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BuckTracker: Shed-Regs

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April 08, 2008

BuckTracker: Shed-Regs

By Scott Bestul

Out of the office last week on an early archery turkey hunt (which I’ll discuss in another post). When I returned, I was curious to read a story forwarded to me by none other than fellow shed-nut Bill Heavey. In short, the article covers an interesting, and growing, phenomenon in the West; the regulation of shed-hunting. Click here to read the full story from the Wyoming Tribune.

Now before some of you get upset—previous shed-hunting posts indicate a percentage of hunters don’t think it’s trespassing if all you’re doing is grabbing horns—this is a topic worth examining. Especially if you’ve had a winter like the one we’re (hopefully) now digging out of. In the northern tier of states, most deer species congregate in yarding areas that offer some relief from snow depth, wind and/or temperature. They may linger in these areas for months, riding out deep snow and severe cold until spring finally arrives and allows them to travel.

Many of these wintering areas are not only traditional for deer and elk, but well-known among wildlife enthusiasts. And shed hunters, whom we now are told can make money ($4-$8/pound) selling antlers, have been known to enter these yarding areas early, in hopes of beating other hunters to the horns. In the process, they may harass wildlife doing all it can to survive. Some states have even adopted no-trespassing rules until a specified date—typically well after snow-melt—elapses.   

So what are your thoughts? While tighter shed-regs seem an obvious benefit to western wildlife, are they just another in a long line of restrictions that take the fun out of outdoor sports? Or has the ability to make profit from horns robbed people of the common sense to leave animals alone when they’re vulnerable? And with an increase in shed-poaching in the East and Midwest, maybe an official “shed season” with accompanying opening dates and stricter trespass laws, would make things more fair for everyone. Let me know your thoughts!

Comments (1)

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from DJM wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Thanks for the help guys.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott Bestul wrote 6 years 1 week ago

DJM: Critters will chew up sheds long before they'll rot away. I've found some that have been laying for a year or more. You'll still find antlers at the end of May, you just might have to look harder if the vegetation is greening up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

DJM,Animals such as mice and porcupines will chew on the antlers and widdle some of it down. But I don't believe they break down.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DJM wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Quick question: I'm new to shed hunting, was wondering if sheds ever go bad? i.e., is it possible for me to go out at the end of may looking for them? Or will the antlers be destroyed by them? I ask b/c im in school and dont have alot of time.Thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from I'm in school right now wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I know shed hunting is fun, but when you get to the point that wildlife is getting disrupted, you should probably stop. If you are going to bring out a dog shed hunting, then keep control of it. When we go into the woods, we are the guests, not the animals. Why do they have to be harassed by people who do not know what the heck they are doing. It is just the couple of retards that ruin it for everyone.Nate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rob wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Although I'm generally averse to more regulation, yes, I think the fact that it's now possible to make a profit from sheds will render a lot of people too stupid to leave animals alone when they're vulnerable. As with so many other issues related to the enjoyment of our sport, a few idiots will do their best to ruin things for the rest of us.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jake wrote 6 years 1 week ago

To me this issue is less about shed hunting and more about tresspassing. Why would it ever be ok to cross onto someone else's property without permission? Hunters (Meat or Antler) who do not obey boundries are disrespectfull and dangerous.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

One method I use to keep trouble off my property is telling all the locals that I got motion cameras all over my land and will get you're picture if you trespass.The older locals tell all the new comers this and they aviod my land. My neighbors are the only ones who I let on and they're in their 70s so I don't worry about them. I do have two motion cameras up and never got a picture of a person trespassin'.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 6 years 1 week ago

As I have said before, the person who would wander without permission on your land "just" for the enjoyment or looking for sheds, mushrooms, etc is quite likely to see something else they want, figure you will never know, and help themselves. A neighbor to our hunting property that has permission to be there had a 2 seat tree stand stolen a few weeks ago. What are they odds that someone spotted this on an earlier, "harmless" walk and came back for it later?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I agree with the above comment. More laws? Hell, the laws we have don't get enforced.It's called trespassing. Enforce those laws and it should be enough.Jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve Creek wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I posted this same post on my blog and someone made a great comment:"We don’t need new laws that only control the law abiding, we need our existing laws to be enforced with strong penalties - large fines & jail time."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott K wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Kudos to Jack! He's right on the money. We don't need a shed season and we don't need to give our legislators any more reasons to increase their hold over the laws governing sporstman. Furthermore, our DNR doesn't even have the resources or staff to curb poaching,trespassing and various other violations that are committed throughout the year, let alone trying to "police" a shed season. People simply need to respect private landowners. Many people would be pleasantly surprised with a landowners response if they just ask!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

wow, I was blind to this. Never here in my area of south western New York have we heard or had problems of shed poachin'. I have 200 acres of land my neighbor has 150 and my neighbor on the other side has 180 and we all let each other walk on our land. It helps that I've lived here for 68 years (my whole life) and same with my neighbors. I guess depending on the situation and where you live shed regs might be necesarry. But I don't know know how bad it is in other places so I guess my view really isn't accurate cause I've got no back ground info on shed poaching first hand. This was a very interesting and informative article.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 1 week ago

So what's next, a shed-hunting license?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jack wrote 6 years 1 week ago

As the article notes, a few jerks screw it up for everyone else, to the point where the the government has to step in and screw it up a little more.While states vary in their regulations as to the treatment of private property, here in Ohio most folks I know wouldn't entertain the thought of entering another man's property without permission.As for public land, I suppose it is really up to the local officials whether to regulate removal of any item (be it mushrooms, firewood, wild flower or shed antlers).Asking a state or federal government to figure it out and regulate it, in my view, needlessly complicates things. In Ohio we rely to a large extent upon the experience and knowledge of wildlife management folks, many of whom are hunters. There are in the field everyday and seem to provide the best intelligence for these types of decisions.Asking a bureaucrat or a politician to make these determinations seems a pointless and potentially ruinous exercise.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from DJM wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Thanks for the help guys.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott Bestul wrote 6 years 1 week ago

DJM: Critters will chew up sheds long before they'll rot away. I've found some that have been laying for a year or more. You'll still find antlers at the end of May, you just might have to look harder if the vegetation is greening up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

DJM,Animals such as mice and porcupines will chew on the antlers and widdle some of it down. But I don't believe they break down.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DJM wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Quick question: I'm new to shed hunting, was wondering if sheds ever go bad? i.e., is it possible for me to go out at the end of may looking for them? Or will the antlers be destroyed by them? I ask b/c im in school and dont have alot of time.Thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from I'm in school right now wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I know shed hunting is fun, but when you get to the point that wildlife is getting disrupted, you should probably stop. If you are going to bring out a dog shed hunting, then keep control of it. When we go into the woods, we are the guests, not the animals. Why do they have to be harassed by people who do not know what the heck they are doing. It is just the couple of retards that ruin it for everyone.Nate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rob wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Although I'm generally averse to more regulation, yes, I think the fact that it's now possible to make a profit from sheds will render a lot of people too stupid to leave animals alone when they're vulnerable. As with so many other issues related to the enjoyment of our sport, a few idiots will do their best to ruin things for the rest of us.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jake wrote 6 years 1 week ago

To me this issue is less about shed hunting and more about tresspassing. Why would it ever be ok to cross onto someone else's property without permission? Hunters (Meat or Antler) who do not obey boundries are disrespectfull and dangerous.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

One method I use to keep trouble off my property is telling all the locals that I got motion cameras all over my land and will get you're picture if you trespass.The older locals tell all the new comers this and they aviod my land. My neighbors are the only ones who I let on and they're in their 70s so I don't worry about them. I do have two motion cameras up and never got a picture of a person trespassin'.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 6 years 1 week ago

As I have said before, the person who would wander without permission on your land "just" for the enjoyment or looking for sheds, mushrooms, etc is quite likely to see something else they want, figure you will never know, and help themselves. A neighbor to our hunting property that has permission to be there had a 2 seat tree stand stolen a few weeks ago. What are they odds that someone spotted this on an earlier, "harmless" walk and came back for it later?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I agree with the above comment. More laws? Hell, the laws we have don't get enforced.It's called trespassing. Enforce those laws and it should be enough.Jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve Creek wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I posted this same post on my blog and someone made a great comment:"We don’t need new laws that only control the law abiding, we need our existing laws to be enforced with strong penalties - large fines & jail time."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott K wrote 6 years 1 week ago

Kudos to Jack! He's right on the money. We don't need a shed season and we don't need to give our legislators any more reasons to increase their hold over the laws governing sporstman. Furthermore, our DNR doesn't even have the resources or staff to curb poaching,trespassing and various other violations that are committed throughout the year, let alone trying to "police" a shed season. People simply need to respect private landowners. Many people would be pleasantly surprised with a landowners response if they just ask!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MPN wrote 6 years 1 week ago

wow, I was blind to this. Never here in my area of south western New York have we heard or had problems of shed poachin'. I have 200 acres of land my neighbor has 150 and my neighbor on the other side has 180 and we all let each other walk on our land. It helps that I've lived here for 68 years (my whole life) and same with my neighbors. I guess depending on the situation and where you live shed regs might be necesarry. But I don't know know how bad it is in other places so I guess my view really isn't accurate cause I've got no back ground info on shed poaching first hand. This was a very interesting and informative article.MPN

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 1 week ago

So what's next, a shed-hunting license?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jack wrote 6 years 1 week ago

As the article notes, a few jerks screw it up for everyone else, to the point where the the government has to step in and screw it up a little more.While states vary in their regulations as to the treatment of private property, here in Ohio most folks I know wouldn't entertain the thought of entering another man's property without permission.As for public land, I suppose it is really up to the local officials whether to regulate removal of any item (be it mushrooms, firewood, wild flower or shed antlers).Asking a state or federal government to figure it out and regulate it, in my view, needlessly complicates things. In Ohio we rely to a large extent upon the experience and knowledge of wildlife management folks, many of whom are hunters. There are in the field everyday and seem to provide the best intelligence for these types of decisions.Asking a bureaucrat or a politician to make these determinations seems a pointless and potentially ruinous exercise.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment