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A Few Kind Words About the .280 Remington

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August 02, 2006

A Few Kind Words About the .280 Remington

By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

And so, after hauling my old .280 out of the gun safe in order to write about it for the blog, I wondered why I ever retired it, seeing as how it is still such a good rifle. And one of the reasons it’s so effective is because of the .280 cartridge, which is vastly unappreciated.

In 1957, Remington wanted a round for its pumps and autos that would match .270 Winchester ballistics and turned to a wildcat called the 7mm/06, which was the .30/06 necked down to .284, or 7mm. But American cartridge designation requires that you never call something by its correct diameter, so Remington labeled the new round the .280.

It sold OK, but Remington wanted it to sell better, so in 1979 they redesignated it as the 7mm Express Remington, but when that failed to catch fire they went back to .280 after only a year.

Name games aside, the .280 is one of the top cartridges for North American hunting. It ranks right alongside the .30/06 in general usefulness. If you have one, you can take anything except the big bears, and do it handily. One of the two or three biggest elk I’ve ever seen--a true 1,000-pound monster--was killed dead in his tracks by one shot from a .280. You can think of it as a 7mm magnum but without the added powder, recoil, and muzzle blast.

Comparisons to the .270 are both inevitable and futile. In the real world, you could hunt with them from now until the crack of doom and see no difference. If there is an advantage, it lies with the .280, and it’s for handloaders only, because there are a lot more .284 bullets on the market than .270 bullets. Also, if you want to hunt something really big, like Alaska moose, you can use 175-grain bullets in the .280, while the top end for the .270 is 150 grains.

The .280 cartridge does just fine with 140-, 150-, and 160-grain bullets, and most factory loads these days seem to be the middle weight, which is just fine with me. If you’re a handloader, stick with slow powders such as Hodgdon 4831 and RelodeR 22. I’ve had very good luck with RelodeR 25 and IMR 7828 as well. Magnum primers work well with these propellants.

If you already own a .270, there’s no need to trade for a .280, but if you have a chance to buy one of the latter, there’s no better all-around big-game cartridge.

Comments (53)

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from MONTES_51 wrote 5 years 15 weeks ago

tengo un rifle remington mod. 70 cal 270 y un 30-06 walther aleman y me gustaria saber cual es mejor para la caza de venado cola blanca a una distancia promedio de 300 yardas

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from ishawooa wrote 5 years 20 weeks ago

We running down the .270 in one area and singing the praises of the .280 in another. I have had both for years and can assure you that they are ballistic twins if the .280 is loaded adequately. Nothing more or less. Neither is a 7 mag of any variety although some loads do come amazingly close with the lower weight bullets.

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from RKT wrote 5 years 20 weeks ago

Update - 8 pt 200 lb whitetail in upstate NY. 150 yd shot through both lungs and out the other side. Deer went a few feet and fell down, chest cavity liquid.BAR is in nursing home.

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from RKT wrote 5 years 23 weeks ago

I'd been wanting a rifle in 280 for a while after a guide I knew in Montana and a good friend who hunts in Maine had been singing praises for many years. I picked up a Sig SHR 970 in the caliber, worked up a load with 160 gr TBBC's and 54.3 gr Reloder 19, and brought it out to Montana this past week for mule deer and antelope.Absolutely devastating. I had a huge mulie collapse instantly with a double lung shot, and a 15" antelope go five feet with a shoulder shot.My 7 mm Rem mag BAR is facing retirement.

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from walt wrote 5 years 24 weeks ago

I have just read the pros and cons of the .280. back in 1985 Or 86 I purchased in Prineville Ore. A rem.model 700 in the light weight mountain gun . I had a 9 power variable scope mounted on it. That rifle has been with me on a hunt in az. for elk, too colorado for elk and mule deer, it has served me well in Oregon both deer and elk have fallen with one well placed shot, I dropped a nice bull moose with it in cranberry portage Manitoba canada, it has killed deer in Mo., and last Fall after my retiering to My home State of Michigan, I killed a 9 point white tail on opening day, and returned the 2nd day and killed a 6 pointer, all of my kills have been one shots. NO!! I am not Bragging, just stateing facts, the .280 in my book is one of the finestcalibers ever prodused. for a hunter who can only afford one gun, then the .280 cal. is it. No matter what leagl game you hunt in North america the .280 will do the job, and do it right

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from Ray wrote 5 years 24 weeks ago

I am new to this site but have enjoyed all of your comments. I grew up in northern idaho and owned a 7mm mag. but got tired of getting my teeth cracked evey time I shot it. I now live in Georgia and am hunting from tree stands instead of ridge tops. I have traded into a 280 AI and was not sure I was going to keep it. Thanks to you guys I am really exited about some range time and one on one with some Georgia deer and hogs.Thanks for saving me from trading it off.Ray Swanson

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from Visitor wrote 5 years 25 weeks ago

david,Trim-to Length is 2.530, overall length (with bullet) is 3.350.Go to Hodgdon.com or IMR.com.I would buy a reloading manual or two from Lyman, Speer, etc..280 is sweet.

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from david wrote 5 years 25 weeks ago

need reload inf. for 280 rem. also c.o.l. thanks

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from Dee Das wrote 5 years 28 weeks ago

When I was in college,about 22 years ago, I bought a used Ruger M77 (pre Mark II) in .280 Remington for $250. It came with a heavy barrel. The rifle itself is relatively heavy because of the weight of the barrel.When I fired it from the bench, I was shocked at the accuracy. The gun will put bullets in the same hole at 100 yards consistently. I have shot it with a number of different loadings, including my own handloads and it has always been a stellar performer.I have never been able to achieve the accuracy of this rifle/caliber combination with any other firearm that I have fired. There is also something to be said about the warm feeling I get when I look at a well figured walnut stock. This is one rifle that I will never part with.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 31 weeks ago

The .280 is a study in marketing trial & error. I could be wrong, but I remember the .280 as having been initially introduced in the Model 740 autoloader and the 760 pump, which was a good choice for whitetail deer but it would have made more sense to me to offer this excellent cartridge in a good bolt action like the Rem 721/725. That decision focused on those shooters who preferred the auotloader and slide action rifle to other options. Remington was certain it would sell on its own ballistic merits, and may have given the market more credit for objectivity and acumen than it deserved. The 740 & 760 were not bad choices, especially in the Northeast, but the bolt action is and was unquestionably more popular on both sides of the Mississippi. Compound this error with one of timing; the 7mm Remington Magnum was introduced in 1962, five years after the .280, and Remington's own advertising effort made the .280 pale by comparison. I continue to think the 7mm Mag is the better choice than the .264 Win Mag with which it was supposed to compete in the marketplace. As a hunting cartridge, the .280 Rem gives up nothing to the .270 Win. I'm sure I'll be accused of heresy, but (other than the spectrum of bullet selection) the .280 gives up nothing to the deservedly popular .30-'06 either. In my opinion, the .280 provides a more efficient combustion chamber than the 7mm Magnum.The 7mm Express Remington appellation was dropped because we live in a litigious society and the confusion between the 7mm Express and 7mm Rem Mag had proven problematic.Example: a gentleman a few benches away at the range was firing a 7mm Rem Mag, but experienced difficulties on extraction. On examination of the two ruptured cases that he ejected from his rifle, he'd been given 7mm Express ammo for his 7mm Mag by a relatively inexperienced salesman. Errors like this occurred with embarrassing frequency, so Remington reportedly went back to the .280 Rem designation to avoid being the "deep pocket" in a lawsuit.In summary, I think the .280 is a superbly versatile cartridge. I could say the same about others which (for whatever reason) don't get the attention and recognition they deserve, but the .280 is a fine choice.

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from MileHighShooter wrote 5 years 31 weeks ago

I just picked up a nice used Weatherby Fibermark in 280 rem myself. Its a caliber that's always fascinated me but I could never justify buying a new one, and outside of the new X-bolt, nothing really grabs my attention. However this gem of a rifle with a great caliber was a no brainer. This will be my ultimate back up for everything from coyotes to african plains game. It'll do anything, anywhere in a pinch

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from Ol' Roy wrote 5 years 32 weeks ago

Really got a kick out of the .280 comments! I have a Ruger 77 Mk II Stainless w/ laminated stock topped with a Leupold. I bought this rifle to hunt Colorado elk, but found that it will make relly quick work on Oklahoma whitetails. I have done a lot of handloading in the last 20+ years but this rifle didn't seem to like any of the boattails that I tried to put through it so I tried the Federal Vital Shock 160 gr. Trophy Bonded Bearclaw factory load and was I amazed at it's precision (3/4" five shot groups). My longest shot at game was about 250 yds. Dropped in his tracks. I am a huge fan of the .280!

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from Jim in Mo. wrote 5 years 38 weeks ago

johnny v,How did you find a blog this old? When I ckick on my 'feeds' button the oldest I get is 12/07.

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from johnny v wrote 5 years 38 weeks ago

The .280 is a great cartridge -not a lot of gun makers are offering it anymore. If I had a choice, all things being equal, I'd choose the .280 over the .270.But, there is a lot more ammunition available in the .270 and it's cheaper. Over time, I think the ammo situation will only get more one-sided in favor of the .270.

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from Mike Reeder wrote 5 years 39 weeks ago

If memory serves Remington originally loaded the .280 with a 125-gr. bullet. It was also woefully underloaded. Those two factors probably did more to retard the .280s popularity than anything else. The obvious comparison was to the 130-gr. bullet in the .270 which zipped along at higher velocity with better sectional density, while enjoying the advantage of a long head start. Another problem was that while the .270 was originally offered in the Winchester Model 70, the .280 first arrived in the Remington Model 721. The 721 was a strong, very accurate rifle but it was as ugly as a mud fence. I had a friend who bought a 721 in .280 and he loved it, but he was an exception. In terms of practical hunting I don't think anything you shot with either the .270 or .280 would be able to tell you the difference. Each has its minor advantages, but both are fine cartridges. O'Connor, incidentally, spoke very highly of the .280, and was touting the virtues of a 7mm cartridge based on the '06 long before Remington gave birth to the .280. He was also one of the first to lament its failure to catch on with the shooting public.

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from Larry wrote 5 years 39 weeks ago

stumble on this and wanted to add my 2 cents. I have been hunting for right at 30 years. All my fam used an 30-06 and/or 270 but in having access to ballistics charts I purchased my first .280 in a mountain rifle... I was extremely pleased, but during my divorce I lost the rifle. A few years later I saved some pennies in between the ham sammiches and purchased a Browning A bolt gold medallion with the boss system chambered in .280 and I must say that over the past 18 years between the two I have never lost any game; nor have I ever tracked any.. any further than 30-40 yards. I shoot the 165 grain in factory rounds and I still group at 200 yds avg around 1.00 inch.... simply the best rifle I have ever owned.

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from tom wrote 6 years 9 weeks ago

I got tired of grandads ought6 and tried got a new 280 and love it. 3 shots - 3 deer @ 150yds. Small hole on one side - baseball sized hole on the other. none of them moved more than 1o feet. I've shot alot of rifles and besides my 243win this is by far the most accurate.

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from TO wrote 6 years 10 weeks ago

I should add, the Mk II currently is set up for 139 Gr Hornady SST loads and shoots a 1 minute groupl. I don't know that this bullet is what I want for black bear.

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from TO wrote 6 years 10 weeks ago

I have a Ruger MK II in stainless in 280 Rem chambering. I am going to Prince of Wales, AK in search of black bear. I have been reading on this 175 gr bullet that couples nicely in the 280 casing. Is there a factory load that someone can recommend? If not, what about recommending a bullet and powder for a re-load. Thanks!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 11 weeks ago

DDCIf you are happy with it, who cares?It's a great rifle.

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from jimmy wrote 6 years 11 weeks ago

Thanks for the info, was planning on buying 280 Rem, but now I know I am. Looking at Ruger 7120,$570

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from Carl wrote 6 years 12 weeks ago

I hunt mostly dear and black bear and ocationly elk and I can choose what caliber I want to hunt with anything from 257rob. to 340wheatherby but when I really get serious about picking a true alaround caliber it is without question THE 280 it always does the job with room to spare. Thats how good it is.

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from DDC wrote 6 years 12 weeks ago

A week ago I went to a very large gun show with the mind set of getting a 30.06 rifle, just for the overall versitaly in the caliber. Needlesly to say 6 hours later I walked out with Remington 700 BDL Classic in .280 remington. I did a lot of research before I went and didn't see much on .280 (probably because most of my searches pertained to the 30.06) But after purchasing this gun and yet not having had the chance to shoot it yet, I am very very pleased with my purchase. Every day I have done more and more research on the .280 and happy I have this rifle now. Does anyone tned to agree or disagree with my purchase?

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from S.E.Hall wrote 6 years 13 weeks ago

I've just read what people have put on this site about yhe .280 Rem. I bought my model 700BDL .280 from a friend, and tried it against my Rem. model 700 .30-06, my grandson's .270 and a 7mm Rem Mag. It grouped closest of all. My grandson and his friend said I wasn't hitting the target, but the group (3 shots) could be covered by a nickle. They were in the bullseye at the nine o'clock position. After one target shooting session, I had two people want to buy the rifle. I told them that I would take $5,000 for it and they thought I wasn't serious. I can't forsee ever parting with it. It is factory with a 24" barrel and the others that I've seen all have 22" barrels. I reload for it as I do for most of my guns and it functions flawlessly with anything I feed it. I LOVE IT.

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from John Thurman wrote 6 years 16 weeks ago

i recently did some trading with a guy and picked up a 1 year (1994 i think) production remington mountain rifle in 280. the guy supplied about 50 rounds of preloaded 280 ammo, but i dont shoot other peoples reloads myelf ( saw a friend one time shoot a guys 7MM mag reloads during his preseason rifle check, the first 3 shot OK, but the 4th round was somehow way overloaded, and it split the action on his winchester model 70, the bolt came back and buried itself in his cheek...) so the first thing i did was pull the bullets and reload the bunch with varget powder and 139gr hornaday SP bullets and headed to the range. i setup at 200 yards and popped the exact center of the 10 ring with the first shot. i shot the second round and didnt see it on the paper...hmmmm....i shot the third round,same thing so i checked the scope and rifle over,nothing wrong, so i went down range to look at the target. the rifle had shot a perfect 1 hole group at 200 yards...ive always heard good things about accuracy with the 280 remington, but never expected this kind of precision out of it. recoil was very managable, and after about 30 rounds i didnt wake up with a sore shoulder the next day. id compare it recoilwise to a bit more heavy than a 243. i am completely sold on the remington 280. great round, and even though the 270 club hollers that theres not much differece in the two, id have to completely disagree with them. the remington 700ADL MTR is topped with a 4x16x40MM BSA scope, and is one hell of a shooter. im sure it will do quite nicely for whatever you want to hunt with it. ive even found loads online for this handly little rifle that some of those guys were using for headshooting rabbits and treerats

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from death by 280 wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

i have a 280 rem bdl its heavy but then i am a big boy if any one doubts the 280 drop some light mags in to yours and show up a few 7mm mags that will get there atintion btw i get sub 1\4 inch 5 shot groops at 100 yards with mine. with less than $150 work it is pillar bedded and the barell is floated whith a 2 1/2 pound trigger

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from Alex wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

I own a .270 (std. Howa 1500 bolt-action) AND a .280 (Remington 7600 pump action) why ? The 1st for ambushing red deers (from tree-stands) and the 2nd for driven hunts (mainly wildboars). I use the .270 with 150 grains bullets and the .280 with 165 grains bullets ... (my .243 is loaded with 95 grains bullets and works just fine on roe deers in a Howa Varmint). Here in Europe the .280 popular for only one reason : the 7500 & the 7600 from Remington ... Otherwise hunters prefer the original caliber aka the "BRENNEKE" 7X64 ... This caliber may seem "exotic" to you but its performances are a little bit over the "younger" .280The 7X64 is without a doubt the N°1 caliber over here even if it is several decades old ...I don't like it (sometimes too fast and too expensive in the most interesting bullets / factory ammo from RWS especially ...). But it's worth a try ... if you like Steyr-Mannlicher or Sauer rifles (I don't mention Blaser because I think their bolt action rifles are just too expensive and poorly designed "toys").;-)

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from O Garcia wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

The .280 Remington should have been a popular, commercially successful cartridge, except it was introduced by Remington, which has a bad history of killing otherwise good cartridges.Aside from their successes with .22 centerfires (even though the .222 Rem. and .222 Rem.Mag. are commercially dead, they at least were beaten by the .223 Rem.) and the 7MM Rem. Mag., Remington have had no great "hit" with cartridges bearing their name. Most are hanging on, but just hanging on.(OK, I'm going seriously OFF TOPIC here.)6MM - commercially dead. See Mr. Petzal's cartridge guide from July 2007 issue. Great cartridge that didn't sell well..25-06 - hanging on..280 - hanging on (most buyers will go for the .270). Great cartridge that has no visceral appeal.8MM Rem. Mag. - dead! Should have been the .340 Weatherby of Remington, but once again, Remington's conservative loading and poor marketing did the Big Eight in..350 Rem.Mag. - the .325 WSM of the 1960's. While the .325 WSM is now being hailed as the new "it" cartridge, the .350 is a pariah. Chambered only by Remington, and in a wonderful rifle (Model 7) that is for righties only. On a personal note, sad.The Ultra Mags - the .300,.338 and .375 Ultra Mags didn't really do any more than what the .300, .340 and .375 Weatherby's offered.The Short Action Ultra Mags (SAUMs) - suffered from a really long and awfully bad name. Remington should have dropped the "Ultra" on these shortfats. It's like the days of Art Mashburn's Super Magnums again. At least, Mashburn's were truly Super. They (SAUM's) were also completely "scooped" by the Winchester WSM's.Perhaps the best proof that the Ultra Mags, whether long or short, have failed to make a big mark? Remington advertises sniper rifles (in its military website) that are chambered for .338 Lapua. Wow! Remington can't even convince buyers that it's . 300 and .338 Ultra Mags are just as good.THANK GOD Remington didn't mess up the .416 Remington.

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from Bob Geary wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

RE: 280 Ackley Improved. Nosler now has brass available for 280 AI. I bought 50 rounds just to have some brass with the correct headstamp. Looks like Norma brass to me.

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from MidnightBanjo wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

Just looking over this blog and the thought happened to cross my mind that my wife wants to go deer hunting with me, but my 30-06 is "just too loud" and kicks like a mule(her words, not mine). Anyone out there have a recomendation for a good make/caliber that isn't "too loud" and won't "kick like a mule"? Thanks, and hope you all remembered to give thanks on thanksgiving!

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from rs wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

.280 is a great caliber especially here in Montana. Hoping to get an AI with savage action. Killed my first Elk with it at 330yds

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from mcnabb wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

The "reason" for the .280's greatness is found in the devastating power of that long 175 grain bullet in a standard length action. There's nothing else like it - it will slay dragons. To get the same coefficient from a 30-06 you'd have to use a 220 grain bullet and your choice is limited. Plus the load behind it would be a tremendous thumper if you wanted anything like the reach and trajectory of a .280. You'd basically be shooting the throat out of your 30-06, trying to get 300 magnum performance out of the smaller case. You can do it all with a .280, no sweat. For my money, it's the single greatest "sweet spot" in sporting rifle loadings.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

I wish I had bought my Weatherby LW Sporter in .280 Rem a few years back. Now that I have the .30-06, I probably won't get one. After all the hoopla about the Model 70 .270 Win from Cactus Jack, I decided to never own one just to be oppositional. the .280 would fit in between my .35 Whelen and .257 Roberts nicely. So would a 7x57 Mauser!

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from Lancer wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

I've got a Ruger 77 MKII Stainless,shoots realy well 3 shots into .75 inch with me shooting...got it for $400 used,with rings,without scope.I like the rifle,many have claimed the 77 has bad accuracy,have not seen any problems with mine.

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from mr.coon wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

when saving up for my first rifle i was firmly against having what everyone else had. so i scoured "best deer cartridges" articles and ballistic charts for months.the .280 came up in every conversation and was tops in most of the writers books. it was always describes as not well known and under appreciated, much like how i felt about my teenage self back then. it sounded like a match made in heaven... and boy was it ever.11 years, 50 deer, and several hogs later my .280 remington model 700 mountain rifle is still at my side... after seeing how my gun has performed over the years my father, brother in law, and 5 other friends set aside their .270s and now all shoot 280 mountain rifles.

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from bubba wrote 6 years 50 weeks ago

I just bought a Nosler 48 and if this is any indication of the work they do; I would buy one of their custom rifles in 280 Actley Imp. Too bad they don't make the 280 A.I. in their Md 48; their customs are a little too heavy for my taste (10#'s)

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from joey wrote 7 years 7 weeks ago

I am looking to buy a .280 cal. rifle. Any suggestions or advice on what make and model, and where is the best plaxe to look for one. thanks. Joey

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from Matt wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

I own the .280 M700 Mountain Rifle and it was purchased new in 1997 or 1998. This rifle has the non montecarlo stock with drop plate. I prefer it to the Detachable Box magazines that the new models come with. The magazine may be hard to leave at home but its not hard to forget in the truck. This rifle has been used predominately for NW Pennsylvania Whitetails and black bears. Its loaded with hornady 139 SSTs and 140 grain nosler partition bullets. Both loads are chronographed at well above 3000 fps. The performance on whitetails is unmatched by any other rifle of similar caliber that I own. Because the rifle is light its felt recoil is actually more than my 30-06 in M700 BDL. Despite the marginally more felt recoil the .280 is my choice. The half inch to three quarter inch 5 shot groups at 100 yards I have fired with this rifle make it more than accurate enough to take game animals consistantly at 400 yards. I shot the biggest buck of my life at 345 yards and the deer just collapsed. 175 pounds dressed. I honestly want to get another one of these rifles in synthetic just so that I dont feel bad doing serious hunting with his rifle that leads to wear and tear.

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from Visitor wrote 7 years 17 weeks ago

if you have a 7mm06 reload for it its great.280 is the same except they made the case .050 longer where you could not chamber a 280 in a 270 can use a 280 neck sizer die 3006 cases and have a shooter.

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from Adam wrote 7 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks Dumb*ss.I heard that the 7mm 06 turned into the .280 so I purchased a box and the round was too long so I returned them. I then contacted a gunsmith who lived a fair distance away and he said he would have to do a chamber cast on it. It sounded expensive so I didn't pursue it any further. I am just going to hang it on the wall above a shadow box anyway but it would be nice to have some ammo for it.

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from Dumb*ss wrote 7 years 20 weeks ago

To Adam: Based on your information, I believe you have something very close to a .280 Ackley Improved. And it is a wildcat, although Kenny Jarrett (custom gunsmith/gunmaker extraordinaire) has made up a gazillion of em. But you should have a qualified gunsmith check the rifle to make sure. If he's smart, he'll do a chamber cast and check dimensions to confirm it. I believe Jarrett can also provide brass and loaded ammo for it - if indeed it is a .280 Ack. Imp. Then, and only AFTER you've had the rifle checked and OK'd by a qualified gunsmith, you should be able to fire standard .280 Rem. ammo in it to fireform brass and then reload it yourself. Assuming you want to and are able. There is lots of reloading info and dies available for the round. And it's a great round, by the way. I have two of em and swear by em. If it isn't EXACTLY a .280 Ack. Imp., you can send fireformed brass to RCBS and they'll make a set of dies for you. Hope this helps and good luck.p.s. Have the gunsmith also tell you on what action this rifle is based, and he might even be able to tell you who rebarreled or rechambered it to 7mm-.06 Imp. Some of the old gunsmiths stanmped their names on their work.

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from Adam wrote 7 years 20 weeks ago

I have my Grandmothers rifle and it says 7mm 06 imp on the barrel, any idea what this round is now? Wildcat?

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from .280 fan wrote 7 years 31 weeks ago

I used to be a solid .30-06 fan until I started shooting a .280. I have hunted in Alaska with a .280 Remington rifle since 1984. This is one of the cartridges that kill well beyond their ballistics. I shoot nothing but 160 grain Nosler Partitions, and have never lost an animal when hit with one of these rounds. I have taken 5 blacktail deer, 9 caribou, 3 moose, 2 black bear, 1 grizzly bear, 1 wolf, 2 Dall sheep, 1 mountain goat and numerous coyotes with this round. I will carry my .338 or .375 H&H if I am actually going after grizzly or brown bear, but I am completely comfortable with my .280 in my hands after what I have seen it do. I also hunt with a .30-06, but it cannot replace the .280.I have a 7MM-08, and the ONLY advantage it allows is if it is chambered in an ultra-light rifle. I have a Browning Micro Medallion and it is a light. accurate rifle, just perfect for mountain hunting, but it is no replacement for my .280. I used it once on a sheep hunt, and although I took a sheep with it, I really missed my .280. Choose what you are comfortable with, but the .280 cannot be beat in the medium caliber arena, especially by a .270. No comparison from what I have witnessed first hand.

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from Mark wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Frankly I’ve never seen any advantage of choosing a 7mm over a 30-cal, and visa-versa. However, I seem to gravitate to 7mm. Why? I have no answer. I have owned and shot 280, 7mm Mag and 7 x 57’s and I didn’t see any real difference to accuracy and killing power. Recoil and muzzle blast is another story.BTY-7mm Mag has surely has more recoil than a 30-06.BTY, BTY--Remington 7mm seem to soot betteer than Winchesters. Think this is because of the different rate of twist.I’ve been eye-balling a 7mm-08, but I fail to see why the cartridge would offer any advantage over the 7 x 57 and a 280. 7mm-08 case capacity is simply less*.270 and the guns chambered for it always seem to be a meat gathers, and fine ones at that. I find it significant seldom I see a 270 used for varmints or targets were fine accuracy is demanded. Maybe the rumors are true 270 bullets lack the attention-to-detail 7mm and 30 caliber bullets receive?Later.*My ballistic knowledge comes from T. Whelen’s fine two volume set on exterior and internal ballistics. It’s a pity this work isn’t in print presently.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Well Kevin, thanks for being honest..which I am sure it does happen, the birds were lucky that day, but I guess I was speaking specifically of rifle cartridges and planning more then the day hunt away from home. 12 gauge is like the Miracle Whip of shells, but I can understand if a long ride to a store would ruin a day of hunting, then I would play "bird caddy" as well.

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from Kevin wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Ralph the Rifleman,Yes. I have forgotten ammo before, though only for my bird gun. I spent a morning being a friend's cheerleader and flushing dog, because I forgot my shells. I had brought a 12ga., while he had brought a 20ga.; and of course his own 20ga. ammo. It can happen. No stores near this place at that time.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Dave,I agree the .280 Rem has not received due respect from the hunting/shooting World, but so has other 7mm calibers in general.For the most part, the .30 calibers and the .270 have been the meat takers for most American hunters.Why the 7mm calibers have not become as popular over the years is a real mystery to me since they shoot flat,hit hard, and normally do it with less recoil then the 30's.ps-By the way,has anyone truly used "I forgot my ammo at home" excuse? Please, that's like saying I forgot my tent when I went camping!Unless you travel and your ammo bag is lost/misdirected by baggage handlers,my experience(at least here in Michigan)is that even the most rural sporting stores have a good selection of calibers since they make their income on visiting hunters and most store owners are hunters themselves!

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from Dick Filippini wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Dave: OK, here's a plan. Once a week or so drag another one out of the gun safe and tell it's story - gun and cartridge. With your inventory that should be good for about 8-10 years of good blog articles. Re the .280, a few years ago I bought a couple of .280 Ackley Imp. rifles made up by a gunsmith friend. One on a Rem. M700 action and the other on a Ruger M77. Don't ask why. I could/should blame that sorry SOB Gary Sitton, God rest his soul, for getting me started on the wildcat game. He made it sound so easy and so rewarding. He conveniently forgot to mention the cost factor. I hope God's getting even with him for leading all us poor naive bastards astray. I sure do miss his writing, tho. (Lesson learned: Gun Writers will lie to you once in a while. Go figure.) As for the .280 .vs. .270, one is interesting and the other isn't. If all we wanted to do was kill something, we'd all be using a .30-06. Sometimes it's just the fun of using something a little different than what every other guy in camp has. And since we enjoy rifles and handloading, God knows we don't have any sense to begin with.

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from mike shickele wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

A couple of years back, I had the chance to buy a Remington 700 mountain rifle in stainless steel; the caliber, 280 Rem. I didn't buy the gun because it made no sense to have the 280 when I already had a perfectly good 30-06.I'd only owned one 7mm in my life, and that was a 7mm Rem Mag. The gun was not what I'd hoped, and the cartridge recoiled more than the magazines insinuated that it did. Possibly the fact that I was only 16 didn't help matters.I just picked up a Rem model 7 in 7mm-08Rem. It is the original one with the 18.5 inch BBL, sporting a Remington injection moulded stock. Triggers at 3 pounds, and the stock is glass bedded and free floated. I've started shooting the Hornady 139 Gr. bullet in this gun; accurate, and very little recoil.This could be the start of a beautiful friendship.

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from KJ wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Why has the .280 remained so "vastly unappreciated"? Did Remington just not market the .280 very well, or were buyers just unwilling to spend money on a cartridge so similar to the .270 that Jack O'Connor loved? Or did they see the .280 as just a lacking .30-06?

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from Charles Benoit wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

The 280 cartridge is difficult to find in many rural areas of the South, not to mention under-developed countries. The 270 is easier to purchase,and it is more economical to buy. Just imagine the morning of an important deer hunt and suddenly realizing you left your ammo at home. Bet at least one of the guys at the deer camp could loan you a couple of rounds of 270 to get you by for the day. Not necessarily so for the 280. If one had a choice between the the 280 and the 270, the latter would make more sense.Best regards,Charles

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from Reeladdict wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Yep, the .280 Remington is a necked down 30-06 with a pressure limit of 50,000 cup and the shoulder moved forward so it couldn’t be chambered in a .270 Winchester.
The .280 was set at this lower pressure because it was introduced in Remington’s semi-automatic and pump-action rifles of the 1950’s, which were not designed for higher pressure.
In 1979 Remington introduced the 7mm Express in bolt-action rifles only, (I have a 7mm Express) and this round as has a working pressure of 52,000 cup 2,000 cup more than the .280. I have a Remington reloading manual from 1980 and it lists both the 7mm Express and the .280 and shows the difference in max working pressure as listed above. Dimensionally they are the identical and if used in old autoloaders the lower pressure load of the .280 should be used, but in modern bolt action and semi-auto rifles 52,000 cup or so, the pressure design of the 7mm Express and could be used. The 7mm Express and new .280 are being condemned to the lower pressure of the 1950’s .280 pressure loads which I see in most reloading manuals in the 48,000 cup range and this cheats the 7mm Express owners and .280 bolt action rifle owners out of the potential of this excellent cartridge.
Thanks.

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from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 6 weeks ago

I had one .270 and got rid of it for a .280 and never looked back. I have been a die hard .280 fan for over 30 years. My had a Remington Mountain Rifle and now I have a Remington 700 CDL that I just put a Quick Klip unit in it. I like clip fed rifles. I have my eye on a Browning X-Bolt in .280. Tell me what your .270 will do and my .280 will do better. You have to believe in what you shoot. Other than the grizzly , and I'm not sure they can take a 175 grain Nosler Partition to well, the .280 is the finest all around big game rifles in North America.

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from Reeladdict wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Yep, the .280 Remington is a necked down 30-06 with a pressure limit of 50,000 cup and the shoulder moved forward so it couldn’t be chambered in a .270 Winchester.
The .280 was set at this lower pressure because it was introduced in Remington’s semi-automatic and pump-action rifles of the 1950’s, which were not designed for higher pressure.
In 1979 Remington introduced the 7mm Express in bolt-action rifles only, (I have a 7mm Express) and this round as has a working pressure of 52,000 cup 2,000 cup more than the .280. I have a Remington reloading manual from 1980 and it lists both the 7mm Express and the .280 and shows the difference in max working pressure as listed above. Dimensionally they are the identical and if used in old autoloaders the lower pressure load of the .280 should be used, but in modern bolt action and semi-auto rifles 52,000 cup or so, the pressure design of the 7mm Express and could be used. The 7mm Express and new .280 are being condemned to the lower pressure of the 1950’s .280 pressure loads which I see in most reloading manuals in the 48,000 cup range and this cheats the 7mm Express owners and .280 bolt action rifle owners out of the potential of this excellent cartridge.
Thanks.

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from MONTES_51 wrote 5 years 15 weeks ago

tengo un rifle remington mod. 70 cal 270 y un 30-06 walther aleman y me gustaria saber cual es mejor para la caza de venado cola blanca a una distancia promedio de 300 yardas

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from ishawooa wrote 5 years 20 weeks ago

We running down the .270 in one area and singing the praises of the .280 in another. I have had both for years and can assure you that they are ballistic twins if the .280 is loaded adequately. Nothing more or less. Neither is a 7 mag of any variety although some loads do come amazingly close with the lower weight bullets.

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from RKT wrote 5 years 20 weeks ago

Update - 8 pt 200 lb whitetail in upstate NY. 150 yd shot through both lungs and out the other side. Deer went a few feet and fell down, chest cavity liquid.BAR is in nursing home.

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from RKT wrote 5 years 23 weeks ago

I'd been wanting a rifle in 280 for a while after a guide I knew in Montana and a good friend who hunts in Maine had been singing praises for many years. I picked up a Sig SHR 970 in the caliber, worked up a load with 160 gr TBBC's and 54.3 gr Reloder 19, and brought it out to Montana this past week for mule deer and antelope.Absolutely devastating. I had a huge mulie collapse instantly with a double lung shot, and a 15" antelope go five feet with a shoulder shot.My 7 mm Rem mag BAR is facing retirement.

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from walt wrote 5 years 24 weeks ago

I have just read the pros and cons of the .280. back in 1985 Or 86 I purchased in Prineville Ore. A rem.model 700 in the light weight mountain gun . I had a 9 power variable scope mounted on it. That rifle has been with me on a hunt in az. for elk, too colorado for elk and mule deer, it has served me well in Oregon both deer and elk have fallen with one well placed shot, I dropped a nice bull moose with it in cranberry portage Manitoba canada, it has killed deer in Mo., and last Fall after my retiering to My home State of Michigan, I killed a 9 point white tail on opening day, and returned the 2nd day and killed a 6 pointer, all of my kills have been one shots. NO!! I am not Bragging, just stateing facts, the .280 in my book is one of the finestcalibers ever prodused. for a hunter who can only afford one gun, then the .280 cal. is it. No matter what leagl game you hunt in North america the .280 will do the job, and do it right

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from Ray wrote 5 years 24 weeks ago

I am new to this site but have enjoyed all of your comments. I grew up in northern idaho and owned a 7mm mag. but got tired of getting my teeth cracked evey time I shot it. I now live in Georgia and am hunting from tree stands instead of ridge tops. I have traded into a 280 AI and was not sure I was going to keep it. Thanks to you guys I am really exited about some range time and one on one with some Georgia deer and hogs.Thanks for saving me from trading it off.Ray Swanson

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from Visitor wrote 5 years 25 weeks ago

david,Trim-to Length is 2.530, overall length (with bullet) is 3.350.Go to Hodgdon.com or IMR.com.I would buy a reloading manual or two from Lyman, Speer, etc..280 is sweet.

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from david wrote 5 years 25 weeks ago

need reload inf. for 280 rem. also c.o.l. thanks

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from Dee Das wrote 5 years 28 weeks ago

When I was in college,about 22 years ago, I bought a used Ruger M77 (pre Mark II) in .280 Remington for $250. It came with a heavy barrel. The rifle itself is relatively heavy because of the weight of the barrel.When I fired it from the bench, I was shocked at the accuracy. The gun will put bullets in the same hole at 100 yards consistently. I have shot it with a number of different loadings, including my own handloads and it has always been a stellar performer.I have never been able to achieve the accuracy of this rifle/caliber combination with any other firearm that I have fired. There is also something to be said about the warm feeling I get when I look at a well figured walnut stock. This is one rifle that I will never part with.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 31 weeks ago

The .280 is a study in marketing trial & error. I could be wrong, but I remember the .280 as having been initially introduced in the Model 740 autoloader and the 760 pump, which was a good choice for whitetail deer but it would have made more sense to me to offer this excellent cartridge in a good bolt action like the Rem 721/725. That decision focused on those shooters who preferred the auotloader and slide action rifle to other options. Remington was certain it would sell on its own ballistic merits, and may have given the market more credit for objectivity and acumen than it deserved. The 740 & 760 were not bad choices, especially in the Northeast, but the bolt action is and was unquestionably more popular on both sides of the Mississippi. Compound this error with one of timing; the 7mm Remington Magnum was introduced in 1962, five years after the .280, and Remington's own advertising effort made the .280 pale by comparison. I continue to think the 7mm Mag is the better choice than the .264 Win Mag with which it was supposed to compete in the marketplace. As a hunting cartridge, the .280 Rem gives up nothing to the .270 Win. I'm sure I'll be accused of heresy, but (other than the spectrum of bullet selection) the .280 gives up nothing to the deservedly popular .30-'06 either. In my opinion, the .280 provides a more efficient combustion chamber than the 7mm Magnum.The 7mm Express Remington appellation was dropped because we live in a litigious society and the confusion between the 7mm Express and 7mm Rem Mag had proven problematic.Example: a gentleman a few benches away at the range was firing a 7mm Rem Mag, but experienced difficulties on extraction. On examination of the two ruptured cases that he ejected from his rifle, he'd been given 7mm Express ammo for his 7mm Mag by a relatively inexperienced salesman. Errors like this occurred with embarrassing frequency, so Remington reportedly went back to the .280 Rem designation to avoid being the "deep pocket" in a lawsuit.In summary, I think the .280 is a superbly versatile cartridge. I could say the same about others which (for whatever reason) don't get the attention and recognition they deserve, but the .280 is a fine choice.

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from MileHighShooter wrote 5 years 31 weeks ago

I just picked up a nice used Weatherby Fibermark in 280 rem myself. Its a caliber that's always fascinated me but I could never justify buying a new one, and outside of the new X-bolt, nothing really grabs my attention. However this gem of a rifle with a great caliber was a no brainer. This will be my ultimate back up for everything from coyotes to african plains game. It'll do anything, anywhere in a pinch

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from Ol' Roy wrote 5 years 32 weeks ago

Really got a kick out of the .280 comments! I have a Ruger 77 Mk II Stainless w/ laminated stock topped with a Leupold. I bought this rifle to hunt Colorado elk, but found that it will make relly quick work on Oklahoma whitetails. I have done a lot of handloading in the last 20+ years but this rifle didn't seem to like any of the boattails that I tried to put through it so I tried the Federal Vital Shock 160 gr. Trophy Bonded Bearclaw factory load and was I amazed at it's precision (3/4" five shot groups). My longest shot at game was about 250 yds. Dropped in his tracks. I am a huge fan of the .280!

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from Jim in Mo. wrote 5 years 38 weeks ago

johnny v,How did you find a blog this old? When I ckick on my 'feeds' button the oldest I get is 12/07.

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from johnny v wrote 5 years 38 weeks ago

The .280 is a great cartridge -not a lot of gun makers are offering it anymore. If I had a choice, all things being equal, I'd choose the .280 over the .270.But, there is a lot more ammunition available in the .270 and it's cheaper. Over time, I think the ammo situation will only get more one-sided in favor of the .270.

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from Mike Reeder wrote 5 years 39 weeks ago

If memory serves Remington originally loaded the .280 with a 125-gr. bullet. It was also woefully underloaded. Those two factors probably did more to retard the .280s popularity than anything else. The obvious comparison was to the 130-gr. bullet in the .270 which zipped along at higher velocity with better sectional density, while enjoying the advantage of a long head start. Another problem was that while the .270 was originally offered in the Winchester Model 70, the .280 first arrived in the Remington Model 721. The 721 was a strong, very accurate rifle but it was as ugly as a mud fence. I had a friend who bought a 721 in .280 and he loved it, but he was an exception. In terms of practical hunting I don't think anything you shot with either the .270 or .280 would be able to tell you the difference. Each has its minor advantages, but both are fine cartridges. O'Connor, incidentally, spoke very highly of the .280, and was touting the virtues of a 7mm cartridge based on the '06 long before Remington gave birth to the .280. He was also one of the first to lament its failure to catch on with the shooting public.

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from Larry wrote 5 years 39 weeks ago

stumble on this and wanted to add my 2 cents. I have been hunting for right at 30 years. All my fam used an 30-06 and/or 270 but in having access to ballistics charts I purchased my first .280 in a mountain rifle... I was extremely pleased, but during my divorce I lost the rifle. A few years later I saved some pennies in between the ham sammiches and purchased a Browning A bolt gold medallion with the boss system chambered in .280 and I must say that over the past 18 years between the two I have never lost any game; nor have I ever tracked any.. any further than 30-40 yards. I shoot the 165 grain in factory rounds and I still group at 200 yds avg around 1.00 inch.... simply the best rifle I have ever owned.

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from tom wrote 6 years 9 weeks ago

I got tired of grandads ought6 and tried got a new 280 and love it. 3 shots - 3 deer @ 150yds. Small hole on one side - baseball sized hole on the other. none of them moved more than 1o feet. I've shot alot of rifles and besides my 243win this is by far the most accurate.

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from TO wrote 6 years 10 weeks ago

I should add, the Mk II currently is set up for 139 Gr Hornady SST loads and shoots a 1 minute groupl. I don't know that this bullet is what I want for black bear.

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from TO wrote 6 years 10 weeks ago

I have a Ruger MK II in stainless in 280 Rem chambering. I am going to Prince of Wales, AK in search of black bear. I have been reading on this 175 gr bullet that couples nicely in the 280 casing. Is there a factory load that someone can recommend? If not, what about recommending a bullet and powder for a re-load. Thanks!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 11 weeks ago

DDCIf you are happy with it, who cares?It's a great rifle.

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from jimmy wrote 6 years 11 weeks ago

Thanks for the info, was planning on buying 280 Rem, but now I know I am. Looking at Ruger 7120,$570

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from Carl wrote 6 years 12 weeks ago

I hunt mostly dear and black bear and ocationly elk and I can choose what caliber I want to hunt with anything from 257rob. to 340wheatherby but when I really get serious about picking a true alaround caliber it is without question THE 280 it always does the job with room to spare. Thats how good it is.

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from DDC wrote 6 years 12 weeks ago

A week ago I went to a very large gun show with the mind set of getting a 30.06 rifle, just for the overall versitaly in the caliber. Needlesly to say 6 hours later I walked out with Remington 700 BDL Classic in .280 remington. I did a lot of research before I went and didn't see much on .280 (probably because most of my searches pertained to the 30.06) But after purchasing this gun and yet not having had the chance to shoot it yet, I am very very pleased with my purchase. Every day I have done more and more research on the .280 and happy I have this rifle now. Does anyone tned to agree or disagree with my purchase?

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from S.E.Hall wrote 6 years 13 weeks ago

I've just read what people have put on this site about yhe .280 Rem. I bought my model 700BDL .280 from a friend, and tried it against my Rem. model 700 .30-06, my grandson's .270 and a 7mm Rem Mag. It grouped closest of all. My grandson and his friend said I wasn't hitting the target, but the group (3 shots) could be covered by a nickle. They were in the bullseye at the nine o'clock position. After one target shooting session, I had two people want to buy the rifle. I told them that I would take $5,000 for it and they thought I wasn't serious. I can't forsee ever parting with it. It is factory with a 24" barrel and the others that I've seen all have 22" barrels. I reload for it as I do for most of my guns and it functions flawlessly with anything I feed it. I LOVE IT.

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from John Thurman wrote 6 years 16 weeks ago

i recently did some trading with a guy and picked up a 1 year (1994 i think) production remington mountain rifle in 280. the guy supplied about 50 rounds of preloaded 280 ammo, but i dont shoot other peoples reloads myelf ( saw a friend one time shoot a guys 7MM mag reloads during his preseason rifle check, the first 3 shot OK, but the 4th round was somehow way overloaded, and it split the action on his winchester model 70, the bolt came back and buried itself in his cheek...) so the first thing i did was pull the bullets and reload the bunch with varget powder and 139gr hornaday SP bullets and headed to the range. i setup at 200 yards and popped the exact center of the 10 ring with the first shot. i shot the second round and didnt see it on the paper...hmmmm....i shot the third round,same thing so i checked the scope and rifle over,nothing wrong, so i went down range to look at the target. the rifle had shot a perfect 1 hole group at 200 yards...ive always heard good things about accuracy with the 280 remington, but never expected this kind of precision out of it. recoil was very managable, and after about 30 rounds i didnt wake up with a sore shoulder the next day. id compare it recoilwise to a bit more heavy than a 243. i am completely sold on the remington 280. great round, and even though the 270 club hollers that theres not much differece in the two, id have to completely disagree with them. the remington 700ADL MTR is topped with a 4x16x40MM BSA scope, and is one hell of a shooter. im sure it will do quite nicely for whatever you want to hunt with it. ive even found loads online for this handly little rifle that some of those guys were using for headshooting rabbits and treerats

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from death by 280 wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

i have a 280 rem bdl its heavy but then i am a big boy if any one doubts the 280 drop some light mags in to yours and show up a few 7mm mags that will get there atintion btw i get sub 1\4 inch 5 shot groops at 100 yards with mine. with less than $150 work it is pillar bedded and the barell is floated whith a 2 1/2 pound trigger

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from Alex wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

I own a .270 (std. Howa 1500 bolt-action) AND a .280 (Remington 7600 pump action) why ? The 1st for ambushing red deers (from tree-stands) and the 2nd for driven hunts (mainly wildboars). I use the .270 with 150 grains bullets and the .280 with 165 grains bullets ... (my .243 is loaded with 95 grains bullets and works just fine on roe deers in a Howa Varmint). Here in Europe the .280 popular for only one reason : the 7500 & the 7600 from Remington ... Otherwise hunters prefer the original caliber aka the "BRENNEKE" 7X64 ... This caliber may seem "exotic" to you but its performances are a little bit over the "younger" .280The 7X64 is without a doubt the N°1 caliber over here even if it is several decades old ...I don't like it (sometimes too fast and too expensive in the most interesting bullets / factory ammo from RWS especially ...). But it's worth a try ... if you like Steyr-Mannlicher or Sauer rifles (I don't mention Blaser because I think their bolt action rifles are just too expensive and poorly designed "toys").;-)

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from O Garcia wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

The .280 Remington should have been a popular, commercially successful cartridge, except it was introduced by Remington, which has a bad history of killing otherwise good cartridges.Aside from their successes with .22 centerfires (even though the .222 Rem. and .222 Rem.Mag. are commercially dead, they at least were beaten by the .223 Rem.) and the 7MM Rem. Mag., Remington have had no great "hit" with cartridges bearing their name. Most are hanging on, but just hanging on.(OK, I'm going seriously OFF TOPIC here.)6MM - commercially dead. See Mr. Petzal's cartridge guide from July 2007 issue. Great cartridge that didn't sell well..25-06 - hanging on..280 - hanging on (most buyers will go for the .270). Great cartridge that has no visceral appeal.8MM Rem. Mag. - dead! Should have been the .340 Weatherby of Remington, but once again, Remington's conservative loading and poor marketing did the Big Eight in..350 Rem.Mag. - the .325 WSM of the 1960's. While the .325 WSM is now being hailed as the new "it" cartridge, the .350 is a pariah. Chambered only by Remington, and in a wonderful rifle (Model 7) that is for righties only. On a personal note, sad.The Ultra Mags - the .300,.338 and .375 Ultra Mags didn't really do any more than what the .300, .340 and .375 Weatherby's offered.The Short Action Ultra Mags (SAUMs) - suffered from a really long and awfully bad name. Remington should have dropped the "Ultra" on these shortfats. It's like the days of Art Mashburn's Super Magnums again. At least, Mashburn's were truly Super. They (SAUM's) were also completely "scooped" by the Winchester WSM's.Perhaps the best proof that the Ultra Mags, whether long or short, have failed to make a big mark? Remington advertises sniper rifles (in its military website) that are chambered for .338 Lapua. Wow! Remington can't even convince buyers that it's . 300 and .338 Ultra Mags are just as good.THANK GOD Remington didn't mess up the .416 Remington.

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from Bob Geary wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

RE: 280 Ackley Improved. Nosler now has brass available for 280 AI. I bought 50 rounds just to have some brass with the correct headstamp. Looks like Norma brass to me.

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from MidnightBanjo wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

Just looking over this blog and the thought happened to cross my mind that my wife wants to go deer hunting with me, but my 30-06 is "just too loud" and kicks like a mule(her words, not mine). Anyone out there have a recomendation for a good make/caliber that isn't "too loud" and won't "kick like a mule"? Thanks, and hope you all remembered to give thanks on thanksgiving!

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from rs wrote 6 years 20 weeks ago

.280 is a great caliber especially here in Montana. Hoping to get an AI with savage action. Killed my first Elk with it at 330yds

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from mcnabb wrote 6 years 21 weeks ago

The "reason" for the .280's greatness is found in the devastating power of that long 175 grain bullet in a standard length action. There's nothing else like it - it will slay dragons. To get the same coefficient from a 30-06 you'd have to use a 220 grain bullet and your choice is limited. Plus the load behind it would be a tremendous thumper if you wanted anything like the reach and trajectory of a .280. You'd basically be shooting the throat out of your 30-06, trying to get 300 magnum performance out of the smaller case. You can do it all with a .280, no sweat. For my money, it's the single greatest "sweet spot" in sporting rifle loadings.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

I wish I had bought my Weatherby LW Sporter in .280 Rem a few years back. Now that I have the .30-06, I probably won't get one. After all the hoopla about the Model 70 .270 Win from Cactus Jack, I decided to never own one just to be oppositional. the .280 would fit in between my .35 Whelen and .257 Roberts nicely. So would a 7x57 Mauser!

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from Lancer wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

I've got a Ruger 77 MKII Stainless,shoots realy well 3 shots into .75 inch with me shooting...got it for $400 used,with rings,without scope.I like the rifle,many have claimed the 77 has bad accuracy,have not seen any problems with mine.

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from mr.coon wrote 6 years 23 weeks ago

when saving up for my first rifle i was firmly against having what everyone else had. so i scoured "best deer cartridges" articles and ballistic charts for months.the .280 came up in every conversation and was tops in most of the writers books. it was always describes as not well known and under appreciated, much like how i felt about my teenage self back then. it sounded like a match made in heaven... and boy was it ever.11 years, 50 deer, and several hogs later my .280 remington model 700 mountain rifle is still at my side... after seeing how my gun has performed over the years my father, brother in law, and 5 other friends set aside their .270s and now all shoot 280 mountain rifles.

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from bubba wrote 6 years 50 weeks ago

I just bought a Nosler 48 and if this is any indication of the work they do; I would buy one of their custom rifles in 280 Actley Imp. Too bad they don't make the 280 A.I. in their Md 48; their customs are a little too heavy for my taste (10#'s)

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from joey wrote 7 years 7 weeks ago

I am looking to buy a .280 cal. rifle. Any suggestions or advice on what make and model, and where is the best plaxe to look for one. thanks. Joey

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from Matt wrote 7 years 13 weeks ago

I own the .280 M700 Mountain Rifle and it was purchased new in 1997 or 1998. This rifle has the non montecarlo stock with drop plate. I prefer it to the Detachable Box magazines that the new models come with. The magazine may be hard to leave at home but its not hard to forget in the truck. This rifle has been used predominately for NW Pennsylvania Whitetails and black bears. Its loaded with hornady 139 SSTs and 140 grain nosler partition bullets. Both loads are chronographed at well above 3000 fps. The performance on whitetails is unmatched by any other rifle of similar caliber that I own. Because the rifle is light its felt recoil is actually more than my 30-06 in M700 BDL. Despite the marginally more felt recoil the .280 is my choice. The half inch to three quarter inch 5 shot groups at 100 yards I have fired with this rifle make it more than accurate enough to take game animals consistantly at 400 yards. I shot the biggest buck of my life at 345 yards and the deer just collapsed. 175 pounds dressed. I honestly want to get another one of these rifles in synthetic just so that I dont feel bad doing serious hunting with his rifle that leads to wear and tear.

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from Visitor wrote 7 years 17 weeks ago

if you have a 7mm06 reload for it its great.280 is the same except they made the case .050 longer where you could not chamber a 280 in a 270 can use a 280 neck sizer die 3006 cases and have a shooter.

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from Adam wrote 7 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks Dumb*ss.I heard that the 7mm 06 turned into the .280 so I purchased a box and the round was too long so I returned them. I then contacted a gunsmith who lived a fair distance away and he said he would have to do a chamber cast on it. It sounded expensive so I didn't pursue it any further. I am just going to hang it on the wall above a shadow box anyway but it would be nice to have some ammo for it.

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from Dumb*ss wrote 7 years 20 weeks ago

To Adam: Based on your information, I believe you have something very close to a .280 Ackley Improved. And it is a wildcat, although Kenny Jarrett (custom gunsmith/gunmaker extraordinaire) has made up a gazillion of em. But you should have a qualified gunsmith check the rifle to make sure. If he's smart, he'll do a chamber cast and check dimensions to confirm it. I believe Jarrett can also provide brass and loaded ammo for it - if indeed it is a .280 Ack. Imp. Then, and only AFTER you've had the rifle checked and OK'd by a qualified gunsmith, you should be able to fire standard .280 Rem. ammo in it to fireform brass and then reload it yourself. Assuming you want to and are able. There is lots of reloading info and dies available for the round. And it's a great round, by the way. I have two of em and swear by em. If it isn't EXACTLY a .280 Ack. Imp., you can send fireformed brass to RCBS and they'll make a set of dies for you. Hope this helps and good luck.p.s. Have the gunsmith also tell you on what action this rifle is based, and he might even be able to tell you who rebarreled or rechambered it to 7mm-.06 Imp. Some of the old gunsmiths stanmped their names on their work.

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from Adam wrote 7 years 20 weeks ago

I have my Grandmothers rifle and it says 7mm 06 imp on the barrel, any idea what this round is now? Wildcat?

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from .280 fan wrote 7 years 31 weeks ago

I used to be a solid .30-06 fan until I started shooting a .280. I have hunted in Alaska with a .280 Remington rifle since 1984. This is one of the cartridges that kill well beyond their ballistics. I shoot nothing but 160 grain Nosler Partitions, and have never lost an animal when hit with one of these rounds. I have taken 5 blacktail deer, 9 caribou, 3 moose, 2 black bear, 1 grizzly bear, 1 wolf, 2 Dall sheep, 1 mountain goat and numerous coyotes with this round. I will carry my .338 or .375 H&H if I am actually going after grizzly or brown bear, but I am completely comfortable with my .280 in my hands after what I have seen it do. I also hunt with a .30-06, but it cannot replace the .280.I have a 7MM-08, and the ONLY advantage it allows is if it is chambered in an ultra-light rifle. I have a Browning Micro Medallion and it is a light. accurate rifle, just perfect for mountain hunting, but it is no replacement for my .280. I used it once on a sheep hunt, and although I took a sheep with it, I really missed my .280. Choose what you are comfortable with, but the .280 cannot be beat in the medium caliber arena, especially by a .270. No comparison from what I have witnessed first hand.

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from Mark wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Frankly I’ve never seen any advantage of choosing a 7mm over a 30-cal, and visa-versa. However, I seem to gravitate to 7mm. Why? I have no answer. I have owned and shot 280, 7mm Mag and 7 x 57’s and I didn’t see any real difference to accuracy and killing power. Recoil and muzzle blast is another story.BTY-7mm Mag has surely has more recoil than a 30-06.BTY, BTY--Remington 7mm seem to soot betteer than Winchesters. Think this is because of the different rate of twist.I’ve been eye-balling a 7mm-08, but I fail to see why the cartridge would offer any advantage over the 7 x 57 and a 280. 7mm-08 case capacity is simply less*.270 and the guns chambered for it always seem to be a meat gathers, and fine ones at that. I find it significant seldom I see a 270 used for varmints or targets were fine accuracy is demanded. Maybe the rumors are true 270 bullets lack the attention-to-detail 7mm and 30 caliber bullets receive?Later.*My ballistic knowledge comes from T. Whelen’s fine two volume set on exterior and internal ballistics. It’s a pity this work isn’t in print presently.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Well Kevin, thanks for being honest..which I am sure it does happen, the birds were lucky that day, but I guess I was speaking specifically of rifle cartridges and planning more then the day hunt away from home. 12 gauge is like the Miracle Whip of shells, but I can understand if a long ride to a store would ruin a day of hunting, then I would play "bird caddy" as well.

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from Kevin wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Ralph the Rifleman,Yes. I have forgotten ammo before, though only for my bird gun. I spent a morning being a friend's cheerleader and flushing dog, because I forgot my shells. I had brought a 12ga., while he had brought a 20ga.; and of course his own 20ga. ammo. It can happen. No stores near this place at that time.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Dave,I agree the .280 Rem has not received due respect from the hunting/shooting World, but so has other 7mm calibers in general.For the most part, the .30 calibers and the .270 have been the meat takers for most American hunters.Why the 7mm calibers have not become as popular over the years is a real mystery to me since they shoot flat,hit hard, and normally do it with less recoil then the 30's.ps-By the way,has anyone truly used "I forgot my ammo at home" excuse? Please, that's like saying I forgot my tent when I went camping!Unless you travel and your ammo bag is lost/misdirected by baggage handlers,my experience(at least here in Michigan)is that even the most rural sporting stores have a good selection of calibers since they make their income on visiting hunters and most store owners are hunters themselves!

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from Dick Filippini wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Dave: OK, here's a plan. Once a week or so drag another one out of the gun safe and tell it's story - gun and cartridge. With your inventory that should be good for about 8-10 years of good blog articles. Re the .280, a few years ago I bought a couple of .280 Ackley Imp. rifles made up by a gunsmith friend. One on a Rem. M700 action and the other on a Ruger M77. Don't ask why. I could/should blame that sorry SOB Gary Sitton, God rest his soul, for getting me started on the wildcat game. He made it sound so easy and so rewarding. He conveniently forgot to mention the cost factor. I hope God's getting even with him for leading all us poor naive bastards astray. I sure do miss his writing, tho. (Lesson learned: Gun Writers will lie to you once in a while. Go figure.) As for the .280 .vs. .270, one is interesting and the other isn't. If all we wanted to do was kill something, we'd all be using a .30-06. Sometimes it's just the fun of using something a little different than what every other guy in camp has. And since we enjoy rifles and handloading, God knows we don't have any sense to begin with.

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from mike shickele wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

A couple of years back, I had the chance to buy a Remington 700 mountain rifle in stainless steel; the caliber, 280 Rem. I didn't buy the gun because it made no sense to have the 280 when I already had a perfectly good 30-06.I'd only owned one 7mm in my life, and that was a 7mm Rem Mag. The gun was not what I'd hoped, and the cartridge recoiled more than the magazines insinuated that it did. Possibly the fact that I was only 16 didn't help matters.I just picked up a Rem model 7 in 7mm-08Rem. It is the original one with the 18.5 inch BBL, sporting a Remington injection moulded stock. Triggers at 3 pounds, and the stock is glass bedded and free floated. I've started shooting the Hornady 139 Gr. bullet in this gun; accurate, and very little recoil.This could be the start of a beautiful friendship.

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from KJ wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

Why has the .280 remained so "vastly unappreciated"? Did Remington just not market the .280 very well, or were buyers just unwilling to spend money on a cartridge so similar to the .270 that Jack O'Connor loved? Or did they see the .280 as just a lacking .30-06?

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from Charles Benoit wrote 7 years 36 weeks ago

The 280 cartridge is difficult to find in many rural areas of the South, not to mention under-developed countries. The 270 is easier to purchase,and it is more economical to buy. Just imagine the morning of an important deer hunt and suddenly realizing you left your ammo at home. Bet at least one of the guys at the deer camp could loan you a couple of rounds of 270 to get you by for the day. Not necessarily so for the 280. If one had a choice between the the 280 and the 270, the latter would make more sense.Best regards,Charles

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from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 6 weeks ago

I had one .270 and got rid of it for a .280 and never looked back. I have been a die hard .280 fan for over 30 years. My had a Remington Mountain Rifle and now I have a Remington 700 CDL that I just put a Quick Klip unit in it. I like clip fed rifles. I have my eye on a Browning X-Bolt in .280. Tell me what your .270 will do and my .280 will do better. You have to believe in what you shoot. Other than the grizzly , and I'm not sure they can take a 175 grain Nosler Partition to well, the .280 is the finest all around big game rifles in North America.

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