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ODOC VIR wrote 5 years 51 weeks ago

With a hint like that in the subject title, how can someone not at least mention DICK Idol, himself. I did get to do some hunting with him about 25 years ago, just before he and some others, like David Morris I think, started North American Whitetail mag. He was a pretty above-average hunter, able to move into a new location, evaluate it and in a few days begin to guide his hunters to trophies. That, along with the coordination reguired to handle varied personalities and staff jealousies, earned him a life in quieter relms like Montana and Canada.As Bubba alluded to above, great does not always mean totally legal. One hard-working hunter named Ronnie from that flat farm country west of Houston built a reputation of bringing in good bucks every year, until they changed the trespass laws and closed in on him on one of the big ranches. It is said that he kept a log of bucks he had taken until it was over 700, then began to neglect keeping it current. He helped a lot of other hunters "finally" take a (first, etc) buck and that was his downfall. By then, he estimated he had taken over 1,000. It did take several years, as I recall. Was he a great hunter?? Consider that he was hunting vast acreages ON FOOT and doing a lot of rough camping. The ranches were probably "good' ranches but maybe no better than the TV guys get to hunt every time. I think he was a better hunter than a lot of guys who check in bucks that they have shot at long range from their vehicles, on private land or from the public roads.I think Larry Benoit probably earned the great tag and folks say, well he could not do that in my area because we do not have tracking snow, but I think that he would be one of those who learn about an area and what it takes and soon would be using a formula that would work for him.Yes, I agree with someone else above, I think Andre D'Acq and Steve Snow probably have similar drives, if not wallets, and are entertaining even if I do not yet know if they are 'great.' Mark and Terry are teaching us a lot about doing all necessary to grow, track, and harvest mature bucks but they are doing it on several highly managed properties. They are certainly giving it 100% and I respect them for all the thoughtful effort they are investing.I think a lot of talent and knowledge lies in the depths of organizations like the Quality Deer Management Assoc, including some world-class deer research biologists, like James Kroll and his brain-trust-partner who gets so little press - -Ben Koerth.Probably at the top of the class of deer biologists are 2 PhDs who really pursue and take real trophy bucks on the ground are Dr. Grant Woods (now from Missouri; among other lives - helped develop some of the BioLogic food plot plants) and Dr. Mickey Hellickson who, among many other ventures is the Chief Wildlife Biologist for the King Ranch in TX. He is the one who did the greatest scientific research on [many or all of] the elements affecting rattling whitetails. On the side, he manages about a million acres of (other) private lands in the southwest and IOWA. Both are outstanding HUNTERS in addition to their roles as leaders of deer education professionals.Mike Weaver, of Virginia, is now pushing 50 whitetails in the Pope & Young, most from VA, a state somewhat lacking in such quality animals. Is he great, or does he just have persistence and a few well-placed stands? He does hunt other states now, so do not flock to VA thinking you will find one, too.Here is a proviso that we must not forget - - solid addiction to the pursuit of whitetails and/or the opportunity to invest many hours, days, or years to actually be in the field chasing them is NOT something that converts to hunting greatness although it can be a great can of flavor to add to the total stew. Otherwise, a lot of US would qualify as great even if we were not well-known (yet).As one old friend always used to start his recipes - - take one large skillet, add 3 large cloves of garlic - work in the rest as you see fit. The first 3 elements in being a really SUCCESSFUL deer hunter are: Location, Location, Location - - whether one gets to the "great" level will be hard to define or achieve. BUT, we addicts are agonna keep trying.... Good Luck to all of you. Odoc

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dumb a@$ american wrote 6 years 1 day ago

Nate sounds jealous...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from I'm in school right now wrote 6 years 1 day ago

America has no brains. If they see something on TV, it is automatically amazing. The best deer hunters are the people that get up at 4:00 in the morning to put on their clothes, eat breakfast and get ready to be outside 30 minutes before dawn. Then they quietly walk the woods looking for that one trophy or the deer meat for their family. The people who make TV shows about going to other people's ranches and shooting their deer just so Versus channel has a sunday morning show need to learn a couple things about being a sportsman.Nate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris H. wrote 6 years 2 days ago

I think the vast majority of hunting shows are commercials for one product or another. I enjoy watching those guys and girls hunt and I enjoy seeing giant deer and 25 turkeys at a time. I do not believe they are the best hunters. They may have been great at one time but the are now hunting prime locations of enormous food plots and a strictly managed herd. I have very little doubt that I could take just as many big deer as Michael Waddell, Bill Jordan, or Lee and Tiffany if I had the resources to hunt where they hunt. That does not mean I don't think they are good people and I think they are all probably pretty down to earth. Are they the best hunters? I can't determine based on what I see on TV. Are they great sales people? Obviously. These TV shows are not on the air to show us great hunters. They are on the air to sell hunting products to people that think buying those products will mean they can kill 160" bucks. I use some of the products I see on TV. The products on the TV shows that would most increase my chances at deer are not legal where I hunt. (C'mere Deer, Buck Warning, etc.) I would love to have one of these TV stars come hunt my property and see what happens. Maybe I'd be surprised but I really don't think so.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John D wrote 6 years 2 days ago

I had an opportunity to hunt turkeys with Mark Drury and some of his team last year, and I can say without a doubt they are the best turkey hunters I've been around. Because they're out there doing it every day while we're sitting at our desks.Do not overlook the professionals like these guys that do it mostly all on their own land, on their own, day in, day out.Nothing replaces time in the field in building one's skill set. No one spends more time hunting and gaining intimate knowledge of how animals react under a wider range of conditions than guys like Mark & Terry Drury.A state-to-state jaunt of outfitter hunts can make you better at capitalizing on your opportunities, but most likely not a better hunter. Most of those guys think they're great hunters because they've become great in-the-field shooters and clutch men. Which is part of it too. It's not a static subject. But I digress.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I would love for one of these so called profesionals to come to my camp in Alabama and see what they could do. I imagine they would not impress me at all. And like another poster said, the best hunters I have ever seen have all been outlaws! I always wanted to bring them to my camp to see what they could kill, but I was always afraid I would never be able to get rid of them!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wes B wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I agree with many of the comments. I have watched countless hunting episodes and learned a lot, but most hunters can only hunt locale land to them. They do not get to manage the land they hunt because of hunters hunting land next to where they hunt.This makes it harder for the hunter to take that monster buck of a life time. After hunting next to my dad for many years and seeing some of the shots hes made and rout he has taken to take down that white tail he is pursuting. He has realy inspiered me. I could not put them in a top ten cause so many hunters help me in the field in many different ways.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian T wrote 6 years 3 days ago

Mike D. is correct. I worked with a guy for 20+ years who got every moose and deer he ever had tags for and did everything on opening day, year in and year out. How depressing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike D. wrote 6 years 3 days ago

The great ones I know are not on TV. They maintain consistency without hunting ranches or guided hunts. Everyday people who have everyday jobs who still find time to scout, plot, plan, hunt, and deliver year in and year out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I also live in the State of Maine and agree that the wide-open prairie is foreign to us back woods people. I do have a couple of nominations for the title of the best (backwoods) type hunters: The Benoit Family (good videos, books and seminars), Hal Blood (good videos, books and seminars) and Dick Bernier (good seminars and 2 spectacular books). I have hunted with some truly outstanding guys that knew the mountainous and swampy terrain because they worked in it and lived in it, the habits of the deer because they saw them every day and were excellent shots because they fired rifles every day. Getting a deer every 3 - 4 years was a very good streak of luck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 6 years 3 days ago

If you hunt far from the road and your state allows you to bring your animal out in pieces, then, check-out thefirstpackout.com website. The elk pack is great for this type of hunting. It will save your back from having to drag your deer out. I have used mine not only for elk but for several deer this past season. You don't even have to gut the deer. Take a look at the website and leave a comment about what you think about the packs

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Bramhall wrote 6 years 3 days ago

I love the hunting shows, but they really do not have any impact on the reality of how I hunt. I got my first buck at 16 years in deep in the Adirondacks of Northern New York. This was thanks to an uncle who was a woodlands manager for a private paper mill. One of his jobs was to provide venison for the owner of the paper mill to entertain his rich friends. I hunted for 28 years before having the opportunity to take a 4 1/2 year old buck. He's my wall hanger. Many other bucks and does have crossed my path in my 44 years as a hunter and some ended up as wonderful steaks and stews. Every one was special. Every one has a story. I learned something from each animal. The whitetail is a crafty adversary. For me the best deer hunters are the dedicated men and women who get up every morning before dawn and hike to their tree stands and sit there in the rain, snow, wind, cold or heat and love every minute of the hunt. They are hunters, and to hunters the pursuit is more important than the kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott K wrote 6 years 4 days ago

My opinion of what would qualify someone as "one of the best hunters" would include that individuals ability to locate and pattern big bucks and then, at the very least, have a successful encounter with him in the field.I don't want to say that many of the "TV personalities" aren't capable of doing that, but it would be refreshing to see an episode that chronicles that. It would certainly raise my level of respect for many...Andrae D'Acquisto and Steve Snow are two of the most capable whitetail hunters I know.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ken Pekarek Sr. wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I agree with most of the posted comments. While I think something can be learned from almost all of the TV shows, I realize that as mentioned above; my chances of hunting in any of the TV personality hunting sites is almost nil (no. I take that back it "Is" Nil). I would not call them great hunters as much as fortunate and entertaining, some more than others. I know several people from my area, the U.P. of Michigan that would qualify as great hunters. They are pretty consistant in bagging good looking trophy Whitetails. But bagging is not the only criteria for "great hunter" status. These people know their game and even though sometimes are not successful in bagging the buck, they can relate the circumstances to their hunt and you can learn something from them. They are always eager to encourage young people to hunt and are equally eager to share their knowledge with anyone who really wants to learn. They are great because of all of the above and are great teachers of the environment, the animal, and the sport of hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from josh from maine wrote 6 years 4 days ago

i agree with Dan D.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from eddie lunsford wrote 6 years 4 days ago

mike waddell is my favorite i learn alot from him. and he seems like an average kind of guy. ive been able to talk with him briefly at an expo in columbus ga. and he seemed very nice and the kind of hunter i would love to share camp with. hey mike if you read this lets go hunting in harris county.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I've watched my share of TV hunters and find many of them entertaining.Do I learn much from them.....No, not really.Most of them hunt in areas and on private ground that I'll never be able to afford to hunt on.I dare say, it's a bit easier to kill a "trophy buck" on these places than the places "joe average" hunts.I'm not knocking them, I just don't really think it's that big a deal to do what they do. They are fortunate to be able to hunt in the "best" places, but it doesn't make them the "best" hunters.Jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 days ago

My apologies Scott B.. For what ever reason, I had Bill H. on my mind!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 days ago

Uhmmmmmmm......... NO!The greatest deer hunters I have ever known, I don't think were ever on TV. Not for their hunting ability anyway!I consider great as someone who has the ability to go into a given area, select a spot, and begin taking deer, consistently.Three of the "greatest" deer hunters I can think of were all outlaws. Taking deer in great numbers, regardless of sex, antler size or bag limit! I'm sorry Bill H., you didn't ask for "sporting", you asked for "great"!The three took several great heads, just not always in season or without trespassing! BUT, (there's that but [butt!?] again!)they knew "where" and "when" to go! They could read whitetails like a book, something I really don't seem to "get" or "comprehend"!My dad was the sort who carried buck shot in his hunting pouch. More than once, he came back to camp with deer rather than squirrel or duck. "It was too windy for squirrel hunting, so I just sat down beside an ironwood (his name for a particular tree) by the creek and this guy came along about 30 minutes later."Not me, I could have sole access to a field of alfalfa and it would take at least three attempts to get my stand to the "correct" spot! By that time, the rut is over and I'm reduced to culling does or rag horn hermaphrodites, all the really nice bucks either noctural from hunting pressure or laid up from the rigors of the rut! THEN, gun season is over and they all show back up just out of bow range because, guess what?! My stand is in wrong spot! Again!!I would absolutely love to hunt the areas that are available to the likes of Bill Jordan, David Blanton, Mike Waddell, Harold Knight, David Hale and the like. I can't afford the hunts these guys are "given" FREE, just for the advertising!Oh, well. I am still happy with my "in"-abilities. The deer I take may not all be wall hangers, but by golly, I took them all through my own efforts! AND enjoyed every second of it.The one shot kills. The misses. The missed opportunities. The big guy that showed up out of range, even the big fat does that filled my freezer!You go BH, being on video/TV does not a "GREAT" deer hunter make!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dustin P wrote 6 years 4 days ago

I agree with Dan D. Some of those shows are entertaining but they just don't pertain to the areas I hunt either. Let's face it, you can count on those guys (TV guys) hunting in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Nebraska, Montana, Illinois, Wisconsin, or some Canadian Province. Hardly the hills of North Carolina where I live and hunt!At any rate, the best deer hunters I know and learn from are not TV salesmen, er, hunting celebrities.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dan D. wrote 6 years 4 days ago

Though entertaining to watch, the information on those shows are rather useless for where I hunt. Granted hunting spruce thickets and timber country in Northern Maine doesn't make for great TV. Basically, I've come to realize nothing really works with any consistancy. The way I and most guys I know hunt in the thick stuff, short of snow and tracking, is to pattern the deer the best you can and set up an a trail. This would really make for boring TV.To me the most impressive hunters I know are the ones that track a buck for miles, jump shoot him, gut him, and drag the 200+ lbs back over some of the thickest narliest county I've seen. And they do it every year!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs