Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Electrifying Muzzleloaders: CVA's New Electronic Ignition System

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Gun Nuts
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

January 09, 2007

Electrifying Muzzleloaders: CVA's New Electronic Ignition System

By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

Arcignition_silo71

Here’s one to weigh in on: Three years ago, Remington came out with an
electronic ignition system for centerfire cartridges that replaced the
conventional one with a trigger that closed a circuit and zapped a
current into an electronic primer, which ignited the powder charge. The
Etronx system worked very well, but did not succeed commercially for
reasons known only beyond my pay grade.

Now, CVA has come up with some very similar to Etronix system in a
black-powder rifle. The .50 muzzle-loader, called Electra, dispenses
with the beloved 209 shotgun primer, and relies instead upon electronic
circuitry (see photo) that sends them volts right into the powder
charge. So what you get is a no-movement trigger, lightning-fast
ignition, more uniform powder burning, and less mess to clean up.

Electra is powered by a 9-volt lithium battery that is good for 500
shots. That noise you hear is Jim Bridger whirling in his grave.

Now there are two ways to view this:
Electra is an amazing step forward in black powder shooting, and deserves to be a monstrous success.

Electra runs counter to the whole idea of using a muzzleloader, where
you’re supposed to be using a primitive weapon. Why not have done with
it and develop cartridges for the thing?

Which side are you on?

Comments (96)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Paul Botha wrote 5 years 23 weeks ago

Hi, its me agin from South Africa, and I did go and buy the Electra.All I can say is WOW. This rifle has relkindled my interest in hunting and shooting just be cause it is so different yet so simple.Quite a few down this neck of the woods have bought these rifles, and everything, (including our largest antelope, the Eland, which is huge) that they shoot seems to just fall down right there. some even seem confident of shooting a Cape buffalo with this .50! I'm waiting for our hunting season (not legal, just the way it's done, better for drying meat and all) from May to August.On the range, a beauty. It shoots 300 grain Hornady .44 XTPs with sabots, really nicely even beyond 150 yards. It groups around 2 inches with most bullet weights, with properly matched charges at 100 meters/110 yards. I have seen a friend shoot just under an inch at 100 meters with one.We use a South African BP substitute called Sannadex (read up on whitesmoke.co.za). It also really likes those Pyrodex pellets the US guys are so lucky to be able to get. I use a moden telescopic sight, because anything to help proper placement of a bullet is ethical hunting, more so for those whose eyes are not so keen.And, the only incidents thus far are people who forget to scrub the face of the "sparkplug" clean now and then, requiring a dismantle.All the concern about safety is really just uncalled for. Im sure (and can now see) that no company in modern, litigation-happy USA would release an unsafe rifle. Much safer that carrying a bunch of primers in your pocket...Shoot an Electa, you know you want to...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dogboy wrote 5 years 26 weeks ago

Have been looking for information on the Electra and ran across this page. I'm firmly in the boat with the guy from the southern tip of Africa. I live in a state (MD) where you can hunt archery, muzzleloader (including the Electra), and shotgun. No rifle. Nada. Ever. But they even say a muzzleloader is considered unloaded for transport if the battery is removed. So it is apparent that they know and approve of the Electra and/or the Etronix.With all that being said, I'm all for an easier way to get longer range within what the state allows. And for me, after shooting my first deer, it is all about getting meat, nothing more. Heck, I'd use a remote airborne platform with infrared detection, laser targeting, and guided projectiles if the gov't and my finances would allow. Nothing could be better than walking out in the field and picking up my freshly killed package of meat and taking it home to process. I used to have grand visions of the perfect shot on the magnificent buck, but like I said, after the first perfect shot on a deer, I just want more meat. I'm surprised by all the weeping and gnashing of teeth regarding muzzleloaders and primitive weapons. I guess I'm just not a good hunter.So, anyone got any good concrete information on the reliability of the circuitry?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BossHoss888 wrote 5 years 29 weeks ago

I will be buying the CVA Electra. As far as worrying about circuitry failing and the gun being junk, it comes with a lifetime warranty, so I will get it fixed if it were to ever happen. I tried to look up any news of accidents or injury from the CVA Electra and found none. I am sure the manufacturer made sure that the weapon was a safe firearm as all manufacturers do, before releasing it to todays "sue happy" public. As far as the technological advances in the sport are concerned, I am all for anything making an outing more accurate. Some hunters have earned a bad name using not so accurate weapons leaving animals injured and not following up to retrieve them. And to you whiny guys crying because of advancing technology.......I guess you will have to call whoever it is you call with your "crank phone" to write your replies here on the internet for you, because I am sure you did not use advancing technology to write your negative comments about advancing technology. By the way, I am sorry if I offended any of you by asking you to use your crank phone. I will send a formal apology in a smoke signal. Nostalgia is a wonderful thing, but so is advancing technology. Why not stop fighting one or the other and celebrate both?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lone Star 45 wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

CVA's New Electronic Ignition System???First: how many times have you had electronics failSecond: The colder it gets, the less reliable are batteries especially 9 voltThird: Possible of accidental discharge when loading!Fourth: If you have a charge in the barrel, it’s considered loaded even in transport and against the law in most states and defiantly unsafe!Fifth: It’s illegal in my State!GAME OVER!CASE CLOSED!NICE TRY CITY BOYS!I’ll stick to my Encore Thank You!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

...with iron sights.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

Believe it or not my piece of crap kit gun (I'm no artist and there must be some secret to bluing) outshoots all my in-lines... patched round balls and a two inch group from 100 yards.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

Dick Lewis,You make some good points. However, because of the way the barrels were made a truly primitive flintlock would be somewhat dangerous to shoot regardless of cost. There are still plenty of artisans that build them just like the old time Pennsylvania gunsmiths did it. The only exception is the barrels are made of modern steel. They look the same but are much safer to shoot. I have owned 4 inlines but, keep going back to my Lancaster style longrifle 'cause it's much more fun. also a beauty to look at. Building them is considered an art form.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dick Lewis wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

C'mon guys! It's not about the gun. It's about the hunting; and I mean the total experience, the preparation, the anticipation, the camaraderie. the smell of the woods, the excitement building. We've all had misfires, but that's part of the package. Makes a good story back at camp, and will be remembered just as long as the day you got the big one.Growing up in the fifties, when there were only three deer in Ohio, two of those in a zoo, and reading everything Jack O’Connor wrote, I learned that it wasn’t important what you carried into the woods, or how much meat you dragged out. The ultimate satisfaction was a humane one shot kill.Anything that adds to that likelihood is an improvement and should be lauded. As far as primitive weapons, there are still some around, but most of them are in a glass case and are too valuable to shoot.If you want to worry about something, worry about the lack of new hunters coming on to replace us when we’re being spoon-fed from a small jar.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Paul Botha wrote 5 years 35 weeks ago

Well, down here on the Southern tip of Africa, where we have to go through an expensive, annoying and time consuming (months/years) wait for a firearms licence and relicence every 10 years, the licence exemption for muzzleloaders makes the CVA Electra a winner. I wish CVA would punt them down this way, I was lucky to find one in a "progressive" gunshop.A muzzleloader is the only type of rifle I can buy and walk out with. (Of course I must still get a permit for the black powder or equivalent, but that thankfully only takes days).The muzzeloaders down this way do seem to favour percussion caps and side ignition guns, but there are advantages to the Electra and the fan base is growing: Lock time is reduced, rifle format looks like a modern centrefire, reducing the odd looks from landowners (we have almost no public hunting land, if any) who are wary of people hunting with smokepoles without telescope sights.I like the simplicity, the large caliber, and the fact that my not-so-hot eyes can be aided by a telescope sight. Anything that can assit the muzzeloading hunter to place his/her shots better is a good thing. Plus it shoots 400 grain conical groups of 1 MOA!If there is a "traditional season" (we have no such season and many outfitters in Africa won't let you near their land with a bow or a rifle with no sights, for obvious reasons) one can understand objections. As a weatherproof muzzleloader for general hunting it makes a lot of sense, especially on tough game.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mr. Sauers wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I'm all for this electric ignition system. Nothing is worse than fumbling with primers in the freezing cold while wearing gloves. If batteries are a concern, I fail to see why you couldn't keep a couple 9-volts in your pocket.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from James Hawk wrote 6 years 2 weeks ago

I have actually wondered why firearms in general haven't used such a piezo system. The idea of using impact sensitive chemicals seems more primitive to me. I think the idea would ultimately be more reliable as well as less corrosive. If s*** hit the fan and society broke down, I think I would rather have a piezo system than a stash of caps. Seems like finding a battery (and some systems are even batteryless) would be easier than trying to locate a source of percussion caps, primers, or their contents (lead azide, sodium perchlorate). Remember why the old mountain men preferred flintlock - for the same reason.So I am all for technological improvements on all firearms, BUT that doesn't mean that I agree these weapons should still be regarded as primitive per state hunting laws. I think the designation is arbitrary, but it should still stand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Looking at that circuit board and that capacitor, it’s a matter of time that recoil and environmental conditions will take it out $$$$$$$$$$!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Go with a flinter when the experience is more important than the kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Bubba,The fun is in tinkering with the lock. Once you get your flint adjusted just right. The lock time on a quality flinter will approach a caplock. A follow up shot is about as fast as any other ML. If we really need meat or in wet weather I switch to an inline or caplock. It is amazing to me that the old timers killed so many critters with flinters. If you get the chance to examine a well made long rifle by all means take a good look. My gun was made in 1993 by a fellow named Bingham from Ohio and it is worth the $1500 it cost back then. Sometimes I just pick it up, look at it and imagine what it would be like if that was the only guns available. It has a 39" Getz swamped barrel, engraved brass patchbox, carved curly maple full stock. Siler lock and Davis double set trigger. It is more accurate than I can hold and the balance is like a Purdey shotgun. No factory gun can compare.Clay, Thanks for the scope info.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

BubbaI’m one of those if it does suppose to work? WORK! I can see myself in a dear stand in the freezing cold reloading a flinter yet alone trying to keep the powder in the tray! LOL!PISSO IGNITION?WHATS NEXT!Here’s your sign!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Del in KSThank you, but no! I have enough difficulty with the cap lock, can't imagine "me" trying to deal with a flint lock! I'd be like one of Clay's "howling monkey's" trying to reload a flinter!If that's all you shoot, I admire you!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Pizzo lighters are nice to have, but pisso ignition?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

IMO a good ol' flinter is more fun to shoot than any cap lock (currently I have 3).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Bubba,You can crank up the difficulty factor by going to a flintlock longrifle. I carry a possibles bag with lead balls, patches,powder measure and 2 powder horns (1 of FFFg and primer horn). Couple yr ago shot a big doe 40 yd with 50cal rd ball. Broke both front legs with complete pass thru.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

What do I see hanging off to the lower left of the picture of the circuit board? A battery! AAAAAAA BAAATTEERRRYYYY!!!!! What happens when a battery gets cold? How many times you have picked up something and it doesn’t work and you just changed the batteries a few days ago? Sound familiar doesn’t it! Gee Mr. Wizard! I rather have a small hand full of 209 primers or no 11 than a pack full of batteries! Hold still Mr. Big Buck, my battery is dead! CVA, is that a special battery? How come you’re not using the Energizer! I know why! Thought you pass a fast one didn’t ya! Crack me UP!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Electronic short = KABOOM!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

By the wayI’ll be still shooting my Encore 50 cal Magnum 209, while you’re standing there looking stupid and all wet, GAME OVER!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Jeremiah (John) Johnson? One of my favorite movies! One thing about electronic switches, it’s not a question if it fails, it is when it fails! I’ve been around some of the most advanced avionics, military equipment and to include research and development that makes this stuff so primeval and its all hoopla! Electronic ignition? #209 primer works fantastic for me!Hell, batteries not needed! What happens if you get moisture in it! LMOA!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I guess I learned something. I have a traditional TC New Englander. It never occurred to me that I could hunt in a rainstorm. Really not much of a problem. Up here, ML season is in the first half of December and usually we have around one foot of snow.YooperJack

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

A friend and I hunted Prentice Cooper Wildlife Management Area for about eight hours one day in the 80's with side lock muzzle loaders in the pouring rain. We drove 120 miles we were going to hunt! Never been there and we were young and dumb so we stalked and walked almost continuously and at the end of the day my friend looked at me and said we were wasting our time these guns won't fire. I had loaded them both since he was a virgin with his gun and we unloaded them BANG BANG just like that. It even surprised me! We kept the hammer down on the cap all day which is a no no but RWS percussion caps and Goex black powder work rain or shine. Pointing your muzzle down at all times helps but to us that is an instinct..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

YoopHunting in rainy weather is hard with a real front stuffer, bordering on impossible! Keeping everything dry enough to ignite is the ultimate "exercise in futility"!Used to load my rifle in the house, cap the nipple, and wrap rifle with Saran Wrap, lower hammer gingerly, and go hunting!Boy, Clay will love this blog, running around with a half-cocked, capped muzzle loader!If you fired a shot, reloading was tough! One drop of water in the wrong place was/is a disaster!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Hey Bubba that's great news! While I don't bowhunt, I do want more deer killed. There are a lot of folks in our age group who cannot bowhunt in a traditional manner. If this gets more of them in the woods, more power to them.YooperJackP.S. I can't think of any handicap that electric muzzleloaders would help.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I suppose I'm a steer Clay, I've made many a mile with Rem No. 11 percussion cap in my pockets! LMAO!!!Electronic Muzzleloaders!?Wonder how Jeremiah (John) Johnson would have fared with an electronic muzzleloader!?Would I shoot one? At a range, yes, just for the kicks and giggles of saying I had shot one!Would I hunt with one? I don't think so Scooter! I still carry a "possibles bag"! I don't carry speed loaders, I carry a powder horn, powder measure and fffG black powder!If it must be loaded with powder and projectile "through" the muzzle, it's a muzzle loader. Muzzle loader has nothing to do with ignition system!BubbaP.S. Clay, come on - "howler monkeys"? LOL!!BTW - I'll be x-bow hunting this fall!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

DavidIf using a shotgun the next step in the evolution of the muzzleloader, you haven’t checked out the newest line of sabot slugs for shotguns!Two weekends ago I test fire my new Remington Model 11-87™ Sportsman® ShurShot™ Synthetic Turkey. I dropped a modified choke in and it shot slugs like a rifle. 75 yards and stacked them! Check it out David, time to retool, like I did

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Big John TCarrying a primer in the pocket is how dangerous and explain to me how Sir

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Electrifying Muzzleloaders: CVA's New Electronic Ignition System?Not legal in Arkansas, GAME OVER!I do not trust electronic switches! Electronic switches on a muzzle loader, give me a break! I wonder where those howler monkeys that are hell bent to keep crossbows out of the woods on this one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Danny wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I like Shot guns and Hand guns!!!!!!!!!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Daniel wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

What kind of gun did Daniel Boone use when he whet hunting

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from David wrote 6 years 16 weeks ago

In Ohio we can't use center fire rifles.Shotgun slugs are a poor substitute. I have used my inline muzzleloader during gun season and muzzleloading season. This gun is the next step in the evolution of the muzzleloader. If tradition is so important why not press for a special spear and club season?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave in St Pete wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

Can't use them in Florida during muzzle loader season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big John T wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

I own and hunt with the Electra and it's no more modern than any other inline except you don't have to carry dangerous primers around in your pocket while you hunt. It's a breeze to clean and sweet to shoot. I've done work for ammo manufacturers and know how dangerous a primer is loose in your pocket it can make you a steer...CVA has a winner here...BJT

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from outdoormore wrote 6 years 27 weeks ago

What next? Laser beams?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kirk of GA. wrote 6 years 29 weeks ago

I think I'll try an Electra. Sounds like a great gun.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ed wrote 6 years 40 weeks ago

The folks that say that there is no place for a gun like this I feel aren't thinking things through. I mean, if my Native fore fathers had the compound bow with muzzy broadheads and carbon arrows I know they would have used them. Just like when they were first introduced to the firearm. They stepped up to using them. People that say that improving the muzzleloader by adding an electronic device is rediculous, they are just wrong in my book. People said the same thing about the in lines that use 209 caps, but now they are okay to most and the ones that own them love them. How many people that think this is silly have cell phones? Advancing is a way of life. I feel everyone should take the time to go to the CVA site and watch the video about the Electra. This looks like an awesome gun. I am also considering the game in a way.... With this electric ignition you get a full powder burn which is going to give you a harder hitting bullet which will usually result in a faster kill. It will also help with accuracy because there isn't a delay when you pull the trigger so this in turn will make the shooter more accurate. There are a lot of good things about this rifle and I for one have mine on order!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Warren wrote 6 years 40 weeks ago

As a techno guy I don't have any problem with it. I'm not into traditionalism for its own sake. I just want to hunt some game. Looks like it improves load times and ballistics. OK, so where can I get one? Every dealer is sold out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jason wrote 7 years 3 weeks ago

it is easy to understand why some people feel this weapon does not belong in the primitive season, but its harder to understand how the ver same people can gladly accepts mossy oak polymer stocks, inline designs, shotgun primers, sabots, high power scopes and non-blackpowder preshaped pellets for propellant. either the primitive season should be primitive and we'd all be hunting with kentucky rifles and bp that we created using nitrates collected from our own urine, or lets just call it muzzleloader season and let anything that is loaded from the muzzle pass.the bottom of the line is that this is a technology breakthrough as huge as the transition from flint to percussion and the sad thing is many hunters do not seem to realise this. it will hardly allow you to bag bigger bucks, but it will create a rifle that goes bang no matter what weather, that will take a fraction of the time to clean, and with a trigger-pull so crisp that it would have costed $500 by itself with conventional technology.the principle is correct. if cva has engineered it right, this is the beginning of the end for percussion primes. amen.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 4 weeks ago

People using the analogy of traditional bows vs compounds is flawed.Though a compound bow is easier to learn and shoot, at the end of the day it has the about same effective range as a traditional bow.Inlines have a much longer effective range than traditional guns.Basicaly the "traditional" aspect of the season was lost when inlines were allowed. This gun is just one more step in the evolution of todays muzzloading guns. Don't like it, but looks like muzzloading technology willcontinue to"improve". (Remember, companies want to sell more rifles than then their competitors)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FLETCH wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

Idaho just outlawed in line ML during the primitive season. What will make or break the CVA is the how many states will call the electronic ignition primitive and allow them. I have mixed emotions about in lines as a primitive, but use one because it will allow me to harvest a deer with less chance of wounding. I do feel that using a single shot make me safer and I use more caution because I have only the one shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoder wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

As a deer hunter in Indiana where the rifle is not an option due to laws, I welcome anything that makes the muzzle loader a better hunting tool.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

I agree. A narrow special interest group stole a chunk of the season from the general population of hunters by creating an arbitrary restriction on methods of take. And now that others are taking up the same hobby with MLs (albeit in-lines), they're gnashing their teeth because privileged access is being eroded. Cry me a river, babies.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from G-Man wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

The muzzleloading deer seasons in most states came to be because of the efforts of buckskinners and traditional muzzleloading rifle shooters. They spent their time and money to lobby the lawmakers to give them a season away from MODERN guns and MODERN hunters.If you like modern guns then feel free to use them in the modern gun season and stay out of the woods during muzzleloading season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

i think you guys look too deep into the matter, all muzzle loaders are the same..give er take a few advancements here or there. They all use bullet, some sort of powder, and regardless of wut kind of muzzle loader you, you till have to put in the time and effort and do a little thing called hunting. It dont matter if ur shooting a machine gun, if you cant find the animals...its a no go, regardless of gun.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

@John -Hey I think that's great. Look, we'd *all* love to have fewer people on the landscape who take shots at targets beyond their ability, shoot at stuff they can't see, and so forth. But I have some fairly old classic hunting books from the 19thC that suggest that taking bad shots was quite common during the days of muzzleloading blackpowder rifles. And I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that the full range of yahoo behavior is found among "traditional" muzzleloader hunters as among any other hunters.We'd all like to hunt surrounded by fewer Yahoos. But you're not going to get there by limiting the technology. You're only going to get there by changing attitudes about practicing with your firearm, and taking clean shots at your prey.I (last month) bought a Savage 10ML-II for a variety of reasons including desire to get into ML hunting, safety (of rifle and propellant), and price reduction (in that order).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gunner Benavente wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

All this fancy gadjetry for muzzleloading? I always thought you were supposed to pour the powder down the barrel, push a rag and ball down on top of it, then put a cap on or pour powder into the flashpan. I think THAT is what 'muzzleloaders' are supposed to be doing.Gunner

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Thanks for making my point Mike. Should a scoped inline mean that hunters can abandon the accepted hunting and shooting skills? Certainly not. Unfortunately to some, it does. Just a few weeks ago I sat in my treestand and watched as a guy crashed through a tree line, kicked up a doe, and by the time he got his balance, leveled his scoped inline and took his shot, it was at a target at least 120-130 yds away and running away. Thank God he missed. But I'll bet somebody convinced him his inline with all the gadgets and tricks could do anything. Incidently, this guy even tried to reload quick to get a second shot, but the bullet fell off the end of his barrel from the speed loader and he had to dig for it in the alfalfa. Do I want less competition in the field during primitive season? Yes, this kind of competition. And, by the way, I do carry my powder in a horn, especially when using my flintlock, I don't even own a quad, let alone use one for hunting and while I do drive to where I hunt, it's still a good 1/3 to 1/2 mile hike in to where I hunt. I wear synthetic in the form of hunter orange because the law dictates. If you know of a source of hunter orange buck skins let me know. I do indulge myself 2 modern conveniences, binoculars because I want to see the distance, and a plastic sheet to drag a deer out, because at 54 it makes it a little easier. Am I a snob about this? You bet. Maybe the answer is 2 muzzle loader seasons, one unlimited and the other a true "traditional". Please understand my disdain of the "gadget" mentality is born from listening to hunters at the gun store who truely think that this new gimmick or that will allow them to take that 150 yd shot at a running deer and will be guaranteed an instant kill that will drop on a dime. Am I exaggerating? Ya, a little, but not much. In Ohio, we're now allowed only 3 rounds in the gun during modern firearms season. When this law took affect, the moaning was deafening because all hunters know that firepower is an acceptable substitute for marksmanship. I hear the same thought process when it comes to high tech muzzle loaders. These things will shoot flat out to 300 yds., won't they? Mike, I gather from your remarks your hunting ethics place a high priority on marksmanship, knowing your range limitations, and doing everything possible to insure a clean, swift kill. I applaud and respect that. Unfortunately, there are far too few of you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

"But the "traditionalist" view is simple, please give us a season that is traditional, that "primitive" means more than just muzzle loaded. Keep that one, short season we enjoy limited to side locks, open sights, and powder that really is powder."No I don't think I "missed the point." I think I get the point and I disagree with the agenda. Why should a special season be carved out for people who hunt with "not just a muzzleloader, but a particular KIND of muzzleloader!"Since the claim seems to be "It's the gun that matters" for tradition, rather than all the other equippage, let's consider the guns' performance.Does an in-line of necessity mean that a hunter using one can abandon the hunting skills required to stalk up on an animal? Nope.Does a scoped in-line mean that you can abandon such skills and try to shoot your animal at substantially greater distances? Nope. Indeed, a person trying it would be worse off than a typical unscoped ML hunter and worse off than a typical repeater hunter, because based on what I see 99% of us -- me included -- aren't Delta Force Snipers. It is still the case that most animals are taken at 100 yards or less range, regardless of the action or the way you put the charge and bullet in your gun or set it off.Was I to take a very authentic replica of a Civil War period sniper rifle would it meet the standards of "traditionalists?" Yes. If I were as good a shot as the rifle might permit me to be, would it shoot more accurately at greater distances than most off-the-shelf repeaters? Yes.The point of "traditionlists" is one that I grok. They want a special season all to themselves in which access and therefore competition from other hunters is limited. The claim is about "primitive technology" but the dedication to "primitive" is apparently so shallow that it goes no further than the firing mechanism on the rifle.Were it really about tradition you'd carry your powder in a horn not use any electronic equipment, not use a quad, not drive to your hunt site in a vehicle, nor wear anything made out of synthetic materials. Your tent would be made of canvas. Your sleeping bag made of cotton fabric filled with goose-down. Your lantern, if you had one, would flicker and go out in a stiff breeze.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SW Michigan Hunter wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

No, it doesn't carry the whole primative concept. It is more efficient. I don't hunt archery because of the high rate of wounded animals. If I can get a cleaner kill, I'll put my shotgun, rifle, antique bang stick away and try this out!!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Mike Diehl and others miss the point of the "traditionalist" view. I'm not a total traditionalist, I have a whole rack full of pump shotguns, semiauto .22's, .223 highpowers, even a "liberal" machine gun in the form of a .30 Carbine. I agree that this is probably a really cool developement. The industry has to keep coming up with something new or hunters will get bored. It's the best way for the industry to prompt new sales, some new gizmo that everybody's gotta have. I also agree it's got it's place in the greater scheme of things, along with scopes, powder pellets, sobots, etc. I have a lot of respect for someone who limits themselves to one shot hunting, it shows a lot of discipline in a world of machine gun mentality. But the "traditionalist" view is simple, please give us a season that is traditional, that "primitive" means more than just muzzle loaded. Keep that one, short season we enjoy limited to side locks, open sights, and powder that really is powder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Roger E. Reeves, Sr. wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

With teh un-successful sale of Remington's gun, why would anyone want a electronic B/P gun. For me, the 209 primer is enough. I would not trust a battery for a shot at a trphy W-tail. To me its a waste of money.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bg wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Why are people discussing this in relation to hunting seasons?What does this gun have to do with hunting seasons?Not all guns are used to hunt with, so I don't see why that particular line of thought is relevant to this.I also don't know if everyone that has a muzzleloader does so because they wanted a primitive weapon. I have one because it was on clearance for $40 and it is a .50 caliber. I like big calibers and at that price, I didn't even have to ask my wife if I could buy it!Anyway, people should be allowed to have whatever gun they want I suppose. But, if I was the head of product development at CVA, I would have passed on this idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bg wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Electronic ignition in a blackpowder muzzleloader seems pointless to me. But, I think that guns in the future could go that route (not paired with muzzleloaders though).I saw a post up there somewhere about bows (any) being primitive. Why do people think that modern compound bows are the same as a longbow or a recurve? To me, they are just as advanced as the modern in-line is to a flintlock.By the way, just got my first deer over the weekend with my muzzleloader. It was by far one of the best hunts of my life. Missed a deer in the morning...no second shot. Shot a deer that afternoon and it didn't kill it (bad shot). When I went to finish it off, the pyrodex didn't ignite. Finally got the deer but it wasn't an easy time of things.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SteveC wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Technology is about money - even in hunting.It also allows those who lack most skills to think they're hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

@Dave King and other Defenders Of Tradition.Just curious -- do you all use any of the following when you hunt? A GPS, a digital or electronic analog watch, a radio, clothing or shoes made of synthetic fiber, an illumination device powered by anything other than tallow, paraffin, or whale oil, or any kind of vehicle with an internal combustion engine?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave King wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

this is getting ridiculous. First the inline ML's now Electronics?If this is what you want to Shoot fine but hunt in the proper season MODERN FIREARMS ! We should insist that our states natural resourses dept. return to the primitive firearms statutes rather than ML. inlines are nothing more than a new twist on the modern rifle and Electronics have NO place in the muzzle loader world

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jason wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I really dont see what all the fuss is over. A dealer friend of mine went to a pre SHOT show event at Ellett Brothers distributors in South Carolina last week. The folks from CVA were there with the new electronic ignition muzzleloader. It is called the Electra. Apparently it was the hit of the show. My friend said that the CVA booth was packed to the gills, and there was a lengthy wait just to see the gun up close. Meanwhile, the folks at the competitors booths were literally all alone. As far as the durability of the new system, CVA apparently did extensive testing in very harsh conditions. The CVA rep advised that they took one of the pre-production guns to a remote area in Canada accessable only by float plane, and known only to CVA. They loaded the gun, and placed a small piece of tape over the muzzle to keep moisture out. They left it there for about 25 days and went back to the location. The gun had been exposed to numerous snow/thaw cycles, and did not hesitate to fire the instant the trigger was pulled. They also conducted a similar test where the gun was left in a very swampy area in one of the southern states for about the same length of time, and the result was the same. My friend said that it appears to be a very well made and thought out product, and accurate to boot, as all of the dealers were allowed to shoot the guns at an indoor range. As for primative weapons, who gives a darn as long as people are in the woods hunting and enjoying the outdoors. I for one dont have any desire to run around and play Daniel Boone with a flintlock. I bowhunt, and that quenches my thirst as far as primative weapons go. I may be completely wrong, but I believe that this will be the next big innovation in muzzleloading. Within 2-3 years I bet every manufacturer will offer at least one model with some form of electronic ignition. It is simply much faster not to have to fool with a cap or shotshell primer. Just ram the pellets and sabot home, and pull the trigger. I for one hope that we will continue to see such innovation from the firearms industry, because the day that we dont will be a dark day for all of us who love guns and shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I have an easier solution. Eliminate blackpowder seasons. Anyone who wants to hunt with an ML or a black powder or whatever can do so, but let's not hear any more whining about how this is all about tradition. It's only about paring away a corner of the season for the special olympics version of hunting.To the traditionalist imperialists I have this to say. If you are not hunting with a match-lock arquebus, while wearing hose and a whale bone corset, you're not a "traditionalist." You might as well go to the store and buy your venison as agitate for your local G&F department to fall into a regulatory squabble of rules designed to rain on someone else's parade.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

The solution to undercutting all this modern technology is simple. I don't care if it's a traditional blackpowder rifle or a modern inline rifle with electronic powder ignition if you make all muzzleloaders open sights only you really cut down on the benefits of modern technology. Most people can only shoot to 75-100 yards with open sights. It would make ALL muzzleloaders much more of the short range firearms that the primitive weapons season are supposed to be about.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bill Martin wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

This is missing the whole intention of having a separate season for muzzleloaders. The purpose was to attempt to bag a deer using PRIMATIVE weapons. Today's in-line muzzleloaders and now this electronic ignition idea is nowhere in keeping with the initial intention of having the separate season. Pre-measured powder, modern bullets with sabots, modern shotgun primers and now electronic ignition? What next...... heat seeking bullets. There needs to be closer regulation of the weapons allowed during this season. If you want modern weapons, then hunt during the modern weapon season. If you want the thrill of meeting the challange of taking a deer using a side lock rifle of either caplock or flint lock ignition then you should hunt the muzzleloader season as it was meant to be hunted.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

