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How to Sit and Wait: Bob Robb's Guide to Hunting Whitetail Deer from a Tree Stand or Ground Blind

Get to Your Stand Undetected

This is critical, and it starts with site selection. If leaf cover is sparse, look for a cluster of trees rather than a single one that will make you stand out as a black blob in the sky. Deer do look up.

If you can't go to and from the stand without crossing key game trails or contaminating a crucial piece of cover with human scent, find another spot. Try to set your stand or blind well ahead of the season. You can then trim away brush and remove much of the noisy ground cover along the route. Use a creek, which will cover your noise and scent, to approach the stand if possible. Don't touch any brush with bare skin, and douse yourself thoroughly with a scent-eliminating spray before coming and going. Always walk slowly, looking and listening for game. Mark the route with reflective tacks or ribbon so you can find it easily in the dark.

Build a Ground Blind

Find an area that is slightly elevated above where you expect game to appear. If you're too low, it may be difficult to spot deer as they approach. But watch that you won't be skylined or right in the middle of a primary game trail. Once you have the general area, look for a piece of natural cover to construct your blind around. It can be a large rock or boulder, a fallen tree, or a stump. At the very least, you want a tree at your back because it's important to have cover behind you. It's also nice to be able to lean against a comfortable trunk. Next, gather dead-fall, leaves, and brush, and build it into a wall around where you will sit. Drive sticks into the ground if necessary for support. Your main goal is to shield your hands and lower body and to break up your outline. Don't make it so high that it obstructs your view, and give yourself adequate shooting lanes and plenty of room to move your gun or bow.

Shoot From a Tree Stand

Everyone knows that you should shoot a rifle off a rest, but in a tree stand that can be more complicated than it sounds. There are models that come equipped with a bar that wraps around a seated hunter. If yours does, great. It makes a superb gun rest. Improve it by padding it with a piece of foam pipe insulation to reduce noise. If yours doesn't have a bar like that, buy one of the commercially made monopods designed to support a firearm; some are intended specifically for use in a tree stand. Add a piece of old carpet to the stand's platform to support the monopod and you're in business.

Silence Your Stand

What sounds like a squeak at home becomes a piercing shriek in the woods. First, give your stand a preseason makeover: replace worn parts, tighten loose screws and bolts, and lubricate all joints and movable parts with grease. Cover the seat (and your seat cushion) with fleece material (old hunting clothes work perfectly).Top the platform with an outdoor carpet that will keep your boots from scraping across bare metal. Wrap exposed chains and cables with an old hose or foam pipe insulation.

Sit All Day

Deer move all day, so keep a day-long vigil by making sure your stand is comfortable. Bring enough food and water. A paperback book or a notebook to jot down thoughts will help pass the time. Finally, if you need a quick break, climb down and stretch. In a few minutes you'll be refreshed and focused.

Hang a Tree Stand

Every fall, a few hunters who were not careful are found where they fell. Their troubles are over. Job One here is not to join these people. Even if you've recently used the stand, always do a "preflight" check to be certain that it's working properly and that there are no frayed straps or missing parts.

  1. 1 Clear away any rocks or potential hazards from the base of the tree. Put on a climbing harness, strap it to the tree, and only then start attaching the steps or climbing sticks.

  2. 2 Keep steps just a foot or so apart at a 90-degree angle from one another. When climbing, you want your feet to find the next step naturally. Check each step twice to make sure it can bear your weight.

  3. 3 Once you reach the proper height (15 to 20 feet is plenty), trim away branches that will be in your way, then haul the stand up the tree using a heavy pull rope. Never carry it while you climb. Set it so that you can step down onto the platform, not up.

  4. 4 Once you've attached the stand per the manufacturer's instructions, get onto it with your safety belt still fastened to the tree to confirm that it can support you completely. Forcing your weight down onto the platform will help set the stand securely against the trunk. Sit and stand, trimming away any branches that will impair your ability to enter and exit safely.

TRICK PLAY #2 SEEING SUCCESS

It is entirely possible that after zero activity for seven hours, a buck with a bone chandelier on his head will offer you a standing broadside shot at 12 yards for three seconds before vanishing forever. If, at this moment, you are trying to see how much of your bow release will fit into a single nostril or are reading the ingredients of your Hershey's chocolate bar and wondering what, exactly, an "emulsifier" does, you will not shoot this buck. So how do you stay ready? Try this mental exercise. Imagine your paycheck as it wafts out of its envelope onto a flat surface. Now picture a sharp knife cutting it into thirds. One third bursts into flame and turns to ash. That is the part that goes to the government. Another third does the same. That is your mortgage or rent. The remaining third begins to smolder and to slowly consume itself. There goes your vehicle payment, groceries, and beer. That leaves (let's add it up) nothing. In fact, you are so far in debt that you could work for the rest of your life and die owing money. And on the day of your funeral (cremation, actually, since the state is footing the bill) you will receive three notices congratulating you on your eligibility for new credit cards.

Your whole consciousness changes as you realize that killing a deer means survival: You will need the meat to live through the winter. You will tan the hide using the animal's brain and your own urine as softeners, and fashion a shirt, breeches, and moccasins from the leather. From the antlers you will make buttons and simple tools. The hooves will be boiled down to make glue to seal the envelope informing the collection agency and the government that you are no longer responsible for debts incurred in your name. Something has shifted. You no longer measure time in hours and minutes. You are like the Inuit who sits tirelessly with his spear raised by the seal's breathing hole in the ice, knowing that everything depends on one split second. It is not even difficult. It is simply necessary. —Bill Heavey

Comments (21)

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from Bella wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I know I didn't sit long enough. Point taken Bill, I did just everything else you suggested but I didn't sit there long enough. Oh well the woods is always beautiful and the stand gives an unusual perspective.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from MichCityDDS wrote 5 years 3 weeks ago

Make sure to note all the wildlife you see on-stand, and get to know their natural history. Same with trees. Look at how the ground slopes, how water drains, how the wind blows...man, there is plenty to do, and you will learn more about your hunting ground.

I saw waterfowl, fox, squirrels, barred hawks, crows, tons of other birds, a mouse, ground chucks, almost stepped on a pheasant once getting out of the truck--nearly had to go home to change after that one!, and on and on.

Practice moving to take a shot. Text or twitter your pals.

But always keep an eye peeled because those crazy deer seem to appear out of nowhere!

Man, I can hardly wait for Fall!

+12 Good Comment? | | Report
from auburn_hunter wrote 5 years 3 weeks ago

I agree - there is nothing more beautiful than the sun lighting up a hillside and slowly working its way to you. Hearing the woods come alive with the noise of the early risers or those just finding a place to nestle down to sleep. All of this takes on a new perspective when you are elevated 16 feet off the ground. Just please make sure to wear a safety harness and stay locked in when you are sitting in your stand. I would much rather miss a perfect shot because my harness got in the way than be laying on the ground either dead, or worse yet, paralyzed from the neck down.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big C wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

There are several people I know who cannot believe that I can go sit in a tree for several hours and say that I am enjoying myself. It is hard to explain it to them but it is just something that I love to do. I usually think of the other things that I could be doing while I am on stand....that makes me appreciate the time even more.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

great advice, when it comes down to it, patience is everything

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from thuroy wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Well actually,it is patience and good luck. You can do everything right and not get anything, or have to hunt a stand closer to home because you forgot your boots and didn't have time to get back to your desired location resulting in a trophy of a life time.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from joey.henry wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

from out of nowhere they come. it's our place to stop them in their tracks. hard to do if youre sleeping!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bertram wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I have little trouble staying in ladder stand, get cold sometimes. My little voice jabbers a lot and like another said there are a lot of things to see and listen to. My favorite stand is in a low gap on a long ridge and I see bucks there every year, not always shooters, but it's always interesting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FoxValleyGameChef wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

This is a great article...I am one who never sat in a treestand during archery season for longer than three hours a day...until this year-sat out all day and didn't see a thing, however I increased my chances of seeing something by not moving trees, climbing up and down or coming in and out of the woods...next season, I will definitely be sitting all day more often- hopefully with some luck.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buker wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

Couldn't of said it better. I am amazed at the number of so called "Veteran Hunters" who really don't have a clue how to hunt big whitetails effectively.Tree stands with no cover, out in the open, crossing deer trails on the way to a stand, walking through feeding areas in the morning going to treestands spooking deer, not using terrian features to hide your approach to treestands, not paying attention to wind direction, not knowing how big bucks travel ridges...etc..etc...etc.....it amazes me. One reason I have a hard time hunting with just anybody...it's frustrating when one guy hunts smart an your "buddy" is counter productive to your success.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from scott powers wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

to hunt in a tree stand you have to be one deadacated hunter you also have to go out every day. you should switch stands every day have two or more farms or areas to hunting on. if you have a more ative area try to go to that stand as much as possible. if on stand dose not seem produtive dont go to it for a cupple of weeks. iv gone weeks with out seeing deer and when i get the feeling of giving up i dont. i try to go out every day out school.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cas0905 wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

as much as i hate to wait that is the name of the game

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sterndixon wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

If not for the waiting and watching, it wouldn't be hunting; it would be grocery shopping.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GJLOCY wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Last week I sat in my stand (while in rained most of the day)with a camo umbrella cover over me all day. Sure it was miserable out, but a relaxing day. Patience is the key to the hunt. You never know when those smart furry creatures will show up or what you will view that you haven't seen before. I have hunted for over 30 years and learn something new everytime I go out in the woods.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sterndixon wrote 3 years 20 weeks ago

Sitting for long hours on a tree stand has got to be the hardest element of hunting deer. I have started downloading episodes of CarTalk and replaying them on my ipod. The Tappert Brothers help the time pass quickly. On another note, in the South, American Holly trees tend to be plentiful understory trees that hold their green leaves year round. I like to set ladder stands against trees that have 10-15 ft. hollies growing close to them to provide natural cover for the ladder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Hunting from a treestand is not really complicated, but you have to always think safety first. Never hunt without a safety harness,PERIOD, it happens way to fast to change the outcome. I don"t like leaving those nasty little tell all flags hanging through the woods.Deer are not that stupid first off and secondly you are tipping off others to where you hunt.Not to mention the scent that gets left by everybody that touches them and they are eye sores. As for getting down and stretching? When I get down its to go home. I use a climber and I'll only hunt a tree 1 morning/day or 1 night and the following morning only. Then I am off to another stand site away from where I just hunted that last stand site. 99% of all the deer I have shot were all shot the very first time I hunted that site or the following morning if I hung the stand at night. Hunting a trophy buck is like playing chess with a master chess player. You have to continually make moves until your opponient is in checkmate. When scouting an area to hunt it is months before hand with plenty of notes and GPS cordinates wrote down. Then when its time to hunt there are no clues to other hunters as to what I have found. Punch in cordinate for correct winds and follow the GPS in the dark without any teltail lights shining through the woods. I hunt 3 or 4 states a year on public land and very seldom use a light except to track a shot deer after sunset. I guess I am just different in that respect.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Hunting from a treestand is not really complicated, but you have to always think safety first. Never hunt without a safety harness,PERIOD, it happens way to fast to change the outcome. I don"t like leaving those nasty little tell all flags hanging through the woods.Deer are not that stupid first off and secondly you are tipping off others to where you hunt.Not to mention the scent that gets left by everybody that touches them and they are eye sores. As for getting down and stretching? When I get down its to go home. I use a climber and I'll only hunt a tree 1 morning/day or 1 night and the following morning only. Then I am off to another stand site away from where I just hunted that last stand site. 99% of all the deer I have shot were all shot the very first time I hunted that site or the following morning if I hung the stand at night. Hunting a trophy buck is like playing chess with a master chess player. You have to continually make moves until your opponient is in checkmate. When scouting an area to hunt it is months before hand with plenty of notes and GPS cordinates wrote down. Then when its time to hunt there are no clues to other hunters as to what I have found. Punch in cordinate for correct winds and follow the GPS in the dark without any teltail lights shining through the woods. I hunt 3 or 4 states a year on public land and very seldom use a light except to track a shot deer after sunset. I guess I am just different in that respect.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Redbone wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I hunt from a treelounge. 7 or 8 Hours in stand not a problem. Very good article with great tips. One thing I recommend is a wide mouth pee bottle. I speak from experience. Always wear a safety vest or harness also.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ken Kueppers wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I was never able to sit all day. The guys I hunted with knew it and loved when I got down early and drove a deer to them on my way out of the woods. THEN I found the hand held video game. I hear the hissing out there. Got it from the guys at camp too! Guess who shoots a deer every year. I can sit all day now. When things slow down in the woods a few games of solitare fill some time. OH, and guess who carry games in their day packs now. Yup, most of the guys from camp. They work in the wind and most are lighted so you can get in earlier and still have something to do until the sun shows up. Suprise the guys and sit all day next fall. Just don't tell them how you do it, at least not right away.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from footbasebl wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

good advice everyone.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Gutierrez wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

I LOVE hunting with a passion and love the cold winter weather also, but sitting in a bare hang on metal tree stand with no cushion in Michigan in dead winter in December makes for some hard hunting. I sit until my feet get numb or until my eye lids form ice, then I sit a little longer because just as soon as I decide to climb down, a shooter will come walking in. The best place to be is in a tree stand looking over the distance waiting for the crunch of a stick or leaf, know that it could be the buck you have been waiting for and you realize that yer no longer cold or thinking about being cold, yer feeling warm and in predator mode. Thats how I feel every year during the winter hunts. staying still is the easy part because the yer so cold you don't feel like moving. A strong mind and will to hunt means more to me than how warm I am. We get out of it what we put into it, so I sit from sunrise to sunset, thats the only way I can say I seen nothing all day then to not be sure if anything came in. It's better to know then to wonder if you could have seen any deer that day. Make it count and sit as long as you can, that last hour can make all the difference in the world.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from MichCityDDS wrote 5 years 3 weeks ago

Make sure to note all the wildlife you see on-stand, and get to know their natural history. Same with trees. Look at how the ground slopes, how water drains, how the wind blows...man, there is plenty to do, and you will learn more about your hunting ground.

I saw waterfowl, fox, squirrels, barred hawks, crows, tons of other birds, a mouse, ground chucks, almost stepped on a pheasant once getting out of the truck--nearly had to go home to change after that one!, and on and on.

Practice moving to take a shot. Text or twitter your pals.

But always keep an eye peeled because those crazy deer seem to appear out of nowhere!

Man, I can hardly wait for Fall!

+12 Good Comment? | | Report
from auburn_hunter wrote 5 years 3 weeks ago

I agree - there is nothing more beautiful than the sun lighting up a hillside and slowly working its way to you. Hearing the woods come alive with the noise of the early risers or those just finding a place to nestle down to sleep. All of this takes on a new perspective when you are elevated 16 feet off the ground. Just please make sure to wear a safety harness and stay locked in when you are sitting in your stand. I would much rather miss a perfect shot because my harness got in the way than be laying on the ground either dead, or worse yet, paralyzed from the neck down.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I know I didn't sit long enough. Point taken Bill, I did just everything else you suggested but I didn't sit there long enough. Oh well the woods is always beautiful and the stand gives an unusual perspective.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big C wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

There are several people I know who cannot believe that I can go sit in a tree for several hours and say that I am enjoying myself. It is hard to explain it to them but it is just something that I love to do. I usually think of the other things that I could be doing while I am on stand....that makes me appreciate the time even more.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

great advice, when it comes down to it, patience is everything

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from thuroy wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Well actually,it is patience and good luck. You can do everything right and not get anything, or have to hunt a stand closer to home because you forgot your boots and didn't have time to get back to your desired location resulting in a trophy of a life time.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from joey.henry wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

from out of nowhere they come. it's our place to stop them in their tracks. hard to do if youre sleeping!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buker wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

Couldn't of said it better. I am amazed at the number of so called "Veteran Hunters" who really don't have a clue how to hunt big whitetails effectively.Tree stands with no cover, out in the open, crossing deer trails on the way to a stand, walking through feeding areas in the morning going to treestands spooking deer, not using terrian features to hide your approach to treestands, not paying attention to wind direction, not knowing how big bucks travel ridges...etc..etc...etc.....it amazes me. One reason I have a hard time hunting with just anybody...it's frustrating when one guy hunts smart an your "buddy" is counter productive to your success.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from GJLOCY wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Last week I sat in my stand (while in rained most of the day)with a camo umbrella cover over me all day. Sure it was miserable out, but a relaxing day. Patience is the key to the hunt. You never know when those smart furry creatures will show up or what you will view that you haven't seen before. I have hunted for over 30 years and learn something new everytime I go out in the woods.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bertram wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I have little trouble staying in ladder stand, get cold sometimes. My little voice jabbers a lot and like another said there are a lot of things to see and listen to. My favorite stand is in a low gap on a long ridge and I see bucks there every year, not always shooters, but it's always interesting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FoxValleyGameChef wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

This is a great article...I am one who never sat in a treestand during archery season for longer than three hours a day...until this year-sat out all day and didn't see a thing, however I increased my chances of seeing something by not moving trees, climbing up and down or coming in and out of the woods...next season, I will definitely be sitting all day more often- hopefully with some luck.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from scott powers wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

to hunt in a tree stand you have to be one deadacated hunter you also have to go out every day. you should switch stands every day have two or more farms or areas to hunting on. if you have a more ative area try to go to that stand as much as possible. if on stand dose not seem produtive dont go to it for a cupple of weeks. iv gone weeks with out seeing deer and when i get the feeling of giving up i dont. i try to go out every day out school.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cas0905 wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

as much as i hate to wait that is the name of the game

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Hunting from a treestand is not really complicated, but you have to always think safety first. Never hunt without a safety harness,PERIOD, it happens way to fast to change the outcome. I don"t like leaving those nasty little tell all flags hanging through the woods.Deer are not that stupid first off and secondly you are tipping off others to where you hunt.Not to mention the scent that gets left by everybody that touches them and they are eye sores. As for getting down and stretching? When I get down its to go home. I use a climber and I'll only hunt a tree 1 morning/day or 1 night and the following morning only. Then I am off to another stand site away from where I just hunted that last stand site. 99% of all the deer I have shot were all shot the very first time I hunted that site or the following morning if I hung the stand at night. Hunting a trophy buck is like playing chess with a master chess player. You have to continually make moves until your opponient is in checkmate. When scouting an area to hunt it is months before hand with plenty of notes and GPS cordinates wrote down. Then when its time to hunt there are no clues to other hunters as to what I have found. Punch in cordinate for correct winds and follow the GPS in the dark without any teltail lights shining through the woods. I hunt 3 or 4 states a year on public land and very seldom use a light except to track a shot deer after sunset. I guess I am just different in that respect.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Hunting from a treestand is not really complicated, but you have to always think safety first. Never hunt without a safety harness,PERIOD, it happens way to fast to change the outcome. I don"t like leaving those nasty little tell all flags hanging through the woods.Deer are not that stupid first off and secondly you are tipping off others to where you hunt.Not to mention the scent that gets left by everybody that touches them and they are eye sores. As for getting down and stretching? When I get down its to go home. I use a climber and I'll only hunt a tree 1 morning/day or 1 night and the following morning only. Then I am off to another stand site away from where I just hunted that last stand site. 99% of all the deer I have shot were all shot the very first time I hunted that site or the following morning if I hung the stand at night. Hunting a trophy buck is like playing chess with a master chess player. You have to continually make moves until your opponient is in checkmate. When scouting an area to hunt it is months before hand with plenty of notes and GPS cordinates wrote down. Then when its time to hunt there are no clues to other hunters as to what I have found. Punch in cordinate for correct winds and follow the GPS in the dark without any teltail lights shining through the woods. I hunt 3 or 4 states a year on public land and very seldom use a light except to track a shot deer after sunset. I guess I am just different in that respect.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Redbone wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I hunt from a treelounge. 7 or 8 Hours in stand not a problem. Very good article with great tips. One thing I recommend is a wide mouth pee bottle. I speak from experience. Always wear a safety vest or harness also.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ken Kueppers wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I was never able to sit all day. The guys I hunted with knew it and loved when I got down early and drove a deer to them on my way out of the woods. THEN I found the hand held video game. I hear the hissing out there. Got it from the guys at camp too! Guess who shoots a deer every year. I can sit all day now. When things slow down in the woods a few games of solitare fill some time. OH, and guess who carry games in their day packs now. Yup, most of the guys from camp. They work in the wind and most are lighted so you can get in earlier and still have something to do until the sun shows up. Suprise the guys and sit all day next fall. Just don't tell them how you do it, at least not right away.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from footbasebl wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

good advice everyone.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sterndixon wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

If not for the waiting and watching, it wouldn't be hunting; it would be grocery shopping.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sterndixon wrote 3 years 20 weeks ago

Sitting for long hours on a tree stand has got to be the hardest element of hunting deer. I have started downloading episodes of CarTalk and replaying them on my ipod. The Tappert Brothers help the time pass quickly. On another note, in the South, American Holly trees tend to be plentiful understory trees that hold their green leaves year round. I like to set ladder stands against trees that have 10-15 ft. hollies growing close to them to provide natural cover for the ladder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Gutierrez wrote 1 year 51 weeks ago

I LOVE hunting with a passion and love the cold winter weather also, but sitting in a bare hang on metal tree stand with no cushion in Michigan in dead winter in December makes for some hard hunting. I sit until my feet get numb or until my eye lids form ice, then I sit a little longer because just as soon as I decide to climb down, a shooter will come walking in. The best place to be is in a tree stand looking over the distance waiting for the crunch of a stick or leaf, know that it could be the buck you have been waiting for and you realize that yer no longer cold or thinking about being cold, yer feeling warm and in predator mode. Thats how I feel every year during the winter hunts. staying still is the easy part because the yer so cold you don't feel like moving. A strong mind and will to hunt means more to me than how warm I am. We get out of it what we put into it, so I sit from sunrise to sunset, thats the only way I can say I seen nothing all day then to not be sure if anything came in. It's better to know then to wonder if you could have seen any deer that day. Make it count and sit as long as you can, that last hour can make all the difference in the world.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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