"All of the reverse momentum will be transfered into automatic injection of the next following round down the muzzel of course (need to keep the sprit) for quick follow up shots"Sounds like you got a "comprehensive plan for victory" there, Saco. ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from william anderson wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

traditional? not!! the people who use an electronic ignition system on their muzzleloader are the same who, probaly, support deer darting competions. this is ridulous!! why even have a " traditional" season, if one is allowed to use this kind of modern technology?? in my opinion, this is going to far.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Taylor wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I spend several months a year hunting the woods of southern Ohio.Though Bow hunting is my first passion,The primitive season is my second love. The true idea of muzzleloader seasons are that they are designed to be challenging.By adding electronic ignition we are just taking one more step away from the traditional.I hope that alot of state divisions of wildlife will look at this weapon and exclude it as an acceptable muzzleloader for the primitive seasons.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

If it doesn't have a side hammer with a rock in it, it's not a REAL muzzleloader. End of argument!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I don't care one thing about it. In my opinion hunting guns with built in electronics just don't mix well. I'll bet you won't see the folks from the Custom Gunmakers Guild build one. It aint right.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

A lot of people have taken away from the meaning of the Black Powder hunt when they allowed the inline style of firearms. And NOW they are playing around with a electric firing mechanism for black power fire arms!! Just think, if it will only fire with or by a recognized finger print, In cold weather I prefur to keep my gloves on and just think about that battery, in cold weather it is going to drain it power a lot faster. Most people think that the Traditional black powder firearm is to much work, and are you going to remember to change your battery and carry spares with you just in case the one in the firearm drains and goes dead, sure. And I am the one still hunting when your electric mechanism fails you in the field.I prefur the old way, the traditional way, I will stick with my smooth bore flint lock and still fill my tag. I like my flint lock because I know it is dependable and I can rely on it to do it job in all type of weather. Modern tech. is great but not were it was set up for traditional style of shooting, Black Powder was set up for the traditionalist who shot the OPEN HAMMER style of black powder firearms and it should return to that, If you hunt with inlines and electric fireing pin fire arms they call black powder guns, they should be only aloud to be used in the modern fire arm hunts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scott wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I love my PA Pellet and would go as far to say that this little number is pushing it as far as being "traditional", especially after reading John's comment. I do agree John. I shoot sabots,pellets and even have fiber optic sights. I can go all out Traditional with this gun if I so wish except for the breech plug that is removable. I like the idea of cleaning this hot number with NO worry when the job is finished. I've heard too many horror stories of the old traditional's meeting thier maker becuase of improper cleaning. I shoot the hell out of mine and she still bellows, smokes,kicks,and smells great! I can't get enough and thats why I named her "Annie." Oh, I almost forgot. Someone out there is gonna buy into the "electronic ignition",It isnt gonna be me!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Call me a stick-in-the-mud, I prefer "traditionalist", but this is absurd. The whole idea for the original "primitive" season was to allow hunters willing to exert a little extra effort the opportunity for an additional firearms hunt. It was bad enough with the advent of centerfires, pre-measured pellets, speed loaders, saboted bullets, scope mounts. Then came shotgun primer systems, plastic and fiberglas stocks, high pressure, "magnum" capable barrels. Now this. Please tell me what's "tradition" or "primitive" about this. They fit just fine for use during a normal gun season, but are totally out of place for the "primitive" season. Hell, why not mount the damn thing on a motorized tripod, replace the scope with a camera, and hook it up to your laptop with target identification software. Then the "hunter" can sit back in his treestand and sleep, or just stay home. After all, with the camera, he can check once in a while to see if he's gotten "his" deer yet, then hire somebody to go out and field dress it for him.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chuck M wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Not to diminish the accomplishments of all the "modern" muzzloaders out there.....but one state for sure - Pennsylvania - has a muzzleloading season after Christmas that requires the use of flintlock rifles with open iron sights, that is no scopes or optics. Bucks may still be harvested provided the hunter has not taken a buck during archery or regular firearms season. It is one of the best times of the year to hunt here in PA......and I cherish the opportunity even with the rain, wind and snow. This approach can make both sides happy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Capt Walt wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

High Voltage Ignition System. Yea why knot.Lets beef up the idea a tad by getting rid of that diry old Black Powder and replacing it with Butane or Map Gas or Gasoline kicked up a notch with a little liquid Oxygen sprayed into the breach by a computer controlled fuel ingector nozzel.Then dispense of those old lead bulletts and patches by replacing them with thermoformed hyperdense non metallic projectiles with "Smart" expanding cores that mushroom only after penetrating a target with specific density algorithums.No more Walnut Stocks. Nah! that wont do. It will have to be Aramyid Carbon Fibers with automatic infered, ultrasonic rangefinders.Recoil? Whats that.All of the reverse momentum will be transfered into automatic injection of the next following round down the muzzel of course (need to keep the sprit) for quick follow up shots; say 15,000 rouns a min? Wait now the design calls for liquid nitrogen cooling of the barrel.Then again? Maybe a Flintlock aint such a bad idea??NEWENGLANDCHARTERS@maine.rr.comhttp://home.maine.rr.com/newengland/

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Don't like it ... nothing like a "squeeze-click-boom."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Micah Steele wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

All of the black powders being produced today are a far cry from the traditional. As long as you still have to put the powder and the bullet down through the muzzle with a ramrod I don't see the issue. I am sure that this ignition system will still have it's issues. Some poor hunter will still have the sights on "the big one" only to have the powder fail to ignite for some reason or another just like always. An just like always, he'll only get one shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

My only reservation to the electronic ignition would be the reliability of ignition, durability of the system towards water/physical abuse and the ability to clean the rifle without harming myself or the ignition system. If you want to hunt like Davey Crockett then buy a Davey Crockett reproduction flintlock and go for it... if you want to hunt and your state will allow, inline ignition, riflescopes, smokeless powder, and/or electronic ignition then hunt with whatever the law will allows. We get our panties wrapped around the axel too tightly sometimes regards what other folks want to do...this type of ignition system is not going to put more game in front of your sights than any other type of system...buy what you want and the law allows then go hunt and stop worrying about what other people are hunting with...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Thomas Hall wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

In his book Tracker, Tom Brown describes how he killed a deer by dropping onto it from a tree and cutting it's throat. If we make that the baseline technique for hunting a deer then I think the question becomes "what level of technology beyond that do you prefer?".Personally my heart belongs to yesterday but my head belongs to tomorrow.My head wants to know if I Can have one of these that averages the wander of the barrel so that when I pull the trigger it always fires at just the right instant? And can I set it to recognize my fingerprint so no one else can fire my gun?My heart wonders if it will add firearms to the list of things that become obsolete in a few months and thrown away in a few years? And will they make ones that talk? "we're sorry, your shot did not go through, please hang up and try your shot again."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ray wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

oh yeah! Just hook it up to a game camera and stay in bed on them cold mornings. Git yer picture and game at the same time, just what we need if they would only legalize it fer trespassers..:-)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ed J wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Now here's a solution in search of a problem

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Archerwvu wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

My gut tells me that this is not going to excite too many folks nor is it going to make hunters run like wildcats to the nearest dealer to obtain one. I can't object to the idea considering I hunt with a compound bow rather than a recurve. Technology shall know no boundaries.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MattWV wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

If people want to use it fine but keep in mind that it's from CVA whose track record isn't exactly sterling; I'm interested to see what kind of bugs pop up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

From a business stand point they might be onto somthing. Each hunter has to decide where their ethics lay.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Of course, would I want a gizmoe'd circuit board igniting my shots? No. But that too is a matter of taste. Someone wants to push the technology envelope it is OK by me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

It's a matter of taste. The only difference between muzzleloading rifle hunting of any kind and centerfire rifle hunting is the spirit of "1 shot followed by a substantial waiting period before the next shot."IMO an ML guy using an electronic ignition ML won't in high Hollywood fashion win any contests for dressing up like Daniel Boone, but he's a muzzleloader hunter as far as I am concerned. At least that's how I'd vote in the ballot box or the jury box.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lee B. wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

good point.....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Looks like more technology for the sake of technology. It would appear to be one more thing to go wrong and aggravate the pi** out of someone and be expensive to fix. Muzzleloaders have gotten to the point that it's like shooting a heavy bullet centerfire rifle. 200 yards is a long shot with one but it's possible (in the right hands). I think this shows that usable, reasonable muzzleloader technology has just about reached it's limits for now so let's put electronic gizmos in one to see if the public bites and will spend more money for something that adds very little to their guns.jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lee B. wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Muzzleloader has become nothing more now then an extention of rifle season with a slight hanycap.Personaly, as long as the ignition system is reliable, I'd go for it. It reduces loading/reloding time.The one worry I'd have is the safety of it and the acessability of the breach for cleaning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Spunjbrain wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Well, Mississippi changed their blackpowder season so that blackpowder cartridges such as the 45-70 and it's ilk are allowed if used in a rifle designed before 1895 such as a Hi-Wall or Sharps. So i guess they should develop TWO seasons. Blackpowder/Bow (Primitive) and Modern Muzzleloader. Primitive could be open sights traditional firearms/ any bow. Modern would basically be a single shot with no other restrictions.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Electronic Ignition.Amazing for certain, but I doubt it’ll sell by looking at the bells and whistles on the thing. However, the flint lock was in service for over 200-years, but was replaced in short order by the percussion cap.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nate wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I've never hunted with a black powder rifle before, but if I ever do I would assume the whole point in using one is the fact that it's not supposed to be a technologically advanced hunting instrument. The way I see it if you're going to use that type of a rifle then it's for reasons of nostalgia, and anyone who knows a little history knows that original black powder rifles did not have electronic ignitors. Now I do not think that it's a way of cheating, but come on now, why buy a black powder rifle with an electric ignitor, just go buy a more modern rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Peter C wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Wow...Tom Swift and his electric smokepole! Why not dispense with the battery altogether and use a piezo-electric ignition similar to those on cigarette lighters or outdoor grills? Seems to me that this new gizmo is an answer to a question nobody asked.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I guess it would be OK, but simpler is better. I wonder if it malfunctions does the gun have primer back-up ability?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JC Blauvelt wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Seems to me that the only difference now between a muzzleloader and a center fire rifle is that there is no brass casing. The modern ML's are just single shot rifles firing hand loads. To hunt with a ML is a one shot challenge. That is still a sporting way to hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Duane wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I feel that the inclusion of this new ignition system goes against the spirit of what blackpowder hunting is. I have no problem seeing this type of new rifle in the field, but not in the exclusive "primitive firearm" hunting seasons that many states have. At least in-lines rely on a shotgun primer as a cap. This new ignition system is definately not "primitive" in ANY sense of the word.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from KJ wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I don't care for the idea of electronic ignition in a firearm for the same reason I don't like any of the various "red dot" scopes, and don't rely on electronic range finders: I've never had a battery (car, flashlight, cell phone, et. al) fail at a convenient time. My favorite hunting rifle is my M70 featherweight, .30-06, and its dead-reliable trigger.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jay wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I am a great admirer of mankinds creativity. I really am. I have a great deer stand. Now if I could just acquire a BMG.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Paul Botha wrote 5 years 23 weeks ago

Hi, its me agin from South Africa, and I did go and buy the Electra.All I can say is WOW. This rifle has relkindled my interest in hunting and shooting just be cause it is so different yet so simple.Quite a few down this neck of the woods have bought these rifles, and everything, (including our largest antelope, the Eland, which is huge) that they shoot seems to just fall down right there. some even seem confident of shooting a Cape buffalo with this .50! I'm waiting for our hunting season (not legal, just the way it's done, better for drying meat and all) from May to August.On the range, a beauty. It shoots 300 grain Hornady .44 XTPs with sabots, really nicely even beyond 150 yards. It groups around 2 inches with most bullet weights, with properly matched charges at 100 meters/110 yards. I have seen a friend shoot just under an inch at 100 meters with one.We use a South African BP substitute called Sannadex (read up on whitesmoke.co.za). It also really likes those Pyrodex pellets the US guys are so lucky to be able to get. I use a moden telescopic sight, because anything to help proper placement of a bullet is ethical hunting, more so for those whose eyes are not so keen.And, the only incidents thus far are people who forget to scrub the face of the "sparkplug" clean now and then, requiring a dismantle.All the concern about safety is really just uncalled for. Im sure (and can now see) that no company in modern, litigation-happy USA would release an unsafe rifle. Much safer that carrying a bunch of primers in your pocket...Shoot an Electa, you know you want to...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dogboy wrote 5 years 26 weeks ago

Have been looking for information on the Electra and ran across this page. I'm firmly in the boat with the guy from the southern tip of Africa. I live in a state (MD) where you can hunt archery, muzzleloader (including the Electra), and shotgun. No rifle. Nada. Ever. But they even say a muzzleloader is considered unloaded for transport if the battery is removed. So it is apparent that they know and approve of the Electra and/or the Etronix.With all that being said, I'm all for an easier way to get longer range within what the state allows. And for me, after shooting my first deer, it is all about getting meat, nothing more. Heck, I'd use a remote airborne platform with infrared detection, laser targeting, and guided projectiles if the gov't and my finances would allow. Nothing could be better than walking out in the field and picking up my freshly killed package of meat and taking it home to process. I used to have grand visions of the perfect shot on the magnificent buck, but like I said, after the first perfect shot on a deer, I just want more meat. I'm surprised by all the weeping and gnashing of teeth regarding muzzleloaders and primitive weapons. I guess I'm just not a good hunter.So, anyone got any good concrete information on the reliability of the circuitry?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BossHoss888 wrote 5 years 29 weeks ago

I will be buying the CVA Electra. As far as worrying about circuitry failing and the gun being junk, it comes with a lifetime warranty, so I will get it fixed if it were to ever happen. I tried to look up any news of accidents or injury from the CVA Electra and found none. I am sure the manufacturer made sure that the weapon was a safe firearm as all manufacturers do, before releasing it to todays "sue happy" public. As far as the technological advances in the sport are concerned, I am all for anything making an outing more accurate. Some hunters have earned a bad name using not so accurate weapons leaving animals injured and not following up to retrieve them. And to you whiny guys crying because of advancing technology.......I guess you will have to call whoever it is you call with your "crank phone" to write your replies here on the internet for you, because I am sure you did not use advancing technology to write your negative comments about advancing technology. By the way, I am sorry if I offended any of you by asking you to use your crank phone. I will send a formal apology in a smoke signal. Nostalgia is a wonderful thing, but so is advancing technology. Why not stop fighting one or the other and celebrate both?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lone Star 45 wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

CVA's New Electronic Ignition System???First: how many times have you had electronics failSecond: The colder it gets, the less reliable are batteries especially 9 voltThird: Possible of accidental discharge when loading!Fourth: If you have a charge in the barrel, it’s considered loaded even in transport and against the law in most states and defiantly unsafe!Fifth: It’s illegal in my State!GAME OVER!CASE CLOSED!NICE TRY CITY BOYS!I’ll stick to my Encore Thank You!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

...with iron sights.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

Believe it or not my piece of crap kit gun (I'm no artist and there must be some secret to bluing) outshoots all my in-lines... patched round balls and a two inch group from 100 yards.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

Dick Lewis,You make some good points. However, because of the way the barrels were made a truly primitive flintlock would be somewhat dangerous to shoot regardless of cost. There are still plenty of artisans that build them just like the old time Pennsylvania gunsmiths did it. The only exception is the barrels are made of modern steel. They look the same but are much safer to shoot. I have owned 4 inlines but, keep going back to my Lancaster style longrifle 'cause it's much more fun. also a beauty to look at. Building them is considered an art form.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dick Lewis wrote 5 years 34 weeks ago

C'mon guys! It's not about the gun. It's about the hunting; and I mean the total experience, the preparation, the anticipation, the camaraderie. the smell of the woods, the excitement building. We've all had misfires, but that's part of the package. Makes a good story back at camp, and will be remembered just as long as the day you got the big one.Growing up in the fifties, when there were only three deer in Ohio, two of those in a zoo, and reading everything Jack O’Connor wrote, I learned that it wasn’t important what you carried into the woods, or how much meat you dragged out. The ultimate satisfaction was a humane one shot kill.Anything that adds to that likelihood is an improvement and should be lauded. As far as primitive weapons, there are still some around, but most of them are in a glass case and are too valuable to shoot.If you want to worry about something, worry about the lack of new hunters coming on to replace us when we’re being spoon-fed from a small jar.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Paul Botha wrote 5 years 35 weeks ago

Well, down here on the Southern tip of Africa, where we have to go through an expensive, annoying and time consuming (months/years) wait for a firearms licence and relicence every 10 years, the licence exemption for muzzleloaders makes the CVA Electra a winner. I wish CVA would punt them down this way, I was lucky to find one in a "progressive" gunshop.A muzzleloader is the only type of rifle I can buy and walk out with. (Of course I must still get a permit for the black powder or equivalent, but that thankfully only takes days).The muzzeloaders down this way do seem to favour percussion caps and side ignition guns, but there are advantages to the Electra and the fan base is growing: Lock time is reduced, rifle format looks like a modern centrefire, reducing the odd looks from landowners (we have almost no public hunting land, if any) who are wary of people hunting with smokepoles without telescope sights.I like the simplicity, the large caliber, and the fact that my not-so-hot eyes can be aided by a telescope sight. Anything that can assit the muzzeloading hunter to place his/her shots better is a good thing. Plus it shoots 400 grain conical groups of 1 MOA!If there is a "traditional season" (we have no such season and many outfitters in Africa won't let you near their land with a bow or a rifle with no sights, for obvious reasons) one can understand objections. As a weatherproof muzzleloader for general hunting it makes a lot of sense, especially on tough game.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mr. Sauers wrote 6 years 1 week ago

I'm all for this electric ignition system. Nothing is worse than fumbling with primers in the freezing cold while wearing gloves. If batteries are a concern, I fail to see why you couldn't keep a couple 9-volts in your pocket.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from James Hawk wrote 6 years 2 weeks ago

I have actually wondered why firearms in general haven't used such a piezo system. The idea of using impact sensitive chemicals seems more primitive to me. I think the idea would ultimately be more reliable as well as less corrosive. If s*** hit the fan and society broke down, I think I would rather have a piezo system than a stash of caps. Seems like finding a battery (and some systems are even batteryless) would be easier than trying to locate a source of percussion caps, primers, or their contents (lead azide, sodium perchlorate). Remember why the old mountain men preferred flintlock - for the same reason.So I am all for technological improvements on all firearms, BUT that doesn't mean that I agree these weapons should still be regarded as primitive per state hunting laws. I think the designation is arbitrary, but it should still stand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Looking at that circuit board and that capacitor, it’s a matter of time that recoil and environmental conditions will take it out $$$$$$$$$$!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Go with a flinter when the experience is more important than the kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Bubba,The fun is in tinkering with the lock. Once you get your flint adjusted just right. The lock time on a quality flinter will approach a caplock. A follow up shot is about as fast as any other ML. If we really need meat or in wet weather I switch to an inline or caplock. It is amazing to me that the old timers killed so many critters with flinters. If you get the chance to examine a well made long rifle by all means take a good look. My gun was made in 1993 by a fellow named Bingham from Ohio and it is worth the $1500 it cost back then. Sometimes I just pick it up, look at it and imagine what it would be like if that was the only guns available. It has a 39" Getz swamped barrel, engraved brass patchbox, carved curly maple full stock. Siler lock and Davis double set trigger. It is more accurate than I can hold and the balance is like a Purdey shotgun. No factory gun can compare.Clay, Thanks for the scope info.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

BubbaI’m one of those if it does suppose to work? WORK! I can see myself in a dear stand in the freezing cold reloading a flinter yet alone trying to keep the powder in the tray! LOL!PISSO IGNITION?WHATS NEXT!Here’s your sign!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Del in KSThank you, but no! I have enough difficulty with the cap lock, can't imagine "me" trying to deal with a flint lock! I'd be like one of Clay's "howling monkey's" trying to reload a flinter!If that's all you shoot, I admire you!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Pizzo lighters are nice to have, but pisso ignition?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

IMO a good ol' flinter is more fun to shoot than any cap lock (currently I have 3).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Bubba,You can crank up the difficulty factor by going to a flintlock longrifle. I carry a possibles bag with lead balls, patches,powder measure and 2 powder horns (1 of FFFg and primer horn). Couple yr ago shot a big doe 40 yd with 50cal rd ball. Broke both front legs with complete pass thru.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

What do I see hanging off to the lower left of the picture of the circuit board? A battery! AAAAAAA BAAATTEERRRYYYY!!!!! What happens when a battery gets cold? How many times you have picked up something and it doesn’t work and you just changed the batteries a few days ago? Sound familiar doesn’t it! Gee Mr. Wizard! I rather have a small hand full of 209 primers or no 11 than a pack full of batteries! Hold still Mr. Big Buck, my battery is dead! CVA, is that a special battery? How come you’re not using the Energizer! I know why! Thought you pass a fast one didn’t ya! Crack me UP!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Visitor wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Electronic short = KABOOM!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

By the wayI’ll be still shooting my Encore 50 cal Magnum 209, while you’re standing there looking stupid and all wet, GAME OVER!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Jeremiah (John) Johnson? One of my favorite movies! One thing about electronic switches, it’s not a question if it fails, it is when it fails! I’ve been around some of the most advanced avionics, military equipment and to include research and development that makes this stuff so primeval and its all hoopla! Electronic ignition? #209 primer works fantastic for me!Hell, batteries not needed! What happens if you get moisture in it! LMOA!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I guess I learned something. I have a traditional TC New Englander. It never occurred to me that I could hunt in a rainstorm. Really not much of a problem. Up here, ML season is in the first half of December and usually we have around one foot of snow.YooperJack

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

A friend and I hunted Prentice Cooper Wildlife Management Area for about eight hours one day in the 80's with side lock muzzle loaders in the pouring rain. We drove 120 miles we were going to hunt! Never been there and we were young and dumb so we stalked and walked almost continuously and at the end of the day my friend looked at me and said we were wasting our time these guns won't fire. I had loaded them both since he was a virgin with his gun and we unloaded them BANG BANG just like that. It even surprised me! We kept the hammer down on the cap all day which is a no no but RWS percussion caps and Goex black powder work rain or shine. Pointing your muzzle down at all times helps but to us that is an instinct..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

YoopHunting in rainy weather is hard with a real front stuffer, bordering on impossible! Keeping everything dry enough to ignite is the ultimate "exercise in futility"!Used to load my rifle in the house, cap the nipple, and wrap rifle with Saran Wrap, lower hammer gingerly, and go hunting!Boy, Clay will love this blog, running around with a half-cocked, capped muzzle loader!If you fired a shot, reloading was tough! One drop of water in the wrong place was/is a disaster!Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Hey Bubba that's great news! While I don't bowhunt, I do want more deer killed. There are a lot of folks in our age group who cannot bowhunt in a traditional manner. If this gets more of them in the woods, more power to them.YooperJackP.S. I can't think of any handicap that electric muzzleloaders would help.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bubba wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I suppose I'm a steer Clay, I've made many a mile with Rem No. 11 percussion cap in my pockets! LMAO!!!Electronic Muzzleloaders!?Wonder how Jeremiah (John) Johnson would have fared with an electronic muzzleloader!?Would I shoot one? At a range, yes, just for the kicks and giggles of saying I had shot one!Would I hunt with one? I don't think so Scooter! I still carry a "possibles bag"! I don't carry speed loaders, I carry a powder horn, powder measure and fffG black powder!If it must be loaded with powder and projectile "through" the muzzle, it's a muzzle loader. Muzzle loader has nothing to do with ignition system!BubbaP.S. Clay, come on - "howler monkeys"? LOL!!BTW - I'll be x-bow hunting this fall!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

DavidIf using a shotgun the next step in the evolution of the muzzleloader, you haven’t checked out the newest line of sabot slugs for shotguns!Two weekends ago I test fire my new Remington Model 11-87™ Sportsman® ShurShot™ Synthetic Turkey. I dropped a modified choke in and it shot slugs like a rifle. 75 yards and stacked them! Check it out David, time to retool, like I did

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Big John TCarrying a primer in the pocket is how dangerous and explain to me how Sir

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

Electrifying Muzzleloaders: CVA's New Electronic Ignition System?Not legal in Arkansas, GAME OVER!I do not trust electronic switches! Electronic switches on a muzzle loader, give me a break! I wonder where those howler monkeys that are hell bent to keep crossbows out of the woods on this one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Danny wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

I like Shot guns and Hand guns!!!!!!!!!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Daniel wrote 6 years 4 weeks ago

What kind of gun did Daniel Boone use when he whet hunting

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from David wrote 6 years 16 weeks ago

In Ohio we can't use center fire rifles.Shotgun slugs are a poor substitute. I have used my inline muzzleloader during gun season and muzzleloading season. This gun is the next step in the evolution of the muzzleloader. If tradition is so important why not press for a special spear and club season?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave in St Pete wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

Can't use them in Florida during muzzle loader season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big John T wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

I own and hunt with the Electra and it's no more modern than any other inline except you don't have to carry dangerous primers around in your pocket while you hunt. It's a breeze to clean and sweet to shoot. I've done work for ammo manufacturers and know how dangerous a primer is loose in your pocket it can make you a steer...CVA has a winner here...BJT

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from outdoormore wrote 6 years 27 weeks ago

What next? Laser beams?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kirk of GA. wrote 6 years 29 weeks ago

I think I'll try an Electra. Sounds like a great gun.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ed wrote 6 years 40 weeks ago

The folks that say that there is no place for a gun like this I feel aren't thinking things through. I mean, if my Native fore fathers had the compound bow with muzzy broadheads and carbon arrows I know they would have used them. Just like when they were first introduced to the firearm. They stepped up to using them. People that say that improving the muzzleloader by adding an electronic device is rediculous, they are just wrong in my book. People said the same thing about the in lines that use 209 caps, but now they are okay to most and the ones that own them love them. How many people that think this is silly have cell phones? Advancing is a way of life. I feel everyone should take the time to go to the CVA site and watch the video about the Electra. This looks like an awesome gun. I am also considering the game in a way.... With this electric ignition you get a full powder burn which is going to give you a harder hitting bullet which will usually result in a faster kill. It will also help with accuracy because there isn't a delay when you pull the trigger so this in turn will make the shooter more accurate. There are a lot of good things about this rifle and I for one have mine on order!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Warren wrote 6 years 40 weeks ago

As a techno guy I don't have any problem with it. I'm not into traditionalism for its own sake. I just want to hunt some game. Looks like it improves load times and ballistics. OK, so where can I get one? Every dealer is sold out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jason wrote 7 years 3 weeks ago

it is easy to understand why some people feel this weapon does not belong in the primitive season, but its harder to understand how the ver same people can gladly accepts mossy oak polymer stocks, inline designs, shotgun primers, sabots, high power scopes and non-blackpowder preshaped pellets for propellant. either the primitive season should be primitive and we'd all be hunting with kentucky rifles and bp that we created using nitrates collected from our own urine, or lets just call it muzzleloader season and let anything that is loaded from the muzzle pass.the bottom of the line is that this is a technology breakthrough as huge as the transition from flint to percussion and the sad thing is many hunters do not seem to realise this. it will hardly allow you to bag bigger bucks, but it will create a rifle that goes bang no matter what weather, that will take a fraction of the time to clean, and with a trigger-pull so crisp that it would have costed $500 by itself with conventional technology.the principle is correct. if cva has engineered it right, this is the beginning of the end for percussion primes. amen.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 4 weeks ago

People using the analogy of traditional bows vs compounds is flawed.Though a compound bow is easier to learn and shoot, at the end of the day it has the about same effective range as a traditional bow.Inlines have a much longer effective range than traditional guns.Basicaly the "traditional" aspect of the season was lost when inlines were allowed. This gun is just one more step in the evolution of todays muzzloading guns. Don't like it, but looks like muzzloading technology willcontinue to"improve". (Remember, companies want to sell more rifles than then their competitors)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FLETCH wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

Idaho just outlawed in line ML during the primitive season. What will make or break the CVA is the how many states will call the electronic ignition primitive and allow them. I have mixed emotions about in lines as a primitive, but use one because it will allow me to harvest a deer with less chance of wounding. I do feel that using a single shot make me safer and I use more caution because I have only the one shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoder wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

As a deer hunter in Indiana where the rifle is not an option due to laws, I welcome anything that makes the muzzle loader a better hunting tool.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

I agree. A narrow special interest group stole a chunk of the season from the general population of hunters by creating an arbitrary restriction on methods of take. And now that others are taking up the same hobby with MLs (albeit in-lines), they're gnashing their teeth because privileged access is being eroded. Cry me a river, babies.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from G-Man wrote 7 years 12 weeks ago

The muzzleloading deer seasons in most states came to be because of the efforts of buckskinners and traditional muzzleloading rifle shooters. They spent their time and money to lobby the lawmakers to give them a season away from MODERN guns and MODERN hunters.If you like modern guns then feel free to use them in the modern gun season and stay out of the woods during muzzleloading season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

i think you guys look too deep into the matter, all muzzle loaders are the same..give er take a few advancements here or there. They all use bullet, some sort of powder, and regardless of wut kind of muzzle loader you, you till have to put in the time and effort and do a little thing called hunting. It dont matter if ur shooting a machine gun, if you cant find the animals...its a no go, regardless of gun.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

@John -Hey I think that's great. Look, we'd *all* love to have fewer people on the landscape who take shots at targets beyond their ability, shoot at stuff they can't see, and so forth. But I have some fairly old classic hunting books from the 19thC that suggest that taking bad shots was quite common during the days of muzzleloading blackpowder rifles. And I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that the full range of yahoo behavior is found among "traditional" muzzleloader hunters as among any other hunters.We'd all like to hunt surrounded by fewer Yahoos. But you're not going to get there by limiting the technology. You're only going to get there by changing attitudes about practicing with your firearm, and taking clean shots at your prey.I (last month) bought a Savage 10ML-II for a variety of reasons including desire to get into ML hunting, safety (of rifle and propellant), and price reduction (in that order).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gunner Benavente wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

All this fancy gadjetry for muzzleloading? I always thought you were supposed to pour the powder down the barrel, push a rag and ball down on top of it, then put a cap on or pour powder into the flashpan. I think THAT is what 'muzzleloaders' are supposed to be doing.Gunner

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Thanks for making my point Mike. Should a scoped inline mean that hunters can abandon the accepted hunting and shooting skills? Certainly not. Unfortunately to some, it does. Just a few weeks ago I sat in my treestand and watched as a guy crashed through a tree line, kicked up a doe, and by the time he got his balance, leveled his scoped inline and took his shot, it was at a target at least 120-130 yds away and running away. Thank God he missed. But I'll bet somebody convinced him his inline with all the gadgets and tricks could do anything. Incidently, this guy even tried to reload quick to get a second shot, but the bullet fell off the end of his barrel from the speed loader and he had to dig for it in the alfalfa. Do I want less competition in the field during primitive season? Yes, this kind of competition. And, by the way, I do carry my powder in a horn, especially when using my flintlock, I don't even own a quad, let alone use one for hunting and while I do drive to where I hunt, it's still a good 1/3 to 1/2 mile hike in to where I hunt. I wear synthetic in the form of hunter orange because the law dictates. If you know of a source of hunter orange buck skins let me know. I do indulge myself 2 modern conveniences, binoculars because I want to see the distance, and a plastic sheet to drag a deer out, because at 54 it makes it a little easier. Am I a snob about this? You bet. Maybe the answer is 2 muzzle loader seasons, one unlimited and the other a true "traditional". Please understand my disdain of the "gadget" mentality is born from listening to hunters at the gun store who truely think that this new gimmick or that will allow them to take that 150 yd shot at a running deer and will be guaranteed an instant kill that will drop on a dime. Am I exaggerating? Ya, a little, but not much. In Ohio, we're now allowed only 3 rounds in the gun during modern firearms season. When this law took affect, the moaning was deafening because all hunters know that firepower is an acceptable substitute for marksmanship. I hear the same thought process when it comes to high tech muzzle loaders. These things will shoot flat out to 300 yds., won't they? Mike, I gather from your remarks your hunting ethics place a high priority on marksmanship, knowing your range limitations, and doing everything possible to insure a clean, swift kill. I applaud and respect that. Unfortunately, there are far too few of you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

"But the "traditionalist" view is simple, please give us a season that is traditional, that "primitive" means more than just muzzle loaded. Keep that one, short season we enjoy limited to side locks, open sights, and powder that really is powder."No I don't think I "missed the point." I think I get the point and I disagree with the agenda. Why should a special season be carved out for people who hunt with "not just a muzzleloader, but a particular KIND of muzzleloader!"Since the claim seems to be "It's the gun that matters" for tradition, rather than all the other equippage, let's consider the guns' performance.Does an in-line of necessity mean that a hunter using one can abandon the hunting skills required to stalk up on an animal? Nope.Does a scoped in-line mean that you can abandon such skills and try to shoot your animal at substantially greater distances? Nope. Indeed, a person trying it would be worse off than a typical unscoped ML hunter and worse off than a typical repeater hunter, because based on what I see 99% of us -- me included -- aren't Delta Force Snipers. It is still the case that most animals are taken at 100 yards or less range, regardless of the action or the way you put the charge and bullet in your gun or set it off.Was I to take a very authentic replica of a Civil War period sniper rifle would it meet the standards of "traditionalists?" Yes. If I were as good a shot as the rifle might permit me to be, would it shoot more accurately at greater distances than most off-the-shelf repeaters? Yes.The point of "traditionlists" is one that I grok. They want a special season all to themselves in which access and therefore competition from other hunters is limited. The claim is about "primitive technology" but the dedication to "primitive" is apparently so shallow that it goes no further than the firing mechanism on the rifle.Were it really about tradition you'd carry your powder in a horn not use any electronic equipment, not use a quad, not drive to your hunt site in a vehicle, nor wear anything made out of synthetic materials. Your tent would be made of canvas. Your sleeping bag made of cotton fabric filled with goose-down. Your lantern, if you had one, would flicker and go out in a stiff breeze.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SW Michigan Hunter wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

No, it doesn't carry the whole primative concept. It is more efficient. I don't hunt archery because of the high rate of wounded animals. If I can get a cleaner kill, I'll put my shotgun, rifle, antique bang stick away and try this out!!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Mike Diehl and others miss the point of the "traditionalist" view. I'm not a total traditionalist, I have a whole rack full of pump shotguns, semiauto .22's, .223 highpowers, even a "liberal" machine gun in the form of a .30 Carbine. I agree that this is probably a really cool developement. The industry has to keep coming up with something new or hunters will get bored. It's the best way for the industry to prompt new sales, some new gizmo that everybody's gotta have. I also agree it's got it's place in the greater scheme of things, along with scopes, powder pellets, sobots, etc. I have a lot of respect for someone who limits themselves to one shot hunting, it shows a lot of discipline in a world of machine gun mentality. But the "traditionalist" view is simple, please give us a season that is traditional, that "primitive" means more than just muzzle loaded. Keep that one, short season we enjoy limited to side locks, open sights, and powder that really is powder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Roger E. Reeves, Sr. wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

With teh un-successful sale of Remington's gun, why would anyone want a electronic B/P gun. For me, the 209 primer is enough. I would not trust a battery for a shot at a trphy W-tail. To me its a waste of money.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bg wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Why are people discussing this in relation to hunting seasons?What does this gun have to do with hunting seasons?Not all guns are used to hunt with, so I don't see why that particular line of thought is relevant to this.I also don't know if everyone that has a muzzleloader does so because they wanted a primitive weapon. I have one because it was on clearance for $40 and it is a .50 caliber. I like big calibers and at that price, I didn't even have to ask my wife if I could buy it!Anyway, people should be allowed to have whatever gun they want I suppose. But, if I was the head of product development at CVA, I would have passed on this idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bg wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Electronic ignition in a blackpowder muzzleloader seems pointless to me. But, I think that guns in the future could go that route (not paired with muzzleloaders though).I saw a post up there somewhere about bows (any) being primitive. Why do people think that modern compound bows are the same as a longbow or a recurve? To me, they are just as advanced as the modern in-line is to a flintlock.By the way, just got my first deer over the weekend with my muzzleloader. It was by far one of the best hunts of my life. Missed a deer in the morning...no second shot. Shot a deer that afternoon and it didn't kill it (bad shot). When I went to finish it off, the pyrodex didn't ignite. Finally got the deer but it wasn't an easy time of things.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SteveC wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

Technology is about money - even in hunting.It also allows those who lack most skills to think they're hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

@Dave King and other Defenders Of Tradition.Just curious -- do you all use any of the following when you hunt? A GPS, a digital or electronic analog watch, a radio, clothing or shoes made of synthetic fiber, an illumination device powered by anything other than tallow, paraffin, or whale oil, or any kind of vehicle with an internal combustion engine?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave King wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

this is getting ridiculous. First the inline ML's now Electronics?If this is what you want to Shoot fine but hunt in the proper season MODERN FIREARMS ! We should insist that our states natural resourses dept. return to the primitive firearms statutes rather than ML. inlines are nothing more than a new twist on the modern rifle and Electronics have NO place in the muzzle loader world

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jason wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I really dont see what all the fuss is over. A dealer friend of mine went to a pre SHOT show event at Ellett Brothers distributors in South Carolina last week. The folks from CVA were there with the new electronic ignition muzzleloader. It is called the Electra. Apparently it was the hit of the show. My friend said that the CVA booth was packed to the gills, and there was a lengthy wait just to see the gun up close. Meanwhile, the folks at the competitors booths were literally all alone. As far as the durability of the new system, CVA apparently did extensive testing in very harsh conditions. The CVA rep advised that they took one of the pre-production guns to a remote area in Canada accessable only by float plane, and known only to CVA. They loaded the gun, and placed a small piece of tape over the muzzle to keep moisture out. They left it there for about 25 days and went back to the location. The gun had been exposed to numerous snow/thaw cycles, and did not hesitate to fire the instant the trigger was pulled. They also conducted a similar test where the gun was left in a very swampy area in one of the southern states for about the same length of time, and the result was the same. My friend said that it appears to be a very well made and thought out product, and accurate to boot, as all of the dealers were allowed to shoot the guns at an indoor range. As for primative weapons, who gives a darn as long as people are in the woods hunting and enjoying the outdoors. I for one dont have any desire to run around and play Daniel Boone with a flintlock. I bowhunt, and that quenches my thirst as far as primative weapons go. I may be completely wrong, but I believe that this will be the next big innovation in muzzleloading. Within 2-3 years I bet every manufacturer will offer at least one model with some form of electronic ignition. It is simply much faster not to have to fool with a cap or shotshell primer. Just ram the pellets and sabot home, and pull the trigger. I for one hope that we will continue to see such innovation from the firearms industry, because the day that we dont will be a dark day for all of us who love guns and shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I have an easier solution. Eliminate blackpowder seasons. Anyone who wants to hunt with an ML or a black powder or whatever can do so, but let's not hear any more whining about how this is all about tradition. It's only about paring away a corner of the season for the special olympics version of hunting.To the traditionalist imperialists I have this to say. If you are not hunting with a match-lock arquebus, while wearing hose and a whale bone corset, you're not a "traditionalist." You might as well go to the store and buy your venison as agitate for your local G&F department to fall into a regulatory squabble of rules designed to rain on someone else's parade.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

The solution to undercutting all this modern technology is simple. I don't care if it's a traditional blackpowder rifle or a modern inline rifle with electronic powder ignition if you make all muzzleloaders open sights only you really cut down on the benefits of modern technology. Most people can only shoot to 75-100 yards with open sights. It would make ALL muzzleloaders much more of the short range firearms that the primitive weapons season are supposed to be about.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bill Martin wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

This is missing the whole intention of having a separate season for muzzleloaders. The purpose was to attempt to bag a deer using PRIMATIVE weapons. Today's in-line muzzleloaders and now this electronic ignition idea is nowhere in keeping with the initial intention of having the separate season. Pre-measured powder, modern bullets with sabots, modern shotgun primers and now electronic ignition? What next...... heat seeking bullets. There needs to be closer regulation of the weapons allowed during this season. If you want modern weapons, then hunt during the modern weapon season. If you want the thrill of meeting the challange of taking a deer using a side lock rifle of either caplock or flint lock ignition then you should hunt the muzzleloader season as it was meant to be hunted.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

"All of the reverse momentum will be transfered into automatic injection of the next following round down the muzzel of course (need to keep the sprit) for quick follow up shots"Sounds like you got a "comprehensive plan for victory" there, Saco. ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from william anderson wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

traditional? not!! the people who use an electronic ignition system on their muzzleloader are the same who, probaly, support deer darting competions. this is ridulous!! why even have a " traditional" season, if one is allowed to use this kind of modern technology?? in my opinion, this is going to far.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Taylor wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I spend several months a year hunting the woods of southern Ohio.Though Bow hunting is my first passion,The primitive season is my second love. The true idea of muzzleloader seasons are that they are designed to be challenging.By adding electronic ignition we are just taking one more step away from the traditional.I hope that alot of state divisions of wildlife will look at this weapon and exclude it as an acceptable muzzleloader for the primitive seasons.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

If it doesn't have a side hammer with a rock in it, it's not a REAL muzzleloader. End of argument!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I don't care one thing about it. In my opinion hunting guns with built in electronics just don't mix well. I'll bet you won't see the folks from the Custom Gunmakers Guild build one. It aint right.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

A lot of people have taken away from the meaning of the Black Powder hunt when they allowed the inline style of firearms. And NOW they are playing around with a electric firing mechanism for black power fire arms!! Just think, if it will only fire with or by a recognized finger print, In cold weather I prefur to keep my gloves on and just think about that battery, in cold weather it is going to drain it power a lot faster. Most people think that the Traditional black powder firearm is to much work, and are you going to remember to change your battery and carry spares with you just in case the one in the firearm drains and goes dead, sure. And I am the one still hunting when your electric mechanism fails you in the field.I prefur the old way, the traditional way, I will stick with my smooth bore flint lock and still fill my tag. I like my flint lock because I know it is dependable and I can rely on it to do it job in all type of weather. Modern tech. is great but not were it was set up for traditional style of shooting, Black Powder was set up for the traditionalist who shot the OPEN HAMMER style of black powder firearms and it should return to that, If you hunt with inlines and electric fireing pin fire arms they call black powder guns, they should be only aloud to be used in the modern fire arm hunts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scott wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I love my PA Pellet and would go as far to say that this little number is pushing it as far as being "traditional", especially after reading John's comment. I do agree John. I shoot sabots,pellets and even have fiber optic sights. I can go all out Traditional with this gun if I so wish except for the breech plug that is removable. I like the idea of cleaning this hot number with NO worry when the job is finished. I've heard too many horror stories of the old traditional's meeting thier maker becuase of improper cleaning. I shoot the hell out of mine and she still bellows, smokes,kicks,and smells great! I can't get enough and thats why I named her "Annie." Oh, I almost forgot. Someone out there is gonna buy into the "electronic ignition",It isnt gonna be me!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Call me a stick-in-the-mud, I prefer "traditionalist", but this is absurd. The whole idea for the original "primitive" season was to allow hunters willing to exert a little extra effort the opportunity for an additional firearms hunt. It was bad enough with the advent of centerfires, pre-measured pellets, speed loaders, saboted bullets, scope mounts. Then came shotgun primer systems, plastic and fiberglas stocks, high pressure, "magnum" capable barrels. Now this. Please tell me what's "tradition" or "primitive" about this. They fit just fine for use during a normal gun season, but are totally out of place for the "primitive" season. Hell, why not mount the damn thing on a motorized tripod, replace the scope with a camera, and hook it up to your laptop with target identification software. Then the "hunter" can sit back in his treestand and sleep, or just stay home. After all, with the camera, he can check once in a while to see if he's gotten "his" deer yet, then hire somebody to go out and field dress it for him.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chuck M wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Not to diminish the accomplishments of all the "modern" muzzloaders out there.....but one state for sure - Pennsylvania - has a muzzleloading season after Christmas that requires the use of flintlock rifles with open iron sights, that is no scopes or optics. Bucks may still be harvested provided the hunter has not taken a buck during archery or regular firearms season. It is one of the best times of the year to hunt here in PA......and I cherish the opportunity even with the rain, wind and snow. This approach can make both sides happy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Capt Walt wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

High Voltage Ignition System. Yea why knot.Lets beef up the idea a tad by getting rid of that diry old Black Powder and replacing it with Butane or Map Gas or Gasoline kicked up a notch with a little liquid Oxygen sprayed into the breach by a computer controlled fuel ingector nozzel.Then dispense of those old lead bulletts and patches by replacing them with thermoformed hyperdense non metallic projectiles with "Smart" expanding cores that mushroom only after penetrating a target with specific density algorithums.No more Walnut Stocks. Nah! that wont do. It will have to be Aramyid Carbon Fibers with automatic infered, ultrasonic rangefinders.Recoil? Whats that.All of the reverse momentum will be transfered into automatic injection of the next following round down the muzzel of course (need to keep the sprit) for quick follow up shots; say 15,000 rouns a min? Wait now the design calls for liquid nitrogen cooling of the barrel.Then again? Maybe a Flintlock aint such a bad idea??NEWENGLANDCHARTERS@maine.rr.comhttp://home.maine.rr.com/newengland/

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Don't like it ... nothing like a "squeeze-click-boom."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Micah Steele wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

All of the black powders being produced today are a far cry from the traditional. As long as you still have to put the powder and the bullet down through the muzzle with a ramrod I don't see the issue. I am sure that this ignition system will still have it's issues. Some poor hunter will still have the sights on "the big one" only to have the powder fail to ignite for some reason or another just like always. An just like always, he'll only get one shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

My only reservation to the electronic ignition would be the reliability of ignition, durability of the system towards water/physical abuse and the ability to clean the rifle without harming myself or the ignition system. If you want to hunt like Davey Crockett then buy a Davey Crockett reproduction flintlock and go for it... if you want to hunt and your state will allow, inline ignition, riflescopes, smokeless powder, and/or electronic ignition then hunt with whatever the law will allows. We get our panties wrapped around the axel too tightly sometimes regards what other folks want to do...this type of ignition system is not going to put more game in front of your sights than any other type of system...buy what you want and the law allows then go hunt and stop worrying about what other people are hunting with...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Thomas Hall wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

In his book Tracker, Tom Brown describes how he killed a deer by dropping onto it from a tree and cutting it's throat. If we make that the baseline technique for hunting a deer then I think the question becomes "what level of technology beyond that do you prefer?".Personally my heart belongs to yesterday but my head belongs to tomorrow.My head wants to know if I Can have one of these that averages the wander of the barrel so that when I pull the trigger it always fires at just the right instant? And can I set it to recognize my fingerprint so no one else can fire my gun?My heart wonders if it will add firearms to the list of things that become obsolete in a few months and thrown away in a few years? And will they make ones that talk? "we're sorry, your shot did not go through, please hang up and try your shot again."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ray wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

oh yeah! Just hook it up to a game camera and stay in bed on them cold mornings. Git yer picture and game at the same time, just what we need if they would only legalize it fer trespassers..:-)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ed J wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Now here's a solution in search of a problem

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Archerwvu wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

My gut tells me that this is not going to excite too many folks nor is it going to make hunters run like wildcats to the nearest dealer to obtain one. I can't object to the idea considering I hunt with a compound bow rather than a recurve. Technology shall know no boundaries.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MattWV wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

If people want to use it fine but keep in mind that it's from CVA whose track record isn't exactly sterling; I'm interested to see what kind of bugs pop up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

From a business stand point they might be onto somthing. Each hunter has to decide where their ethics lay.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Of course, would I want a gizmoe'd circuit board igniting my shots? No. But that too is a matter of taste. Someone wants to push the technology envelope it is OK by me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

It's a matter of taste. The only difference between muzzleloading rifle hunting of any kind and centerfire rifle hunting is the spirit of "1 shot followed by a substantial waiting period before the next shot."IMO an ML guy using an electronic ignition ML won't in high Hollywood fashion win any contests for dressing up like Daniel Boone, but he's a muzzleloader hunter as far as I am concerned. At least that's how I'd vote in the ballot box or the jury box.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lee B. wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

good point.....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jstreet wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Looks like more technology for the sake of technology. It would appear to be one more thing to go wrong and aggravate the pi** out of someone and be expensive to fix. Muzzleloaders have gotten to the point that it's like shooting a heavy bullet centerfire rifle. 200 yards is a long shot with one but it's possible (in the right hands). I think this shows that usable, reasonable muzzleloader technology has just about reached it's limits for now so let's put electronic gizmos in one to see if the public bites and will spend more money for something that adds very little to their guns.jim

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lee B. wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Muzzleloader has become nothing more now then an extention of rifle season with a slight hanycap.Personaly, as long as the ignition system is reliable, I'd go for it. It reduces loading/reloding time.The one worry I'd have is the safety of it and the acessability of the breach for cleaning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Spunjbrain wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Well, Mississippi changed their blackpowder season so that blackpowder cartridges such as the 45-70 and it's ilk are allowed if used in a rifle designed before 1895 such as a Hi-Wall or Sharps. So i guess they should develop TWO seasons. Blackpowder/Bow (Primitive) and Modern Muzzleloader. Primitive could be open sights traditional firearms/ any bow. Modern would basically be a single shot with no other restrictions.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Electronic Ignition.Amazing for certain, but I doubt it’ll sell by looking at the bells and whistles on the thing. However, the flint lock was in service for over 200-years, but was replaced in short order by the percussion cap.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nate wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I've never hunted with a black powder rifle before, but if I ever do I would assume the whole point in using one is the fact that it's not supposed to be a technologically advanced hunting instrument. The way I see it if you're going to use that type of a rifle then it's for reasons of nostalgia, and anyone who knows a little history knows that original black powder rifles did not have electronic ignitors. Now I do not think that it's a way of cheating, but come on now, why buy a black powder rifle with an electric ignitor, just go buy a more modern rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Peter C wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Wow...Tom Swift and his electric smokepole! Why not dispense with the battery altogether and use a piezo-electric ignition similar to those on cigarette lighters or outdoor grills? Seems to me that this new gizmo is an answer to a question nobody asked.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I guess it would be OK, but simpler is better. I wonder if it malfunctions does the gun have primer back-up ability?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JC Blauvelt wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

Seems to me that the only difference now between a muzzleloader and a center fire rifle is that there is no brass casing. The modern ML's are just single shot rifles firing hand loads. To hunt with a ML is a one shot challenge. That is still a sporting way to hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Duane wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I feel that the inclusion of this new ignition system goes against the spirit of what blackpowder hunting is. I have no problem seeing this type of new rifle in the field, but not in the exclusive "primitive firearm" hunting seasons that many states have. At least in-lines rely on a shotgun primer as a cap. This new ignition system is definately not "primitive" in ANY sense of the word.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from KJ wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I don't care for the idea of electronic ignition in a firearm for the same reason I don't like any of the various "red dot" scopes, and don't rely on electronic range finders: I've never had a battery (car, flashlight, cell phone, et. al) fail at a convenient time. My favorite hunting rifle is my M70 featherweight, .30-06, and its dead-reliable trigger.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jay wrote 7 years 14 weeks ago

I am a great admirer of mankinds creativity. I really am. I have a great deer stand. Now if I could just acquire a BMG.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment