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The Gun Nut's Ten General Rules of Survival

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August 29, 2007

The Gun Nut's Ten General Rules of Survival

By David E. Petzal and Phil Bourjaily

1. If you're lost, you're seldom in bad trouble. You get into bad trouble when you start making dumb mistakes because you're lost. A friend of mine calls this "the cascade of errors."
      
2. If you're lost in the woods in the late fall or winter and 3 p.m. comes around, wherever you are, stop and build a fire. You're done traveling for the day.
      
3. Carry three means of starting a fire. Practice building fires before you get lost. It's one thing to read about it in a manual, and quite another to actually perform the task.
      
4. Don't count on rifle shots to signal your presence. I've seen them fail twice, once in Montana, once on Anticosti Island. In both cases, searchers were a half-mile away and couldn't hear.
      
5. If you have an axe or a hatchet, it's best not to use them. Lost is one thing; lost with a finger lopped off is another. I know an Alaska guide who does drop camps and will not drop you off if you have an axe. A saw, yes.
      
6. Don't let terror cause you to lose control of your bodily functions. I know of someone this happened to in the U.P., and he had to peel his longjohns in -10 degrees.
      
7. If you try to travel in the dark, flashlight or no, you're asking for it.
      
8. Don't worry about dying. Worry about how you're going to pay for the rescue when they find your foolish self.
      
9. Barring hypothermia, you can endure far more than you think you can. A man in good shape can go two weeks without food. Ask any high school wrestler.

10. If you really are going to die, do it with dignity.

Comments (154)

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from Chuck wrote 6 years 2 weeks ago

Since survival is the subject, I have a question about shot placement on a charging brown bear.I fish alaska often and see them always, sometimes rather close. I would prefer to give a bear the benefit of the doubt and hope he's false charging but would like to end the encounter swiftly if not. Where is the best place to aim on a close in frontal shot. I would expect to get one shot, MAYBE two if I'm lucky. We have a 45-70 Guide gun and everyone carries either a .44 or .454 mag. Does anyone out there have any personal experience with this or a sane suggestion??Thanks for any replies

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from Rick Weiss wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Lots of good tipsAs a Yooper I hav split more woodwith a axe or maul than most people ever see, 30 years of burning wood)Not to mention my Game skining axe I bought from CabelasHunting is a risque bussness, I poop you not

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from Buddy wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

I always carry a deck of cards.If you ever get lost, sit down and start playing solitaire. Some s.o.b. will come along and tell you how to play!!!!

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from Guess Who! wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Mark-1On a good hunting horse you can take you eye off what you would be normally doing and looking at all angles thus seeing game that normally wouldn’t been seen if you were on foot, ATV or any other means.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Oh my goodness!Two days away from this blog and I should have left my boots on to read it!Too nice a day to be blogging long so I am going fishing!SA

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Michael, You’re not only a distinguished veteran, but a real horseman. Protect that poor Beast of Burden from injury. I can understand you waiting for dawn to ride out. It takes years to replace a trained horse.McBride—Horses are a passion comparable to hunting and music. Between blooded horses, well-bred bird digs, and fine firearms much of my life’s fortune has been squandered…..as claimed by an ex-spouse. BTY—I still have the horses, dogs, and guns. :-)Down to three-horses. A fine, trained racing Q-Horse from Missouri I’ve had 26 of his 29-years. I’ve had him so long we can grunt to each other and know what we’re saying. He’s retired now. I then had three-trakehners for eventing and military horse trials, and other riding. I have still my foundation Trakehner mare. 23, but can keep the pace. I’m training a 4-yr T-bred that’s never been to the track. I’ll end my riding career on this kid. I’m 58. I’ll start this T-bred over low fences next year.The world looks different on the back of a good horse. Charlie Russell said dog may be man’s best friend, but it was the horse that got him out of the cave. I think this holds true even with ATV’s and other motorized forms of transport.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

I think its going to be a while before maw lets me go out to 11 at night im only twelve.and i figured it out Trae was right but thanks for helpin

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Youngun, take your compass outside and look at the direction that you know its north. Now look at your compass, which end is pointing that way. Know your equipment before going a field. Nothing is worse than Mother Nature at Her worst and your fumbling around 11 at night trying to get the darn thing to work

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Sticks and stones will break my bones, but come a little closer and I’ll apply them to your forehead! LOL!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Clay Packer your ass out when you get lost!

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from youngun wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

thank you Trae I was starting to think that all hunters did was brag fight and fuss like little kids.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

youngunon my compass the red arrow points north. for the rest of ya'll is it that hard to answer a question for a young kid trying to learn.

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from Clay Packer wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Clay Cooper, you sissy! You pantywaist! You get a little heat and run away! Stay here and save us! You are my hero! Only you can save us from the likes of the evil Mark 1 and Demko!

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from Kodiak wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

JA DemkoI did my own research on Coop. Alamogordo Search and Rescue affiliated with the New Mexico State Police. Alaska wasn’t tied to a SARs unit but the locals called him frequently for search’s. Maricopa County Sheriffs Dept. Search and Rescue Posse.Ok, what else do you need to know about him? You will not find this on the Internet.

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from Kodiak wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

1. "the cascade of errors."?Stop Think Organize and Plan.2. If you're lost in the woods in the late fall or winter and 3 p.m. comes around?Darn, I’m just getting started!3. Carry three means of starting a fire?Who the hell you think I am, a smoke shop!Clay got it right on this one. Vaseline and a magnesium fire stick. Don’t worry about getting it wet and no expiration date! Totally reliable4. Don't count on rifle shots to signal your presence. 2 mags of tracers in a M1A when air units are looking for you would be good!5. If you have an axe or a hatchet, it's best not to use them?Didn’t your daddy tell you not to play with dull tools! The sharper it is, the less force is required to cut.6. Don't let terror cause you to lose control of your bodily functions.Man, can’t understand you guys on this one. You can spend one night with your X-wife. Isn’t that scary enough?7. If you try to travel in the dark, flashlight or no, you're asking for it?I told you in #6, being in the dark with the X-wife in the dark and a flashlight, you’ll go blind!8. Don't worry about dying.Why would I, can you say Freedom!9. Barring hypothermiaDon’t you know, that’s why you bring your girl friend along!10. If you really are going to die?Do you want to end this fun I’m having. She’s lost, not me refer to #9. My GPS says the truck is only 75 yards! O’Baby!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

JA Demko,Never mind.I’m having a battle of wits against an unarmed mind!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Gone a few days and all hell breaks loose. You know, it’s not really worth it here. All this blog is for is some manufacturer like Barnes to toss their goods in just to test the waters and some ignorant person that never done anything starts a hate and discontent match. The era of the Marksman is in fact dead. Replaced by range finders, shooting sticks, 22 inch magnums and other electronic gizmos. Anyone that has worked SAR knows that there will be a no thank you at the end of the search. All the SAR teams pack up their equipment and go home. The only satisfaction is that someone went home that night. I know I said some things I should not have. You naysayers can have this to yourself. Besides, my 7-year-old Grandson wants to go deer hunting this year I have a lot of work ahead of me.Dr. Ralph and the Gang, it’s been nice knowing you all!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Peace, already!Let's get some meaningful topic discussion going here or just head on down to the tavern for beer and B.S.No need to attack folks on the Gun Nut. Take issue with the opinions expressed and ignore those who seem moronic to you.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I say what I think about other people, it's true. See, things like this blog are about other people, mainly. If I want reloading data, I'll go to a reloading manual where the data is worth considerable trust...I come here for the interplay of personalities. You are perfectly free to voice your thoughts on me, you know.It's a long held opinion of mine that anybody who presents himself as having expertise on the web better be prepared to have more corraboration than just "I said so." The web is laden with combat veterans, pro hunters, martial artists, investment counselors, and so on who range from being delusional, to liars, to outright con-men.In Alaska, Clay Cooper may be so highly regarded that they build gigantic graven images in his likeness and burn their children before them. But you know what? I don't live in Alaska and I never heard of Clay Cooper.

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some poeple really do know what they are talking about, but are condescending or just asses. I met one on last week's bear hunt in Maine. I didn't like him, he was a big know-it-all. But he was right. I wished I could tell him he was full of it, but I couldn't. It pissed me off that he got his bear and I didn't. But that's the way it goes.

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from Charlize Theron wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Regardless of how much a person knows, or purports to know, excuses not that person's arrogance, rudeness, name-calling, or insulting words or behavior. Barry Bonds may know something about hitting a baseball, but he's still one of the biggest (pun intended) d**kheads that ever played the game. Mr. Demko is right in that a name on a blog is simply a name, and words written on a message board are worth exactly nothing. Mr. Cooper is certainly not a gentleman. He dominates the discussions and belittles those who disagree with him. He is, as another poster in this discussion has noted, a self-proclaimed expert on every topic. It is my observation that the best teachers are also the best students, and the best students are the ones asking questions, not the ones trying to impress others with all their knowledge.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

i ment one needle not on needle

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

i dont mean two needles its just on needle but it pionts north and south ...its a regular compas or i reckon no one on hear knows which side points north,so instead of answering the question their making excuses.

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Say what you will Mark. If I had a charging Brown Bear, Clay will be my back up!Got to back on the road for another 4-6 weeks. Back to those truck stop with greasy burgers and lot lizards

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Cooper" must have driven his Officers and Senior NCO’s to take two Prozac’s w/slug of booze daily. So…..That he did! My god he did! Drove them nutz! Funny thing, He was right 99% right of the time and a step ahead of themCoop didn’t work with Military SAR. He worked with local and state SAR. Given time off to go and assist them. I do remember the Commanders gave him total support. It was good PR for the Base

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey Mark-1I have met and trained under pompous asses like Coop?Clay isn't at all like that Mark, in fact he is one of us, doesn’t smoke or drink much and is a total blast to be around. He isn’t one of those Rambo guys, just a lot of know and self sufficient from all the years of experience. I know him from Holloman AFB New Mexico and Eielson AFB Alaska. He is not the kind that walks around like a pompous ass like the ones we do know in real life.By the way, if you still like riding horses try the west rim trail by Sun Spot New Mexico and the White Sands National Monument is great for a midnight moonlight ride on horse back. Your horse’s hoofs will be polished like a mirror!

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

On Coop: I’m glad I’m not the only one. JA brings up a curious point about the web and blogs. Goggling my name brings up 2.5 million entries. I never thought I was that active, and talk about ID Thief without even bringing in India and Indonesia!I'm not a mean-spirited.I don’t know. Anything is possible, but unless gov’t and USAF radically changed policies there a bunch of inconsistencies. E.g. When it was written he went off on his own in SAR, my first thought was how did he get off base? USAF base commanders close the place down, bring in command posts. Then, how was it he was allowed to fiddle with gov’t communications? These are areas jealously guarded with paranoia by US Military and Gov’t... "Cooper" must have driven his Officers and Senior NCO’s to take two Prozac’s w/slug of booze daily. So…..Hunting wise and shooting: Likely a gifted rifle target shooter, but that doesn’t equate to hunting skills. Most of what Coop says about shooting, hunting, and handloading isn’t provocative. It’s rather generic and many times: outdated and very narrow, access via manuals and web. I read too many outlandish, pop-off statements, too. If I were to hunt with a guy like this, my initial thought, “This is a someone I’m gonna hav-ta baby-sit.”Dave Petzal is an expert and wordsmith of immense stature and respect and of obvious broad intellect..and couragous. F & S isn’t about to hire a Charlatan. I get the distinct impression Cooper tries to bait, depreciate, dismiss, and diminish a very gifted and noble man. I don't like it.Let Cooper start his own website for his Faithful.I would not go hunting tiger with Coop. What others do is their own business.Bye, Gotta go to work.

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1I didn't say that I didn't use those survival skills during my enlistment. I jumped in w/ the 82nd Airborne in Panama in 89, have a Purple Heart for that action and went somewhere in the desert a couple of yrs prior. I have a freind that you might have seen on the history channel in Afganistan. In a combat situation you usually have Buddies around to keep each other on the same mind set ie: survival. It was when I was ALONE that it was the hardest for me to keep from panicking. I have met and trained under pompous asses like Coop. I didn't like them during the training because they make it hard, but those hard lessons are the ones you automatically fall back on w/o thinking and they could save your life. They did for me. On the other hand, when I would see them off duty and have a beer w/ them, they were almost always great guys. They never had to buy themselves a beer, and that's saying alot! In regards to my horse incident, iot was in South Park, Colo. Near the towns off Jefferson, or Fairplay at my Father's small ranch. I was following a small herd of elk during hunbting season when they went back behind the ranch into Pike's Ntl Forest. I followed roughly 10 to 12 miles and I had my back azmith locked in on the other side of the cabin. It just got dark on me as it was on the eastern slope. That it so RUGGED terrain, dark, I had no flashlight, so I didn't want to get my horse hurt and really be in a jam. So I decided to wait until morning. It was the longest night of my life. I was 15 yrs old when that happened and when I showed up the next morning my Father abotu beat the snott out of me. I would have taken that beatin w/ a smile I was so happy to be back. It can get spooky out there!

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from LCC Owner TMB wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr.Demko,I find it interesting that the only thing you can say is what you think about other people. Nothing you have said is to contribute to this blog only H&D. So tell me Mr.Demko what experiences do you really have? I checked the web and couldn’t find you. Therefore you don’t exist and you’re nothing more than an imaginary carector! A sock puppet you are, from a nasty foot! Mr. Demko far as I’m concern your nothing more than a counterfeit sportsman.For someone to be by your own words, combination of Daniel Boone and Euell Gibbons with a dash of Elmer Keith for flavor, must be the real thing. Think and say you will, but the truth your not! It doesn’t take much to know a phony when you see one.If Mr. Cooper were a phony, Dr Ralph and the Gun Nut Gang would be all over him! There is so much in this world Mr. Demko and you will not find them on the Internet. You must go and explore for them and discover them for yourself.LCC Owner TMBBy the way, don’t bother to comment. I’m just passing thru

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Demko,you are a trip man!

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

A little very casual searching finds that there is a Clay Cooper who is a country music performer. There's another who makes balloon animals. There's no Clay Cooper listed in the Alaska directories, though there are a couple C. Coopers.Clay Cooper remains nothing but a name on somebody else's blog to me.IRL, he may actually be a combination of Daniel Boone and Euell Gibbons with a dash of Elmer Keith for flavor. I don't know that, though. Maybe if Petzl vouched for him, his words would carry more weight with me, since Petzal has his mame, phiz, and reputation all over this blog. A bunch of other nobodies, who could quite easily be sock puppets, chorusing "Clay da man!" doesn't send me.The internet is a wonderful, magical land where anybody can claim to be anything and_since none of it is face to face_run little risk of having to back up anything they say. Accordingly, I take anything I read on the web, especially on blogs and discussion boards, with a whole shaker full of salt. Independent corraboration of claims like Mr. Cooper's goes a long way towards making me willing to accept net denizens as actually being who they claim they are.You are free to be as trusting and accepting of what strangers say as you wish to be, of course.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Youngun, if it has two needles, you really need to check your meds

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

youngunWhat do you think? If you cannot figure that out? STAY HOME!

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dittos Dr Ralph,I find Clay to be a trusted old friend; I just haven’t met him yet. If I were lost, I’d rather have someone with years of practical experience looking for me rather someone who just went to school. When I was in the Military, the first thing I was told coming out of tech school, forget what was taught in school. It was those with practical experience that knew how to get the job done best. How can you put practical experience in a book or even teach a person in a 6 week or 6 month course?Clay you speak with experience and those that lack of it will call you a pompous ass and that’s ok with me.

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Michael,Very happy you made it safely through your enlistment without having to use your survival schools' skills. No one needs that stress and anxiety.BTY--I'm a horseman myself. Tell us about where and what took you into the wilds on horseback. Sounds remote if you didn't want your horse to take you back home.

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dr. Ralph you totally correct. Clays spelling and grammar really sucks. If and when I do get lost, I pray to god its Clay to coming for my sorry lost ass!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay is an opinionated pompous ass... so am I. I believe he has 50 years of personal experience living the outdoors man's life. I also believe he lived in Alaska, shot competitively for the USAF, hand loads and grew up in a military environment. I put much faith in his posts and hands on knowledge and if his grammar and spelling are atrocious it doesn't diminish the truisms he espouses.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have another ? does the red or the silver needle point north on a compas the dang thing has two needles.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

MichaelIt’s great that you went thru all that training Michael. Tell me, after your training did have to use those skills? Clay is an experienced SAR and he went looking for those lost or stranded and did so alone practically every time. Sub zero Artic temps and zero viz due to ice fog didn’t stop him. Having the training you went thru versus Clays training is totally deferent. Looking for and being looked for are two different worlds. Clay probably doesn’t remember me from Eielson AFB Alaska, but I do remember him. I would say he is one of the best or crazy as hell. His gear was totally different than all the other SAR’s. Totally self sufficient and with his VHF radio he was able to link into all the government frequencies such as the State Police, Military and HAM Radio repeaters. His environment is the outdoors and he was always out there regardless of conditions. The worst it got the better he liked it

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from Play Pooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

You moron!You idiot!You pantywaist!Urologist a bunch of sissies!I've got experience! Listen to me!

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from LC Mgr Trinity Outdoors wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I don’t think that Coop is being a pompous ass to begin with. I find that Coop is self-sufficient and likes to hunt alone. He has a lot of know rather than those with a lot of BS blow. If you read his post without dissecting it, you will find this to be true. You can go to all the schools and courses in survival. The real question is, when you’re put in a real life situation what is going to be your actual response going to be?I hope someday soon, I will have the honor of hunting with The Coop

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

YoungunA whistle is a very good signalling device! Can be heard about four to five times as far away as the loudest human voice. Also; unlike gun-shots which are expected in the deer woods, we aren't expecting to hear a whistle, that makes it valuable if you are hurt during the time noone is expecting you back at camp, as well as when lost. Super light, the cost is inconsequetial; buy three carry two!SA

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I've been lost and had to spend the night out. Once w/ my horse, and once completely by myself. It is EXTREMLEY hard to keep from panicking. I think that is the hardest part of being lost. If you can control the panic and think straight you have one hell of a chance of getting out of there. I think DP's short to the point list is pretty damn sound. As to Coop being a pompous ass, I would still love to hunt w/ him. I've gone through a few survival courses as a former combat air contoller in the AF. Some were tougher because I trained w/ USA,USMC,USN and some of those guys hated us wing wipers. Some of them I wished I could have called an airstike on!

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

hey if ya'll hear about me gettin killed in the woods or somethin make sure im buried with all my guns and my boat.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

in all my hunter safty classes ive just been told to have a whistle if i get lost? will it help that much?

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey WillyEielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived (sic), that’s within walking distance",Sounds logical and factual to me. I’ve been there

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1 one more thing, you might want to try to get to know Clay. I’ll bet Clay would be a BLAST to be around!I’m out of here! Those woods are calling me!

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

To Clay it’s not personnel? I believe he truly cares for us

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1, I wouldn’t bet on that Sir. On this blog he is out of his element, but put him out in the backcountry he is a true survivor. Of all the people on this blog, I would choose Clay to go hunting with over the rest. I know that You know that, you just didn’t think about it and having those experiences he is trying to get the point across to those that he hopes may just save there life. That search he was on in Arizona was pretty dramatic, don’t you think? How many dead bodies have you come across in the backcountry Mark? To Clay it’s not personnel just trying to keep someone from repeating what he has witnessed! Picture yourself watching someone about to get seriously hurt or eminent death. You yell out to them they aren’t listening and give you the finger? How would you handle that?

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Ed J, who pulled your chain! I went back to read what was said and Clay has been around this planet abet more than you and I. I’m fed up with all you naysayers trying to take on those that been there and done that. Perhaps instead of cutting people down like Mark-1 about Fairchild perhaps you need to ask real questions. Mark-1 really stuck his foot in his mouth. Eielson AFB is one of the harshest places to hunt in the winter, deep in bear country and home of one of the Military Artic Survival schools, which happened to be Clays back yard for 4 years. Another point Clay says is true, “Who is better equipped to handle extreme conditions than the people that live, play and hunt there!” This brings up a point. Take two people, one in Mississippi and one in Arizona. In the dead of summer switch them when the temperatures are the same in the high 90’s instantly switch their locations. At home they have no problem dealing with the heat. But in the other locations they are in trouble. Getting acclimated to the place your at may take as long as 3 days. Temperature, humidity, elevation, type of weather and terrain.The Bow Man!

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

(Chuckle) Love these old NCO's!Coop acted pretty much as I expected. The guy has some knowledge and can read a website, but has no self control in order to get it across. I don't know how he survived this long having done as he claims.Person with no self control certainly can't control dramatic situations in dangerous lands nor other people. Worse: They can be baited.....Grease for someone's wheels.

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from willy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

From a single post:"It’s obvious you never (sic) been thru a Search and Rescue coarse (sic)", "You moron can’t (sic) even get that right!", "you stupid moron, Eielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived (sic), that’s within walking distance", "You idiots," "It’s no wonder you pantywaists sit there with jealousy!"Wow. When you can't defend yourself with logic, or cite statistics or research to back up your endless tripe, then slur, ridicule, and of course, resort to name-calling. (And do it with poor spelling and bad grammar - it makes calling others "moron" somewhat ironic, wouldn't you say?) How small! How typical.

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from Bowman wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Demko, I’ve been to several states that require a youth to pass a Hunter Safety Course. A part of every class is a survival section. Every class I’ve been to, the Instructor gives the same information to what Clay says is true, “those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out." The key word is “MAJORITY”, not all.

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from Shooter#1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

This sh*t you guys spew is better then the VIEW my wife watches!Thanks Boys!

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from Ed J wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Who's laughing now?We are.Clay didn't answer the question, he attacked the questioner.Don't like the the message? Shoot the messenger.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper,Who I am and what my qualifications are don't matter. I'm not the guy presenting myself as an expert, one Clay Cooper is. You're the fellow who made some pretty definite statements in a manner like you knew what you were talking about. You're the guy who keeps telling us that you know many things. Since you said it, it's up to you to prove it; it's not my responsibility to prove your statements false.If I were you, Mr. Cooper, I'd probably be Googling my little heart out for some pertinent statistics in order to avoid looking like a complete blowhard.

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from Shooter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay sunk their battleships on that one and no bomb damage assessment is needed!Good shot Sarge!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Who's laughing now!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JA Demko - I'll require more than just your say so on that before I'll accept it as fact?Tell me Demko, what experience do you have anyhow? It’s obvious you never been thru a Search and Rescue coarse, yet alone a Hunter Safety Course! That’s a scary thought.Mark-1 Fairchild? You moron can’t even get that right! -- The 336th Training Group, U.S. Air Force Survival School at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., provides Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training primarily to aircrew members. Instruction concentrates on the principles, techniques, and skills necessary to survive in any environment and return with honor.Instructors assigned to the Survival School teach seven different courses to approximately 6,500 students annually. Five of the seven courses are taught at Fairchild. The other two courses are conducted at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., and “Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.” (Clays back yard June 86 thru June 90, that’s 4 years range monkeys!)Tell me Mark-1, no I haven’t been to Fairchild. If you notice the training sights for Fairchild, you stupid moron, Eielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived, that’s within walking distance.Every time you Range Monkeys open your mouth, you get both barrels!Who is better equipped to handle extreme conditions than the people that live, play and hunt there!You idiots, it’s great to have served in the Air Force for 20 years and travel around the world. With each new assignment comes new learning and adventures. It’s no wonder you pantywaists sit there with jealousy!You guys are too funny!By the way Willy, I’d change your name if I were you! I can see it now, he goes into a European bar and says, HI I’M WILLY! The response would be the funniest ever!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Probably the reason most dead people are found within sight of a road is because those that venture further are not found... if I were to die hunting my two sons or two best friends are the only ones who would even begin to be able to find me. I'd like to keep it that way.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

By the way.I have spent all of my life in the woods and there is no better place for me to spend my death than the woods...Hopefully its a quick one.And i agree die with dignity imgoing down with a smile on my face.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

well im not a fan of clay but it is a fact that most people are found withen a truck or road or something of the kind.I will have to go and find where i heard this info but i assure you when i do i will post it.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Yep. Those who think they know everything realy irritate those who do.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Yea..I'm with Ed J..I thought you were speaking of my ex for a minute there?

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from Ed J wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

willyThe dictionary defines expert as; ex meaning the former as in ex wifeand pert as meaning some thing small and insignificant therefore Clay Cooper is the former insignificant.

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from willy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Demko,Clay Cooper enjoys throwing his opinions around, and has experience at just about everything. He is an expert on every subject broached on this blog. That explains his voluminous posts. You cannot win an argument with someone who is an expert on everything. It is an exercise in futility.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper didn't just state an opinion. He asserted "May I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out." Note that lack of any sort of qualifiers like "I think" or "I believe" or "In my opinion." Mr. Cooper clearly wants this to be accepted as fact. He hasn't come forth with any kind of numbers or any source for this assertion. Well, call me a skeptic. Clay Cooper is nothing but a name on somebody else's blog to me. An assertion that dramatic requires better citation than he has offered before I'll accept it. To date, Mr. Cooper has offered little other than that he said so and that he is a veteran to support anything he's had to say. I can go down to the VFW any night of the week and there's a whole line of men sitting at the bar who offer the same.

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

BRA:I thought I’m quite restrained responding to gibberish and ludicrous dogma. I admit moments where I’m overwhelmed and return old, bad habits. I’ll try harder to be more sensitive.

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from Black Rifle Addict wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1 and Demko...must you challange everyone with an opinion here on the blog?I have never sky jumped without a parachute, but I know I will most likely die if I do!

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from Richard Grimes wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

The 12 Essentials:1. Fire starters - Matches, “Bic” lighter, steel wool, candle stubs2. Map(s) of the area you are traveling. USGS Topo Maps know how to read it, know how to orientate it, know how to tell someone where you are on it (grid coordinates). Remember the only way to not get lost is to know where you are all of the time. If you pull your map out of your pocket AFTER you are lost you will have a much hard time orientating yourself.3. Compass – Silva Ranger for me. GPS too Times have changed4. Flashlight – Headlamp LED bulbs, extra batteries (for in camp chores NOT for night travel). I do not travel after dark unless it is a matter of life & death.5. Extra Food – mine has always been 2 of those huge snickers bars that we eat once we get back to the car.6. Extra Clothing – Rain / wind protection, at least a emergency poncho and a good hat with a wide brim. I carry a Tillies and a wool hat.7. Sunglasses, Sunscreen lotion, Bug Spray8. First-aid kit – basic kit for minor stuff and a triangular bandage (lots of uses)9. Knife – I carry both a large Buck sheath knife and a Leatherman Wave Multi-tool (times have changed)10. Emergency Space Blanket11. 50’ Parachute Cord (with the six little strings inside it)12. Water – Water treatment pills (instant kool-aid does wonders to improve the taste of treated water), I carry 2 bottles and a bladder (I always try to have a full bottle of drinkable water available)

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

In other words, Mr. Cooper, you have nothing but your sayso?

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some military know survivial, many don't. Unless Coop went through Fairchild, he's bush league. USMC/Navy have their own survival schools. I imagine USA has theirs. Coast Guard certainly has theirs.One thing in common: Extreme sports in extreme conditions for folks with a good chance of being behind lines. Takes a bunch o cash to feed that many bananas so the training better be justified. No office warriors or keyboard-types ...or part-time hobbyists. Only operation types get to play.Hate to pop the bubble, but unless policy has changed this is the way of the gov't world.

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from Black Rifle Addict wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey Demko-Cooper has you on this one..don't mess with us military boys;we know out survival sh*t!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JA Demko25 years of SAR, says I’m right!

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

obviously the best way to keep from getting lost is by not getting lost but apparently you often don't have a choice. before any outing you should check maps to make sure you know where you'll be. leave detailed notes for you significant other and even on your truck. don't be stupid. and if your really worried about it think about how long we've been looking for osama bin "forgotten" and figure out how your not gonna be caught.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

"May I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out."I'll require more than just your sayso on that before I'll accept it as fact.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dave PetzalMay I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out. The mind has shut down of all logic. It’s impossible to put everything what you and I know in a short way to get the message across without someone coming up what if? What ever you say or I say, the other can come up with for or against what is being said.The bottom line is this. Every outing is like a fingerprint. No two are the same. Geological to meteorological, health condition and drugs taken, to what we ate, to what clothes you are wearing, even the attitude, the list is endless, all summed up play a serious roll of the final days outcome.

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from SteveC wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

For those who missed it, check out the March 2005 issue of F&S. Keith McCafferty’s article on his survival “experiment” says more than could ever be written here.That said, "cascade of errors" about sums up your average lost outdoorsman.

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from Chev Jim wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have been "turned around" in the woods a number of times. When you are in dense woods, you cannot orient on terrain. After a while, the trees all start to look alike. So I have been using a compass for the last three decades. I'll probably get a GPS one day. I do carry a cell phone, and these days can almost always get a signal where I hunt. I also carry a "day pack" with a little food and some bottled water. It also has a waterproof poncho in case of rain. I got soaked during one hunt and I know I was just an hour or so away from hypothermia--so I started carrying the poncho. There's also at least two knives, a box of ammo, matches and a lighter. And I normally pack a handgun, like a Glock 29, as well. I've never had to spend an unplanned night in the woods, but I have no doubt that I could. Knowing that you could always break a leg or suffer other injuries, you cannot always get out of such trouble--so you'd better let people know where you are going. And, oh yes, don't throw away your clothes or other gear!

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from Boar Buster wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

There is no dignity in dying. I think Dave has mortality issues.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

DaveI have heard that people in late stages of hypothermia actually do feel so warm they strip off their clothes so I guess that might be why they are found that way. I figure if I came in that way what could be so wrong with going out that way! Thanks for the advise on the big words; I'll sure try to avoid 'em from here on, education is a bad thing. Tongue firmly in cheek I am.SA

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

When it's my turn, I couldn't think of a better place to die with dignity than in my home woods in northern wisconsin. Once(if)they find me, though, they'll probably have to quarter my carcass just to get me out. I ask to be cremated, right there in the woods, and for someone to plant a tree for me. Use my ashes to fertilize this tree. And in this manner, I will live on...truly becoming a part of the place I love so much. What could be more dignified than that?

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Do you want to live forever?

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from Dave Petzal wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

To SIlver Arrow: A surprisingly large number of people who die in the wilderness are found without a stich of clothes on. They panic, start to run, overheat, peel their clothes, and then it's all over. It's best to be found sitting under a tree in an attitude of composure, with a calm, detached look on your face, or what's left of your face.Then, whoever finds your remains can say, "Well, he was silly and improvident and it cost him his life, but he went out like a man."You will understand why you would want to after you age a while.By the way, I would take it easy on words like cogitate and scion. You don't want to appear to be educated.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

DaveI am all good with your list, as I said above. But how does one die with dignity and why would one want to?I am too young to have cogitated long on the topic. When my time comes I'd rather go out like that certain former Vice President and scion of a well heeled American family -- in the company of a couple of beautiful young women...SA

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony OI didn't see one person suggest you buy a .30-06 for your Missouri whitetails. I saw a lot of alternatives put forth, good ones too!If you are dead set on the '06 after all, there are rifles for it in all action types from single shot to semi auto. If you are not new to rifle shooting you know the drill; try a lot out before you plunk your Benjamins down on the counter. Wear the clothes you'll likely wear when hunting, mount and swing the rifle, how does the thing feel? Can I carry this all day on a stalk hunt? Any one of them is inherently accurate enough for the shots you have discribed but the key is are you going to want to practice enough with it that making that shot is second nature?SA

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony I changed my mind. Buy a Jarrett Rifles Signature Series with Custom Wood Stock. Click on my name at the bottom and it will take you to their website. Guaranteed to shoot a half inch group at 100 yards...Just how deep is your pocket?

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from Tommy D wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

If I am hunting in an area where there's a chance I might get LOST, I do the follwing: I dont send my ex-wife her check for that month......its only a matter of , she'll find me.!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony O... the Remington 700 has been around 44 years and has earned a reputation for being accurate, dependable and relatively inexpensive. If you only own one big game gun it should be a Rem. Model 700 in 30-06. Go green...

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from Danny Boy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Magnesium fire starter:easy enough to use with practice.Lasts forever and 100% reliable under any conditions if one uses the right technique and has decent tinder (such as vaseline/oil soaked patches)Bic or other Lighter: easy to use but NOT 100% reliable by any stretch. works great if it's not too old, or too cold or too windy, and one has plenty of dry tinder. Contrary to popular belief, a lighter does NOT put out enough heat to get damp material going.Lighter with oil-soaked patches: quick and easy, excellent as long as your lighter works.Matches: quick and easy, and wooden ones put out more heat than a lighter for sure. But they get old, must be replaced, and even supposedly "waterproofed" matches must absolutely be kept in a watertight container. Even then, if said container gets really cold, condensation inside can ruin the matches you think are okay.Bow/drill setup: Takes a LOT of practice to master. Even for a master under ideal conditions it takes considerable time and energy to get a fire going with a drill. First time and it's dark and raining? Just forget it already.Flint/steel/charcloth: almost as good as the magnesium starter, so long as one masters technique beforehand and keeps the charcloth dry.If near your stranded vehicle in a blizzard: motor oil or diesel is a far better aid to the fire making process than gasoline. The former 2 burn hot and steady; but gasoline's just a quick flash in the pan.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

for whitetail mostly

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

ok so everyone says i need a 30.06 but the question that follows is which one should i go after?

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from Gritz wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Just one thing to consider when thinking about relying upon gadgets or even upon old "tried and true" methods, ever try to get unlost when you have just fallen through the ice and it is negative 10? If you are not quite sure where you are or you know that you are not certain that you can make it back to your truck without second guessing, then an entirely different set of rules apply to what you should and should not be doing in the woods. A lot of people get into trouble because they think that they can take care of themselves in any condition. Match your risks with the circumstances. Besides, the first buck my father ever shot was about 3 miles back in a cypress swamp just before dusk when he was 21. It was a 10 point buck pushing 200 lbs. It doesn't pay to get the biggest buck in the middle of a swamp when you can't move the thing. Exit strategy is always important.

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from Gritz wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have to share this one. My family has a long tradition of hunting up by Bolder Junction in Wisconsin. My father tells me of when he was a boy and all of the Gangs of "hunters" would come up from the cities and plop themselves in the middle of a thousand acres of swamp and not have a clue how to stay calm. My uncle was sitting on a clearing one day and noticed a man crashing through the brush. He had his hat off, his jacket off, his gun was long since gone, and he looked like he was about to have a heart attack. It was 20 degrees and he was shouting at the top of his lungs. It was cruel and my uncle probably would have gotten pounded if the guy found out but my uncle watched this man flail around for a good part of an hour. When the man finally came strait through the clearing and saw my uncle he was very upset. "Why did you just stand there the whole time. Didn't you hear me." My uncle never told him but he was just hoping the man would have kicked something up by the racket he was making. Lesson: no matter what you do, have some dignity, a cool head, and for crying out loud keep your pants on and your jacket dry.The "If you are going to die, do it with dignity" rule might actually end up saving your butt.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Welcome back Tommy!Hey MR. Will,print a copy of these instructions so you know what to do?Makes good fire starter! LOL:)--------------------------------Lets get serious for a moment. If your really lost you are going to wish you had some things that would have prevented you from being lost. What would they be and no Macho stuff. Show me an expert woodsman that never been lost and I’ll show you someone that has not been out there long enough. It’s not the question of if? It’s a question of when! Good topo maps and the best compass in the best of hands still fall short of the perfect, Were in the hell am I!

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from Tommy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Right on Clay. Been a while. How are you?

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from Will wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

First off, if your hunting in a strange place, even with a friend or guide, you should do your homework so you won't get lost. But if you do, print a copy of these instructions so you know what to do. Then when you get home, keep your sorry butt in your backyard.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

There are those that will look down on another hunters by the way they look, the way they dress, the way they outfit themselves just because they make it more easier on themselves. They are more comfortable in the heat or cold and their means of hunting. To some are considered an edge over others. Whither it’s the use of an ATV, shortening their barrel on a magnum to the use of a GPS. We all have our own flavors and standards. I’ve been in conditions hunting from minus 87 below zero to 124 plus. At sub zero temps, batteries, lighters that use fluids/gas and waterproof matches don’t work, guns and equipment freezes up. Because of the experiences and training that I have, the bottom line is this and I will challenge anyone with respect on this. I’d rather carry a GPS to be safe, period! Those Mountaineers on Mount Hood by law must carry EPRB’s. Emergency Positioning Radio Beacons. Activate the EPRB anyplace in the world, everyone and God knows your in trouble and help is on its way. I hunt alone in unfamiliar and some of the harshest environments. When you’re at the table of cards and your life is on the line. I bet you will like to have that 5th Ace up your sleeve!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

About the Gentleman from Pennsylvania came to Phoenix Az with an old photograph of a mounted Sheriffs Posse on top of a hill.He came to search for that hill of that Mounted Sheriffs Posse.Maricopa Sheriffs Posse found him :(

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from Daniel Fortin wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some places in the UP have lots of iron in the ground a compass us almost useless

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Eric, I pray I will never get the call.Do you know what is like searching for a lost or missing person?I will never forget that God-awful night. A gentleman from Pennsylvanian came to Phoenix Az with an old photograph of a mounted Sheriffs Posse on top of a hill just east of Phoenix International Raceway. He wanted to take a picture of that spot. That day was like any other day, I was Coyote hunting to the west a few miles and to me it wasn’t really hot, around 94 degrees with low humidity, a slight wind and sunny. I got the call and responded. Upon arrival and as normal, the Search Coordinator would hold me back at the Command Post to assist and to respond with my ATV like a Jet Fighter would on Ready Alert. When it started to get dark, the clouds rolled and the wind picked up blowing hard. The tracking team was hot on his trail and the helicopter Ranger 1 could no longer assist due to the high wind. An hour or so later that night, they found him and I responded. Upon breaking thru the thick tumbleweeds and brush, my headlights fail upon him just 15 feet away. He was under a bush in a kind of fetal position. His skin was a burnt brown and where the t-shirt protected his skin was bleach white and his body was badly swollen. We believe that He died from exposure. That day I remember it; all he had on was a pair on tennis shoes, blue jeans, a t-shirt and a ball cap. He was high enough to clearly see roads and power lines to the north and behind him just half mile or less to the south starts a very steep mountain range. The chance of being lost?My Humble Condolences to His Family and FriendsA special thanks to the Maricopa Sheriffs Department

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from Tom Obuhanych wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Aw shucks Dave, I just turn on my GPS! Never lost that way.Best Regards,Tom

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from Wayne wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Humping an axe around may not be the best weight per usage scale, however several different kinds of fire starter located in different places, pockets pack ect. is very wise. A piece of hacksaw blade works great on a magesium strip. A small tube of vaseline will let you use a piece of cloth of anykind for a starter.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JoeI worked with MCSO for 4 years and there tired of footing the bill for stupidity! People running around signs that read road closed. They still try to cross-flooded washes. One guy said he can make it just fine in his mini pickup. A moment later we watched a large tree disappear where the road was. He changed his mind, he did! A teenager at a Guns N Roses Concert tried to cross the flooded Salt River. Never made it, they found him down stream several days later.I don’t mind dealing with stupid people, just the ones that abuse the privilege!

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from Eric wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay,No I have never reached had my lighters fail. Matches I carry a lot of so if I break a tip it is no big deal. As far as cold weather goes, you simply keep your lighter in your pocket and it stays warm and it will work. One more thing you have never had to go look for anyone like me.Matches and lighter, tried and proven.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

solar power?Didn't see the sun for 8 days!

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from Joe wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have friends that got lost north of Phoenix near a place called Seven Springs, and when it got dark they called 911. 911 dispatched Maricopa County Sheriff's office helicopter. Helicopter picked them up about 3 miles from their cars. MCSO then charged them about $700 each for cost of helicopter and crew.By the way, temp that night might have dropped to low 60s (it's Phoenix for cryin out loud), and there are no real threats other than dehydration, which is pretty unlikely with the sun down. Idiots. If you can't spend the night in the desert you shouldn't hike.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

In Alaska, the best and most proven Brown Bear protection is a 22 pistol and a pair of tennis shoes.Yes it really works!When the Bear charges you shoot your partner in the ankle and while he is holding his leg kicking around like a roach and screaming, you run like hell!

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

the way i figure it is you should first figure out where your going to be at in the first place. thats why god gave us maps people. next you should try to carry one with you and a compass. or a gps if your into that sort of thing. or better yet. both. i seen a thing from japan that recharges batteries with solar power. figure it out people. lost is only a state of mind. if you try to sit down and figure it out you might just get somewhere.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

#5 Alaska guide has a point. You’re in survival mode. Your cold, hypothermia is setting in, your exhausted, hungry, all of this causing you not to think clearly and you loose your ability to do things. Self-induced injury is eminent and possible death due to environment and/or self inflected harm!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Besides, if you’re a smoker, lighter and matches used in your survival kit will be missing! How many times have you been in the woods and have someone ask you for a light?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey JackNotice the questions from Eric and Mike. I wished I had a dollar for every time the State Police and the Sheriffs Dept called me at 2am to go and look for people like this.And when I was in Alaska, O’BROTHER! Do I really want to go there?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mike, you ask, what do you use as a striker for your magnesium stick?If you had one you will find a striker bar on the side of the stick and you use a metal object like your knife.Eric You say, I can't believe I just read someone calling matches and a lighter a joke. Have you ever reached into your backpack and find that your lighter doesn’t work and your matches don’t light? I have!Matches deteriorate with age, don’t light when wet and last only a moment. Lighters leak, bust easily, freeze up in cold weather and don’t work in the wind. One 2x2 impregnated with Vaseline and wrapped around a key or stick lasts up to 7 minutes. Try that with a match!Magnesium stick and Vaseline, tried and proven!

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from Eric wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I can't believe I just read someone calling matches and a lighter a joke.

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from Mike wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Hey Clay Cooper-What do you use as a striker for your magnesium stick"Hey Richard Grimes-What are your 12-plus essentials?

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from jack wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I suppose the Alaska guide in #5 was tired of saving the "once a year outdoorsmen" from the city. Too bad he has to assume that since a few careless klutzes ruined a trip, all must pay for their cluelessness.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The Bible is a great idea. Those thin pages would make great kindling.Seriously, I'd rather pack a first aid or edible plants book.As far as the bow and drill:"What's 20 or 30 minutes when geographicaly challenged". It will take that long to find and prepare the pieces for the whole thing at least. And 20 or 30 minutes is critical when you are freezing to death. It's a good skill to know and does give one a sense of accomplishment, but that new Swedish military issue "Scout" firestarter or a magnesium firestarter with some cottonballs soak in vaseline or lint from your dryer, along with waterproof matches in a waterproof container will be nice to have when you are in danger of losing fingertips to cold.I too have a large library of survival books, edible plant and first aid books, etc. But there really is no substitute for taking a good course from an instructor.

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

If you wanna use a folding saw, that's fine. Won't knock ya for it. But I was born with a Gransfors in my hand.

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from Matt in MN wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with Nomen. A folding saw may the "safest" way to go, but if you can't operate a hatchet, perhaps you should be photographing wilflife instead of hutning with a firearm. Come on people.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The biggest joke I see is someone spending time and money buying or making waxed tip matches, a bic lighter or some oddball fire starting system that has a shelf life and it’s useless when you need it or doesn’t live up to your expatiations. If you want a 100% fire starting system you only need two items. A magnesium fire starter and a bottle of Vaseline. Totally water proof! Yep, you guessed it, if your going to get screwed being lost you might as well make the best of it. To use the bottle of Vaseline, first you need a piece of cloth. A 2”x2”gun cleaning patch works great. Lay the cloth flat on a surface and apply enough Vaseline onto the cloth to saturate it. Then shave off a small amount of magnesium on to the patch. Not much just a pinch will do. Now use the striker to light it. You now have about 5-7 minutes of flame. Also you can use the Vaseline as a first aid cream.Far as cutting wood, I use a folding saw.Old saying goes?Keep It Simple Stupid! (KISS)On more thing from the Coop. If you think your lost, just set down and listen. Chances are you will hear a vehicle in the distance. The 3 O’clock rule? If the Owls hooting and the Coyotes are singing, then you’re in big trouble. At 3 you better have a solid plan and know what direction to be headed back. And by the way, if you had a GPS and plenty of batteries, you just might be back in time for chow!And for you folks that like to carry Iodine pills for drinking water purification, you better make damn sure that your not allergic to the stuff.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, you crack me up!Hope those Longjohns were synthetic so they won't rot soon and continue be a beacon for years to come!I had hunted remote areas solo for many years until I had an out of body experience in Montana a few years ago. I was north of Yellowstone way up the Boulder drainage on a cold day. After not seeing shooter deer or elk for several hours, I hiked back to my truck to some lukewarm coffee and a nap. It had been spitting a few snowflakes, but nothing much in additional accumulation. I started the truck and reclined the seat and dozed off for about an hour. I awoke to my truck covered with inches of snow and snowing harder all the while. I got out and cleared the windows with my snow brush and contempleted my options. I decided to eat my lunch and then head down to the main road. I dozed off for a few minutes and then got out of the truck to relieve myself. I almost took a "spinchter vacation" when I saw huge bear tracks in the snow 3 feet from my door! They weren't there 30 minutes prior, else they would have been snow filled. I had assumed the bears were taking their big nap since it was late October.When it came to me that not one soul knew where I was and no one was likely to come up there for days, I quickly decided to get down to town and regroup.I'll never hunt alone that far back or without a plan left with friends or family.

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from Phillip wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

All those fellas wanting to start a signal fire, better be aware of where you are before you do so... unless you want to bake yourself to a crispy black husk.Big fire in southern CA (was it year before last?) was started by some yo-yo hunter who was "lost". Many thousand acres later the idiot realized the error of his ways.Most of the west, during most of the hunting season, is no place to be setting fires.Back up a couple of posts to the discussion of GPS and compass use. And if you're real concerned, have a look at the Personal Locator Beacon, or at least a satellite phone.I understand the over-stated resistance to high-technology (although that seems to belie the huge industry in computer-generated camo, scent-blocker clothing, and super-duper-Hubble rifle scopes)... but not all technology is bad, and taking advantage of certain safety equipment only makes good sense...it doesn't make anyone less of an outdoorsman.

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from jarrod allen wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I have a 1946 win-70 .35 rem very nice E-mail me soon at turboterriers@netzero.net

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from John wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Buy this book, it is the best survival manual I have EVER read, and I've read almost all of them:98.6 Degrees. The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive.You'll thank me!

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I guess you could say what happens in the U.P. stays in the U.P. ehy!

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Oh my, thats really funny

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from Dave Petzal wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

To Joe Nordin: That story was told me by my old friend Norm Nelson, who hunted the UP with his family from the 40s through the 70s. One year, they invited a guest who had never hunted before and posted him a couple of miles from the cabin on a bitter cold morning with a stern warning not to leave his spot; they would come by and pick him up in a few hours.But time went by and he got cold and tried to find his way back and sure enough, he got lost. When the realization sunk in, his sphincter went on vacation, and he took off his longjohns and hung them in a tree.By a miracle he found a logging road, and a logging truck found him and got him back to civilization, but the longjohns stayed in the tree and became a landmark."I'll meet you by the s****y longjohns at 11."

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from Nomen Nescio wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

folding saws are nice, and might very well give more results for your effort (and their size and weight!) than axes do. but even so...has it really got to the point where today's hunters and outdoorsmen just *can't* use an axe or hatchet safely? i thought i saw that skill discussed at great length in a "traditional scouting" resource not long ago. it was suggested this be taught to pre-teenage boys, for goodness sakes. now i'm being told grown men who want to spend time in the Alaskan wilds can't do it? even if a folding saw might make better sense, this still seems a sad kind of skill to be lacking.

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from willy wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Keep calm, keep warm, be smart. Bow drills are interesting, I guess. A few strike-anywhere matches with the head dipped in fingernail polish and stored in a plastic film canister, along with a small chunk of a fire-starter log will get your fire going, and takes up almost no room in your daypack.

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from Richard Grimes wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave,Excellent post. I teach basic outdoor survival to 5th graders in my area. It revolves around three things. Stay put, have a large trash bag and have a whistle.With STAY PUT being #1.I can appreciate the people who add items to your list. We all have our own checklist. I call mine the 12 essentials and it has evolved for 40 years (and it's more than 12 things now too).To the nay says, at least pack a Bible, God will give you mercy, Mother Nature does not give a damn about you!RG

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from Guess Who wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

David, I truly believe that you should have avoided this topic.When it comes to survival, The Gun Nut is not the sharpest knife in the drawer.

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from Mike Strehlow wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

In the old days, you were told that if you were ever really lost, and I mean lost in the sense that you will be frozen coyote chow if you don't do something soon, you should just find a dry dead tree (hopefully in a clearing) and set it on fire. You'll have to drag up a lot of brush and kindling around the tree to get it going, but hey, that's why God put it there. There are rangers in towers whose jobs it is to spot burning trees, and after they have come and put out the fire, you can hitch a ride home on their truck. If they are mad at you for lighting the fire, tell them they can bill you.In these politically correct days, this suggestion will be as appealing as clubbing baby seals in hopes that their dying squeals will summon help, but you know the old saying; "It is better to be tried by twelve than it is to be frozen coyote chow."

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from Dave in St Pete wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

8. Don't worry about dying. Worry about how you're going to pay for the rescue when they find your foolish self.Please feel free to post ANY info on jackass hikers that have been charged!I'm not against this practice, I would just like to see it applied across the board.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Another little factoid. It’s not how in shape you are, it’s all mental. Why do kids last longer than adults? They are not thinking of giving up!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

If you think your lost, S.T.O.P.!S- is for Stop!T- is for Think!O- is for Organize!P- is for Plan!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I assisted in teaching a lot of search and rescue courses. I always say, two items are a must! A magnesium fire starter and a bottle of Vaseline. Totally water proof! Yep, you guessed it, if your going to get screwed being lost you might as well make the best of it. To use the bottle of Vaseline, first you need a piece of cloth. A 2”x2”gun cleaning patch works great. Lay the cloth flat on a surface and apply enough Vaseline onto the cloth to saturate it. Then shave off a small amount of magnesium on to the patch. Not much just a pinch will do. Now use the striker to light it. You now have about 5-7 minutes of flame. Also you can use the Vaseline as a first aid cream.

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from Brian wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Matt:I'm a pyrotechnician. I carry all kinds of amusing ways to make fire.For hunting, the best for me is a bar of magnesium with a strip of built-in spark metal. Nothing to break and nothing damaged by water. All the same, it took numerous practice sessions to make it look easy. I'd take some pride in going out into my back yard with only a knife and start a fire with a bowdrill. What's 20-30 minutes when you're "geographically challenged?" Our hunting seasons are pretty much over by the time the really bad mountain WX sets in.

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from Joe Nordin wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, whereabouts in the U.P. did the guy soil his skivvies? Do you do much hunting there?

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I Don’t Know But I Been ToldTEEEENNNNN-HUT! Face front, you maggots! You’re not back home in Squirrelcrap Junction sipping sodie pops with Bobbie Jo Miniskirt! When you put on that uniform, you stepped into hell – MY hell! And if you disgrace that uniform, so help me I’ll disgrace your behind with my steel-cap boot! Stop crying for mommy! I’m your mommy now, and your daddy, and LBJ and Satan and the furious fist of God himself! And I’ll tell you a little secret: you twinkle-toed turds make me sick to my stomach! You’re about as useless as a diabetic at a pie-eating contest! I haven’t seen such a sorry pile of boobs since the last Madonna tour!You think you’re ready for the Lenovo 3000 N Series Core Duo T2350 NoteBook? You think a pack of booger-eating genetic defectives like you could handle the Intel Core Duo processor, 120GB hard drive, and 1GB DDR2 RAM? Don’t make me laugh! Wasting this fine upstanding laptop on you chimpanzees would be like hanging the Mona Lisa in a septic tank! You expect me to put this integrated webcam, built-in Bluetooth, and fingerprint reader in your slimy paws? You wouldn’t know what to do with it! You sniveling snotballs can’t even take a dump without an instruction manual, a mirror, and a prayer! What’s the matter? Does the truth hurt your precious widdle feelings? If you can’t handle a few nasty words, how on Earth would you handle the Lenovo 3000 N Series Core Duo T2350 NoteBook? Now drop and give me $699.99!

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from suburban bushwacker wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I'm pitching my tent in the 'folding saw' camp.stress, cold, and macho posturing are all known causes of axe-cedents.SBW

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

This article should be printed in the Magazine as a tear out. Should be taught at every hunter safety course.With respect to the 'no hatchet' policy; definitely makes sense. You risk serious injury and use too much energy using an axe or hatchet compared to the benefit from it. A folding saw is best for breaking down firewood if necessary.SA

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from alabamahunter wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The closest to being lost I have been is when me and a buddy were fishing a 60 acre lake in central Florida. We weren't paying attention and it got dark. It was in an orange grove and the truck was parked behind one of the rows of orange trees. We ended up on the wrong side of teh lake and walked around ther lake for an hour before we found the truck. While this dosn't sound very bad you also must remember this lake is infested with snakes and alligators.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The fire bow and drill is a skill that is not impossible, but does take a lot of practice. My suggestion to to take a course that teaches it rather than learning from a book. After you have done it, you will also appreciate how difficult it is to craft the components just right and make the whole thing work under ideal circumstances, much less when you are cold, hungry, and stressed. Thinking about having to construct a firebow and drill in freezing weather is why I always carry matches and a fire striker and steel.

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from Greg Morris wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Ralph: my cellphone has saved my butt when I was lost, in the dark, with no flashlight and no means of starting a fire. I found my way back to the trail with it's meager light.I figure if you are unable to get by with nothing but a compass, knife and flint, then you shouldn't be that deep in the wilderness anyway.

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from Brian wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, you just can't protect people from their own stupidity. #3 is a skill that goes a long way to undoing the bozo complex. Learn this at home before you need it. I can make fire with flint & steel but I want to learn to make and use a bowdrill. Seen it done, can't be rocket science.

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from jstreet wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Good advice Dave, even for hunters like myself who hunt small properties.I still carry a means to make a fire, a first aid kit, a compass, water,a cell phone (yes I know it won't reach out everywhere), a backup battery charger (from everyready) for the cellphone, and a backup flashlight that you crank for power instead of using batteries.The one thing I always do is tell someone where I am hunting and I leave a note on my truck that says exactly what stand I will be in for the day. If I move, I make a call and tell someone where I am.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Staying put and building a fire is one of the hardest things for most hunters to do; it signals defeat to some, but when I lived in ND, most of the hunters that died in the winter were residents.Probably thinking they knew where they were,and could handle the cold.Mother nature is unforgiving for the arrogant.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

As far as #5 goes, if that guide sees my hatchet and decides he will not drop me off, then he can also promptly refund my money. I am not a cub scout, and I can make my own decisions about what gear to bring. Also, what is the logic of letting me have a gun and knife but no axe? This makes zero sense.

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

You might also pay attention to where the sun sets in relation to your campsite/cabin the night before you go afield ,that way if you do have a problem and can see the sun setting you have a goodchance of making it to a familiar landmark or trail and you won't have to spend the night. This is what I did when my compass did a 180 on me in the U.P. I knew that the cabin was in line of where the sun set, not SE where my (U.S. issue) compass was showing. I followed the sunset and within a hour stepped out on one of our trails. Might not for everyone but it worked for me.

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from PbHead wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Good advice Dave. I especially like #10. Make sure you have a will specifically dividing up your firearms among friends, relatives or guys like me. That should help slow down the fist fights at the funeral.

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from Evan wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

sounds like good advice to me.

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from ravenscar wrote 4 years 44 weeks ago

i was talkin to a hunter fisher guy and he told me i shouldnt listen to heave metal will fishin or huntin cause it scare off everything even if its on volume 8 as i always listen to it .is this true?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I carry a small jar of Vaseline® Petroleum Jelly which is a mixture of mineral oils, paraffin and microcrystalline waxes. As some of you know Vaseline® has more uses that WD40. After cleaning the wound, use a small amount to coat the wound then cover the area. This keeps out and lets out the bad stuff also to keep the wound moist.

Vaseline® and magnesium stick is my primary fire starter rather than water proof matches. A 2x2 cotton patch saturated will burn 6 to 10 minutes.

In addition, extra batteries, GI compass and of course the Sharman’s!

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from Scott Bashaw wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

chuck the best shot placement before the charging brown bear gets to you is right under your chin and pray your dead before you hit the ground,....hahaha,...kidding
this is a great question,....surprised no experts answerd

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from Chuck wrote 6 years 2 weeks ago

Since survival is the subject, I have a question about shot placement on a charging brown bear.I fish alaska often and see them always, sometimes rather close. I would prefer to give a bear the benefit of the doubt and hope he's false charging but would like to end the encounter swiftly if not. Where is the best place to aim on a close in frontal shot. I would expect to get one shot, MAYBE two if I'm lucky. We have a 45-70 Guide gun and everyone carries either a .44 or .454 mag. Does anyone out there have any personal experience with this or a sane suggestion??Thanks for any replies

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Staying put and building a fire is one of the hardest things for most hunters to do; it signals defeat to some, but when I lived in ND, most of the hunters that died in the winter were residents.Probably thinking they knew where they were,and could handle the cold.Mother nature is unforgiving for the arrogant.

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from Rick Weiss wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Lots of good tipsAs a Yooper I hav split more woodwith a axe or maul than most people ever see, 30 years of burning wood)Not to mention my Game skining axe I bought from CabelasHunting is a risque bussness, I poop you not

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from Buddy wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

I always carry a deck of cards.If you ever get lost, sit down and start playing solitaire. Some s.o.b. will come along and tell you how to play!!!!

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from Guess Who! wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Mark-1On a good hunting horse you can take you eye off what you would be normally doing and looking at all angles thus seeing game that normally wouldn’t been seen if you were on foot, ATV or any other means.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Oh my goodness!Two days away from this blog and I should have left my boots on to read it!Too nice a day to be blogging long so I am going fishing!SA

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Michael, You’re not only a distinguished veteran, but a real horseman. Protect that poor Beast of Burden from injury. I can understand you waiting for dawn to ride out. It takes years to replace a trained horse.McBride—Horses are a passion comparable to hunting and music. Between blooded horses, well-bred bird digs, and fine firearms much of my life’s fortune has been squandered…..as claimed by an ex-spouse. BTY—I still have the horses, dogs, and guns. :-)Down to three-horses. A fine, trained racing Q-Horse from Missouri I’ve had 26 of his 29-years. I’ve had him so long we can grunt to each other and know what we’re saying. He’s retired now. I then had three-trakehners for eventing and military horse trials, and other riding. I have still my foundation Trakehner mare. 23, but can keep the pace. I’m training a 4-yr T-bred that’s never been to the track. I’ll end my riding career on this kid. I’m 58. I’ll start this T-bred over low fences next year.The world looks different on the back of a good horse. Charlie Russell said dog may be man’s best friend, but it was the horse that got him out of the cave. I think this holds true even with ATV’s and other motorized forms of transport.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

I think its going to be a while before maw lets me go out to 11 at night im only twelve.and i figured it out Trae was right but thanks for helpin

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Youngun, take your compass outside and look at the direction that you know its north. Now look at your compass, which end is pointing that way. Know your equipment before going a field. Nothing is worse than Mother Nature at Her worst and your fumbling around 11 at night trying to get the darn thing to work

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Sticks and stones will break my bones, but come a little closer and I’ll apply them to your forehead! LOL!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Clay Packer your ass out when you get lost!

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from youngun wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

thank you Trae I was starting to think that all hunters did was brag fight and fuss like little kids.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

youngunon my compass the red arrow points north. for the rest of ya'll is it that hard to answer a question for a young kid trying to learn.

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from Clay Packer wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

Clay Cooper, you sissy! You pantywaist! You get a little heat and run away! Stay here and save us! You are my hero! Only you can save us from the likes of the evil Mark 1 and Demko!

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from Kodiak wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

JA DemkoI did my own research on Coop. Alamogordo Search and Rescue affiliated with the New Mexico State Police. Alaska wasn’t tied to a SARs unit but the locals called him frequently for search’s. Maricopa County Sheriffs Dept. Search and Rescue Posse.Ok, what else do you need to know about him? You will not find this on the Internet.

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from Kodiak wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

1. "the cascade of errors."?Stop Think Organize and Plan.2. If you're lost in the woods in the late fall or winter and 3 p.m. comes around?Darn, I’m just getting started!3. Carry three means of starting a fire?Who the hell you think I am, a smoke shop!Clay got it right on this one. Vaseline and a magnesium fire stick. Don’t worry about getting it wet and no expiration date! Totally reliable4. Don't count on rifle shots to signal your presence. 2 mags of tracers in a M1A when air units are looking for you would be good!5. If you have an axe or a hatchet, it's best not to use them?Didn’t your daddy tell you not to play with dull tools! The sharper it is, the less force is required to cut.6. Don't let terror cause you to lose control of your bodily functions.Man, can’t understand you guys on this one. You can spend one night with your X-wife. Isn’t that scary enough?7. If you try to travel in the dark, flashlight or no, you're asking for it?I told you in #6, being in the dark with the X-wife in the dark and a flashlight, you’ll go blind!8. Don't worry about dying.Why would I, can you say Freedom!9. Barring hypothermiaDon’t you know, that’s why you bring your girl friend along!10. If you really are going to die?Do you want to end this fun I’m having. She’s lost, not me refer to #9. My GPS says the truck is only 75 yards! O’Baby!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 32 weeks ago

JA Demko,Never mind.I’m having a battle of wits against an unarmed mind!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Gone a few days and all hell breaks loose. You know, it’s not really worth it here. All this blog is for is some manufacturer like Barnes to toss their goods in just to test the waters and some ignorant person that never done anything starts a hate and discontent match. The era of the Marksman is in fact dead. Replaced by range finders, shooting sticks, 22 inch magnums and other electronic gizmos. Anyone that has worked SAR knows that there will be a no thank you at the end of the search. All the SAR teams pack up their equipment and go home. The only satisfaction is that someone went home that night. I know I said some things I should not have. You naysayers can have this to yourself. Besides, my 7-year-old Grandson wants to go deer hunting this year I have a lot of work ahead of me.Dr. Ralph and the Gang, it’s been nice knowing you all!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Peace, already!Let's get some meaningful topic discussion going here or just head on down to the tavern for beer and B.S.No need to attack folks on the Gun Nut. Take issue with the opinions expressed and ignore those who seem moronic to you.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I say what I think about other people, it's true. See, things like this blog are about other people, mainly. If I want reloading data, I'll go to a reloading manual where the data is worth considerable trust...I come here for the interplay of personalities. You are perfectly free to voice your thoughts on me, you know.It's a long held opinion of mine that anybody who presents himself as having expertise on the web better be prepared to have more corraboration than just "I said so." The web is laden with combat veterans, pro hunters, martial artists, investment counselors, and so on who range from being delusional, to liars, to outright con-men.In Alaska, Clay Cooper may be so highly regarded that they build gigantic graven images in his likeness and burn their children before them. But you know what? I don't live in Alaska and I never heard of Clay Cooper.

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some poeple really do know what they are talking about, but are condescending or just asses. I met one on last week's bear hunt in Maine. I didn't like him, he was a big know-it-all. But he was right. I wished I could tell him he was full of it, but I couldn't. It pissed me off that he got his bear and I didn't. But that's the way it goes.

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from Charlize Theron wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Regardless of how much a person knows, or purports to know, excuses not that person's arrogance, rudeness, name-calling, or insulting words or behavior. Barry Bonds may know something about hitting a baseball, but he's still one of the biggest (pun intended) d**kheads that ever played the game. Mr. Demko is right in that a name on a blog is simply a name, and words written on a message board are worth exactly nothing. Mr. Cooper is certainly not a gentleman. He dominates the discussions and belittles those who disagree with him. He is, as another poster in this discussion has noted, a self-proclaimed expert on every topic. It is my observation that the best teachers are also the best students, and the best students are the ones asking questions, not the ones trying to impress others with all their knowledge.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

i ment one needle not on needle

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

i dont mean two needles its just on needle but it pionts north and south ...its a regular compas or i reckon no one on hear knows which side points north,so instead of answering the question their making excuses.

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Say what you will Mark. If I had a charging Brown Bear, Clay will be my back up!Got to back on the road for another 4-6 weeks. Back to those truck stop with greasy burgers and lot lizards

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Cooper" must have driven his Officers and Senior NCO’s to take two Prozac’s w/slug of booze daily. So…..That he did! My god he did! Drove them nutz! Funny thing, He was right 99% right of the time and a step ahead of themCoop didn’t work with Military SAR. He worked with local and state SAR. Given time off to go and assist them. I do remember the Commanders gave him total support. It was good PR for the Base

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from McBride wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey Mark-1I have met and trained under pompous asses like Coop?Clay isn't at all like that Mark, in fact he is one of us, doesn’t smoke or drink much and is a total blast to be around. He isn’t one of those Rambo guys, just a lot of know and self sufficient from all the years of experience. I know him from Holloman AFB New Mexico and Eielson AFB Alaska. He is not the kind that walks around like a pompous ass like the ones we do know in real life.By the way, if you still like riding horses try the west rim trail by Sun Spot New Mexico and the White Sands National Monument is great for a midnight moonlight ride on horse back. Your horse’s hoofs will be polished like a mirror!

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

On Coop: I’m glad I’m not the only one. JA brings up a curious point about the web and blogs. Goggling my name brings up 2.5 million entries. I never thought I was that active, and talk about ID Thief without even bringing in India and Indonesia!I'm not a mean-spirited.I don’t know. Anything is possible, but unless gov’t and USAF radically changed policies there a bunch of inconsistencies. E.g. When it was written he went off on his own in SAR, my first thought was how did he get off base? USAF base commanders close the place down, bring in command posts. Then, how was it he was allowed to fiddle with gov’t communications? These are areas jealously guarded with paranoia by US Military and Gov’t... "Cooper" must have driven his Officers and Senior NCO’s to take two Prozac’s w/slug of booze daily. So…..Hunting wise and shooting: Likely a gifted rifle target shooter, but that doesn’t equate to hunting skills. Most of what Coop says about shooting, hunting, and handloading isn’t provocative. It’s rather generic and many times: outdated and very narrow, access via manuals and web. I read too many outlandish, pop-off statements, too. If I were to hunt with a guy like this, my initial thought, “This is a someone I’m gonna hav-ta baby-sit.”Dave Petzal is an expert and wordsmith of immense stature and respect and of obvious broad intellect..and couragous. F & S isn’t about to hire a Charlatan. I get the distinct impression Cooper tries to bait, depreciate, dismiss, and diminish a very gifted and noble man. I don't like it.Let Cooper start his own website for his Faithful.I would not go hunting tiger with Coop. What others do is their own business.Bye, Gotta go to work.

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1I didn't say that I didn't use those survival skills during my enlistment. I jumped in w/ the 82nd Airborne in Panama in 89, have a Purple Heart for that action and went somewhere in the desert a couple of yrs prior. I have a freind that you might have seen on the history channel in Afganistan. In a combat situation you usually have Buddies around to keep each other on the same mind set ie: survival. It was when I was ALONE that it was the hardest for me to keep from panicking. I have met and trained under pompous asses like Coop. I didn't like them during the training because they make it hard, but those hard lessons are the ones you automatically fall back on w/o thinking and they could save your life. They did for me. On the other hand, when I would see them off duty and have a beer w/ them, they were almost always great guys. They never had to buy themselves a beer, and that's saying alot! In regards to my horse incident, iot was in South Park, Colo. Near the towns off Jefferson, or Fairplay at my Father's small ranch. I was following a small herd of elk during hunbting season when they went back behind the ranch into Pike's Ntl Forest. I followed roughly 10 to 12 miles and I had my back azmith locked in on the other side of the cabin. It just got dark on me as it was on the eastern slope. That it so RUGGED terrain, dark, I had no flashlight, so I didn't want to get my horse hurt and really be in a jam. So I decided to wait until morning. It was the longest night of my life. I was 15 yrs old when that happened and when I showed up the next morning my Father abotu beat the snott out of me. I would have taken that beatin w/ a smile I was so happy to be back. It can get spooky out there!

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from LCC Owner TMB wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr.Demko,I find it interesting that the only thing you can say is what you think about other people. Nothing you have said is to contribute to this blog only H&D. So tell me Mr.Demko what experiences do you really have? I checked the web and couldn’t find you. Therefore you don’t exist and you’re nothing more than an imaginary carector! A sock puppet you are, from a nasty foot! Mr. Demko far as I’m concern your nothing more than a counterfeit sportsman.For someone to be by your own words, combination of Daniel Boone and Euell Gibbons with a dash of Elmer Keith for flavor, must be the real thing. Think and say you will, but the truth your not! It doesn’t take much to know a phony when you see one.If Mr. Cooper were a phony, Dr Ralph and the Gun Nut Gang would be all over him! There is so much in this world Mr. Demko and you will not find them on the Internet. You must go and explore for them and discover them for yourself.LCC Owner TMBBy the way, don’t bother to comment. I’m just passing thru

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Demko,you are a trip man!

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

A little very casual searching finds that there is a Clay Cooper who is a country music performer. There's another who makes balloon animals. There's no Clay Cooper listed in the Alaska directories, though there are a couple C. Coopers.Clay Cooper remains nothing but a name on somebody else's blog to me.IRL, he may actually be a combination of Daniel Boone and Euell Gibbons with a dash of Elmer Keith for flavor. I don't know that, though. Maybe if Petzl vouched for him, his words would carry more weight with me, since Petzal has his mame, phiz, and reputation all over this blog. A bunch of other nobodies, who could quite easily be sock puppets, chorusing "Clay da man!" doesn't send me.The internet is a wonderful, magical land where anybody can claim to be anything and_since none of it is face to face_run little risk of having to back up anything they say. Accordingly, I take anything I read on the web, especially on blogs and discussion boards, with a whole shaker full of salt. Independent corraboration of claims like Mr. Cooper's goes a long way towards making me willing to accept net denizens as actually being who they claim they are.You are free to be as trusting and accepting of what strangers say as you wish to be, of course.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Youngun, if it has two needles, you really need to check your meds

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

youngunWhat do you think? If you cannot figure that out? STAY HOME!

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dittos Dr Ralph,I find Clay to be a trusted old friend; I just haven’t met him yet. If I were lost, I’d rather have someone with years of practical experience looking for me rather someone who just went to school. When I was in the Military, the first thing I was told coming out of tech school, forget what was taught in school. It was those with practical experience that knew how to get the job done best. How can you put practical experience in a book or even teach a person in a 6 week or 6 month course?Clay you speak with experience and those that lack of it will call you a pompous ass and that’s ok with me.

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Michael,Very happy you made it safely through your enlistment without having to use your survival schools' skills. No one needs that stress and anxiety.BTY--I'm a horseman myself. Tell us about where and what took you into the wilds on horseback. Sounds remote if you didn't want your horse to take you back home.

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dr. Ralph you totally correct. Clays spelling and grammar really sucks. If and when I do get lost, I pray to god its Clay to coming for my sorry lost ass!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay is an opinionated pompous ass... so am I. I believe he has 50 years of personal experience living the outdoors man's life. I also believe he lived in Alaska, shot competitively for the USAF, hand loads and grew up in a military environment. I put much faith in his posts and hands on knowledge and if his grammar and spelling are atrocious it doesn't diminish the truisms he espouses.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have another ? does the red or the silver needle point north on a compas the dang thing has two needles.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

MichaelIt’s great that you went thru all that training Michael. Tell me, after your training did have to use those skills? Clay is an experienced SAR and he went looking for those lost or stranded and did so alone practically every time. Sub zero Artic temps and zero viz due to ice fog didn’t stop him. Having the training you went thru versus Clays training is totally deferent. Looking for and being looked for are two different worlds. Clay probably doesn’t remember me from Eielson AFB Alaska, but I do remember him. I would say he is one of the best or crazy as hell. His gear was totally different than all the other SAR’s. Totally self sufficient and with his VHF radio he was able to link into all the government frequencies such as the State Police, Military and HAM Radio repeaters. His environment is the outdoors and he was always out there regardless of conditions. The worst it got the better he liked it

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from Play Pooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

You moron!You idiot!You pantywaist!Urologist a bunch of sissies!I've got experience! Listen to me!

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from LC Mgr Trinity Outdoors wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I don’t think that Coop is being a pompous ass to begin with. I find that Coop is self-sufficient and likes to hunt alone. He has a lot of know rather than those with a lot of BS blow. If you read his post without dissecting it, you will find this to be true. You can go to all the schools and courses in survival. The real question is, when you’re put in a real life situation what is going to be your actual response going to be?I hope someday soon, I will have the honor of hunting with The Coop

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

YoungunA whistle is a very good signalling device! Can be heard about four to five times as far away as the loudest human voice. Also; unlike gun-shots which are expected in the deer woods, we aren't expecting to hear a whistle, that makes it valuable if you are hurt during the time noone is expecting you back at camp, as well as when lost. Super light, the cost is inconsequetial; buy three carry two!SA

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from Michael wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I've been lost and had to spend the night out. Once w/ my horse, and once completely by myself. It is EXTREMLEY hard to keep from panicking. I think that is the hardest part of being lost. If you can control the panic and think straight you have one hell of a chance of getting out of there. I think DP's short to the point list is pretty damn sound. As to Coop being a pompous ass, I would still love to hunt w/ him. I've gone through a few survival courses as a former combat air contoller in the AF. Some were tougher because I trained w/ USA,USMC,USN and some of those guys hated us wing wipers. Some of them I wished I could have called an airstike on!

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

hey if ya'll hear about me gettin killed in the woods or somethin make sure im buried with all my guns and my boat.

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from youngun wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

in all my hunter safty classes ive just been told to have a whistle if i get lost? will it help that much?

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey WillyEielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived (sic), that’s within walking distance",Sounds logical and factual to me. I’ve been there

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1 one more thing, you might want to try to get to know Clay. I’ll bet Clay would be a BLAST to be around!I’m out of here! Those woods are calling me!

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

To Clay it’s not personnel? I believe he truly cares for us

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1, I wouldn’t bet on that Sir. On this blog he is out of his element, but put him out in the backcountry he is a true survivor. Of all the people on this blog, I would choose Clay to go hunting with over the rest. I know that You know that, you just didn’t think about it and having those experiences he is trying to get the point across to those that he hopes may just save there life. That search he was on in Arizona was pretty dramatic, don’t you think? How many dead bodies have you come across in the backcountry Mark? To Clay it’s not personnel just trying to keep someone from repeating what he has witnessed! Picture yourself watching someone about to get seriously hurt or eminent death. You yell out to them they aren’t listening and give you the finger? How would you handle that?

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from The Bow Man! wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Ed J, who pulled your chain! I went back to read what was said and Clay has been around this planet abet more than you and I. I’m fed up with all you naysayers trying to take on those that been there and done that. Perhaps instead of cutting people down like Mark-1 about Fairchild perhaps you need to ask real questions. Mark-1 really stuck his foot in his mouth. Eielson AFB is one of the harshest places to hunt in the winter, deep in bear country and home of one of the Military Artic Survival schools, which happened to be Clays back yard for 4 years. Another point Clay says is true, “Who is better equipped to handle extreme conditions than the people that live, play and hunt there!” This brings up a point. Take two people, one in Mississippi and one in Arizona. In the dead of summer switch them when the temperatures are the same in the high 90’s instantly switch their locations. At home they have no problem dealing with the heat. But in the other locations they are in trouble. Getting acclimated to the place your at may take as long as 3 days. Temperature, humidity, elevation, type of weather and terrain.The Bow Man!

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

(Chuckle) Love these old NCO's!Coop acted pretty much as I expected. The guy has some knowledge and can read a website, but has no self control in order to get it across. I don't know how he survived this long having done as he claims.Person with no self control certainly can't control dramatic situations in dangerous lands nor other people. Worse: They can be baited.....Grease for someone's wheels.

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from willy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

From a single post:"It’s obvious you never (sic) been thru a Search and Rescue coarse (sic)", "You moron can’t (sic) even get that right!", "you stupid moron, Eielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived (sic), that’s within walking distance", "You idiots," "It’s no wonder you pantywaists sit there with jealousy!"Wow. When you can't defend yourself with logic, or cite statistics or research to back up your endless tripe, then slur, ridicule, and of course, resort to name-calling. (And do it with poor spelling and bad grammar - it makes calling others "moron" somewhat ironic, wouldn't you say?) How small! How typical.

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from Bowman wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Demko, I’ve been to several states that require a youth to pass a Hunter Safety Course. A part of every class is a survival section. Every class I’ve been to, the Instructor gives the same information to what Clay says is true, “those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out." The key word is “MAJORITY”, not all.

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from Shooter#1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

This sh*t you guys spew is better then the VIEW my wife watches!Thanks Boys!

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from Ed J wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Who's laughing now?We are.Clay didn't answer the question, he attacked the questioner.Don't like the the message? Shoot the messenger.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper,Who I am and what my qualifications are don't matter. I'm not the guy presenting myself as an expert, one Clay Cooper is. You're the fellow who made some pretty definite statements in a manner like you knew what you were talking about. You're the guy who keeps telling us that you know many things. Since you said it, it's up to you to prove it; it's not my responsibility to prove your statements false.If I were you, Mr. Cooper, I'd probably be Googling my little heart out for some pertinent statistics in order to avoid looking like a complete blowhard.

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from Shooter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay sunk their battleships on that one and no bomb damage assessment is needed!Good shot Sarge!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Who's laughing now!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JA Demko - I'll require more than just your say so on that before I'll accept it as fact?Tell me Demko, what experience do you have anyhow? It’s obvious you never been thru a Search and Rescue coarse, yet alone a Hunter Safety Course! That’s a scary thought.Mark-1 Fairchild? You moron can’t even get that right! -- The 336th Training Group, U.S. Air Force Survival School at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., provides Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training primarily to aircrew members. Instruction concentrates on the principles, techniques, and skills necessary to survive in any environment and return with honor.Instructors assigned to the Survival School teach seven different courses to approximately 6,500 students annually. Five of the seven courses are taught at Fairchild. The other two courses are conducted at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., and “Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.” (Clays back yard June 86 thru June 90, that’s 4 years range monkeys!)Tell me Mark-1, no I haven’t been to Fairchild. If you notice the training sights for Fairchild, you stupid moron, Eielson AFB is the location called “COOL SCHOOL” or formally known as Artic survival, one mile where I lived, that’s within walking distance.Every time you Range Monkeys open your mouth, you get both barrels!Who is better equipped to handle extreme conditions than the people that live, play and hunt there!You idiots, it’s great to have served in the Air Force for 20 years and travel around the world. With each new assignment comes new learning and adventures. It’s no wonder you pantywaists sit there with jealousy!You guys are too funny!By the way Willy, I’d change your name if I were you! I can see it now, he goes into a European bar and says, HI I’M WILLY! The response would be the funniest ever!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Probably the reason most dead people are found within sight of a road is because those that venture further are not found... if I were to die hunting my two sons or two best friends are the only ones who would even begin to be able to find me. I'd like to keep it that way.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

By the way.I have spent all of my life in the woods and there is no better place for me to spend my death than the woods...Hopefully its a quick one.And i agree die with dignity imgoing down with a smile on my face.

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from Trae B. wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

well im not a fan of clay but it is a fact that most people are found withen a truck or road or something of the kind.I will have to go and find where i heard this info but i assure you when i do i will post it.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Yep. Those who think they know everything realy irritate those who do.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Yea..I'm with Ed J..I thought you were speaking of my ex for a minute there?

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from Ed J wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

willyThe dictionary defines expert as; ex meaning the former as in ex wifeand pert as meaning some thing small and insignificant therefore Clay Cooper is the former insignificant.

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from willy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Demko,Clay Cooper enjoys throwing his opinions around, and has experience at just about everything. He is an expert on every subject broached on this blog. That explains his voluminous posts. You cannot win an argument with someone who is an expert on everything. It is an exercise in futility.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper didn't just state an opinion. He asserted "May I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out." Note that lack of any sort of qualifiers like "I think" or "I believe" or "In my opinion." Mr. Cooper clearly wants this to be accepted as fact. He hasn't come forth with any kind of numbers or any source for this assertion. Well, call me a skeptic. Clay Cooper is nothing but a name on somebody else's blog to me. An assertion that dramatic requires better citation than he has offered before I'll accept it. To date, Mr. Cooper has offered little other than that he said so and that he is a veteran to support anything he's had to say. I can go down to the VFW any night of the week and there's a whole line of men sitting at the bar who offer the same.

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

BRA:I thought I’m quite restrained responding to gibberish and ludicrous dogma. I admit moments where I’m overwhelmed and return old, bad habits. I’ll try harder to be more sensitive.

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from Black Rifle Addict wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mark-1 and Demko...must you challange everyone with an opinion here on the blog?I have never sky jumped without a parachute, but I know I will most likely die if I do!

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from Richard Grimes wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

The 12 Essentials:1. Fire starters - Matches, “Bic” lighter, steel wool, candle stubs2. Map(s) of the area you are traveling. USGS Topo Maps know how to read it, know how to orientate it, know how to tell someone where you are on it (grid coordinates). Remember the only way to not get lost is to know where you are all of the time. If you pull your map out of your pocket AFTER you are lost you will have a much hard time orientating yourself.3. Compass – Silva Ranger for me. GPS too Times have changed4. Flashlight – Headlamp LED bulbs, extra batteries (for in camp chores NOT for night travel). I do not travel after dark unless it is a matter of life & death.5. Extra Food – mine has always been 2 of those huge snickers bars that we eat once we get back to the car.6. Extra Clothing – Rain / wind protection, at least a emergency poncho and a good hat with a wide brim. I carry a Tillies and a wool hat.7. Sunglasses, Sunscreen lotion, Bug Spray8. First-aid kit – basic kit for minor stuff and a triangular bandage (lots of uses)9. Knife – I carry both a large Buck sheath knife and a Leatherman Wave Multi-tool (times have changed)10. Emergency Space Blanket11. 50’ Parachute Cord (with the six little strings inside it)12. Water – Water treatment pills (instant kool-aid does wonders to improve the taste of treated water), I carry 2 bottles and a bladder (I always try to have a full bottle of drinkable water available)

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

In other words, Mr. Cooper, you have nothing but your sayso?

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from Mark-1 wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some military know survivial, many don't. Unless Coop went through Fairchild, he's bush league. USMC/Navy have their own survival schools. I imagine USA has theirs. Coast Guard certainly has theirs.One thing in common: Extreme sports in extreme conditions for folks with a good chance of being behind lines. Takes a bunch o cash to feed that many bananas so the training better be justified. No office warriors or keyboard-types ...or part-time hobbyists. Only operation types get to play.Hate to pop the bubble, but unless policy has changed this is the way of the gov't world.

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from Black Rifle Addict wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey Demko-Cooper has you on this one..don't mess with us military boys;we know out survival sh*t!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JA Demko25 years of SAR, says I’m right!

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

obviously the best way to keep from getting lost is by not getting lost but apparently you often don't have a choice. before any outing you should check maps to make sure you know where you'll be. leave detailed notes for you significant other and even on your truck. don't be stupid. and if your really worried about it think about how long we've been looking for osama bin "forgotten" and figure out how your not gonna be caught.

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from JA Demko wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

"May I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out."I'll require more than just your sayso on that before I'll accept it as fact.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Dave PetzalMay I add, for those who have been found dead majority of them was in sight of a road and obvious clues of getting out. The mind has shut down of all logic. It’s impossible to put everything what you and I know in a short way to get the message across without someone coming up what if? What ever you say or I say, the other can come up with for or against what is being said.The bottom line is this. Every outing is like a fingerprint. No two are the same. Geological to meteorological, health condition and drugs taken, to what we ate, to what clothes you are wearing, even the attitude, the list is endless, all summed up play a serious roll of the final days outcome.

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from SteveC wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

For those who missed it, check out the March 2005 issue of F&S. Keith McCafferty’s article on his survival “experiment” says more than could ever be written here.That said, "cascade of errors" about sums up your average lost outdoorsman.

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from Chev Jim wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have been "turned around" in the woods a number of times. When you are in dense woods, you cannot orient on terrain. After a while, the trees all start to look alike. So I have been using a compass for the last three decades. I'll probably get a GPS one day. I do carry a cell phone, and these days can almost always get a signal where I hunt. I also carry a "day pack" with a little food and some bottled water. It also has a waterproof poncho in case of rain. I got soaked during one hunt and I know I was just an hour or so away from hypothermia--so I started carrying the poncho. There's also at least two knives, a box of ammo, matches and a lighter. And I normally pack a handgun, like a Glock 29, as well. I've never had to spend an unplanned night in the woods, but I have no doubt that I could. Knowing that you could always break a leg or suffer other injuries, you cannot always get out of such trouble--so you'd better let people know where you are going. And, oh yes, don't throw away your clothes or other gear!

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from Boar Buster wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

There is no dignity in dying. I think Dave has mortality issues.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

DaveI have heard that people in late stages of hypothermia actually do feel so warm they strip off their clothes so I guess that might be why they are found that way. I figure if I came in that way what could be so wrong with going out that way! Thanks for the advise on the big words; I'll sure try to avoid 'em from here on, education is a bad thing. Tongue firmly in cheek I am.SA

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

When it's my turn, I couldn't think of a better place to die with dignity than in my home woods in northern wisconsin. Once(if)they find me, though, they'll probably have to quarter my carcass just to get me out. I ask to be cremated, right there in the woods, and for someone to plant a tree for me. Use my ashes to fertilize this tree. And in this manner, I will live on...truly becoming a part of the place I love so much. What could be more dignified than that?

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Do you want to live forever?

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from Dave Petzal wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

To SIlver Arrow: A surprisingly large number of people who die in the wilderness are found without a stich of clothes on. They panic, start to run, overheat, peel their clothes, and then it's all over. It's best to be found sitting under a tree in an attitude of composure, with a calm, detached look on your face, or what's left of your face.Then, whoever finds your remains can say, "Well, he was silly and improvident and it cost him his life, but he went out like a man."You will understand why you would want to after you age a while.By the way, I would take it easy on words like cogitate and scion. You don't want to appear to be educated.

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

DaveI am all good with your list, as I said above. But how does one die with dignity and why would one want to?I am too young to have cogitated long on the topic. When my time comes I'd rather go out like that certain former Vice President and scion of a well heeled American family -- in the company of a couple of beautiful young women...SA

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony OI didn't see one person suggest you buy a .30-06 for your Missouri whitetails. I saw a lot of alternatives put forth, good ones too!If you are dead set on the '06 after all, there are rifles for it in all action types from single shot to semi auto. If you are not new to rifle shooting you know the drill; try a lot out before you plunk your Benjamins down on the counter. Wear the clothes you'll likely wear when hunting, mount and swing the rifle, how does the thing feel? Can I carry this all day on a stalk hunt? Any one of them is inherently accurate enough for the shots you have discribed but the key is are you going to want to practice enough with it that making that shot is second nature?SA

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony I changed my mind. Buy a Jarrett Rifles Signature Series with Custom Wood Stock. Click on my name at the bottom and it will take you to their website. Guaranteed to shoot a half inch group at 100 yards...Just how deep is your pocket?

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from Tommy D wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

If I am hunting in an area where there's a chance I might get LOST, I do the follwing: I dont send my ex-wife her check for that month......its only a matter of , she'll find me.!

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from Dr. Ralph wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Tony O... the Remington 700 has been around 44 years and has earned a reputation for being accurate, dependable and relatively inexpensive. If you only own one big game gun it should be a Rem. Model 700 in 30-06. Go green...

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from Danny Boy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Magnesium fire starter:easy enough to use with practice.Lasts forever and 100% reliable under any conditions if one uses the right technique and has decent tinder (such as vaseline/oil soaked patches)Bic or other Lighter: easy to use but NOT 100% reliable by any stretch. works great if it's not too old, or too cold or too windy, and one has plenty of dry tinder. Contrary to popular belief, a lighter does NOT put out enough heat to get damp material going.Lighter with oil-soaked patches: quick and easy, excellent as long as your lighter works.Matches: quick and easy, and wooden ones put out more heat than a lighter for sure. But they get old, must be replaced, and even supposedly "waterproofed" matches must absolutely be kept in a watertight container. Even then, if said container gets really cold, condensation inside can ruin the matches you think are okay.Bow/drill setup: Takes a LOT of practice to master. Even for a master under ideal conditions it takes considerable time and energy to get a fire going with a drill. First time and it's dark and raining? Just forget it already.Flint/steel/charcloth: almost as good as the magnesium starter, so long as one masters technique beforehand and keeps the charcloth dry.If near your stranded vehicle in a blizzard: motor oil or diesel is a far better aid to the fire making process than gasoline. The former 2 burn hot and steady; but gasoline's just a quick flash in the pan.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

for whitetail mostly

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

ok so everyone says i need a 30.06 but the question that follows is which one should i go after?

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from Gritz wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Just one thing to consider when thinking about relying upon gadgets or even upon old "tried and true" methods, ever try to get unlost when you have just fallen through the ice and it is negative 10? If you are not quite sure where you are or you know that you are not certain that you can make it back to your truck without second guessing, then an entirely different set of rules apply to what you should and should not be doing in the woods. A lot of people get into trouble because they think that they can take care of themselves in any condition. Match your risks with the circumstances. Besides, the first buck my father ever shot was about 3 miles back in a cypress swamp just before dusk when he was 21. It was a 10 point buck pushing 200 lbs. It doesn't pay to get the biggest buck in the middle of a swamp when you can't move the thing. Exit strategy is always important.

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from Gritz wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have to share this one. My family has a long tradition of hunting up by Bolder Junction in Wisconsin. My father tells me of when he was a boy and all of the Gangs of "hunters" would come up from the cities and plop themselves in the middle of a thousand acres of swamp and not have a clue how to stay calm. My uncle was sitting on a clearing one day and noticed a man crashing through the brush. He had his hat off, his jacket off, his gun was long since gone, and he looked like he was about to have a heart attack. It was 20 degrees and he was shouting at the top of his lungs. It was cruel and my uncle probably would have gotten pounded if the guy found out but my uncle watched this man flail around for a good part of an hour. When the man finally came strait through the clearing and saw my uncle he was very upset. "Why did you just stand there the whole time. Didn't you hear me." My uncle never told him but he was just hoping the man would have kicked something up by the racket he was making. Lesson: no matter what you do, have some dignity, a cool head, and for crying out loud keep your pants on and your jacket dry.The "If you are going to die, do it with dignity" rule might actually end up saving your butt.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Welcome back Tommy!Hey MR. Will,print a copy of these instructions so you know what to do?Makes good fire starter! LOL:)--------------------------------Lets get serious for a moment. If your really lost you are going to wish you had some things that would have prevented you from being lost. What would they be and no Macho stuff. Show me an expert woodsman that never been lost and I’ll show you someone that has not been out there long enough. It’s not the question of if? It’s a question of when! Good topo maps and the best compass in the best of hands still fall short of the perfect, Were in the hell am I!

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from Tommy wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Right on Clay. Been a while. How are you?

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from Will wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

First off, if your hunting in a strange place, even with a friend or guide, you should do your homework so you won't get lost. But if you do, print a copy of these instructions so you know what to do. Then when you get home, keep your sorry butt in your backyard.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

There are those that will look down on another hunters by the way they look, the way they dress, the way they outfit themselves just because they make it more easier on themselves. They are more comfortable in the heat or cold and their means of hunting. To some are considered an edge over others. Whither it’s the use of an ATV, shortening their barrel on a magnum to the use of a GPS. We all have our own flavors and standards. I’ve been in conditions hunting from minus 87 below zero to 124 plus. At sub zero temps, batteries, lighters that use fluids/gas and waterproof matches don’t work, guns and equipment freezes up. Because of the experiences and training that I have, the bottom line is this and I will challenge anyone with respect on this. I’d rather carry a GPS to be safe, period! Those Mountaineers on Mount Hood by law must carry EPRB’s. Emergency Positioning Radio Beacons. Activate the EPRB anyplace in the world, everyone and God knows your in trouble and help is on its way. I hunt alone in unfamiliar and some of the harshest environments. When you’re at the table of cards and your life is on the line. I bet you will like to have that 5th Ace up your sleeve!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

About the Gentleman from Pennsylvania came to Phoenix Az with an old photograph of a mounted Sheriffs Posse on top of a hill.He came to search for that hill of that Mounted Sheriffs Posse.Maricopa Sheriffs Posse found him :(

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from Daniel Fortin wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Some places in the UP have lots of iron in the ground a compass us almost useless

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Eric, I pray I will never get the call.Do you know what is like searching for a lost or missing person?I will never forget that God-awful night. A gentleman from Pennsylvanian came to Phoenix Az with an old photograph of a mounted Sheriffs Posse on top of a hill just east of Phoenix International Raceway. He wanted to take a picture of that spot. That day was like any other day, I was Coyote hunting to the west a few miles and to me it wasn’t really hot, around 94 degrees with low humidity, a slight wind and sunny. I got the call and responded. Upon arrival and as normal, the Search Coordinator would hold me back at the Command Post to assist and to respond with my ATV like a Jet Fighter would on Ready Alert. When it started to get dark, the clouds rolled and the wind picked up blowing hard. The tracking team was hot on his trail and the helicopter Ranger 1 could no longer assist due to the high wind. An hour or so later that night, they found him and I responded. Upon breaking thru the thick tumbleweeds and brush, my headlights fail upon him just 15 feet away. He was under a bush in a kind of fetal position. His skin was a burnt brown and where the t-shirt protected his skin was bleach white and his body was badly swollen. We believe that He died from exposure. That day I remember it; all he had on was a pair on tennis shoes, blue jeans, a t-shirt and a ball cap. He was high enough to clearly see roads and power lines to the north and behind him just half mile or less to the south starts a very steep mountain range. The chance of being lost?My Humble Condolences to His Family and FriendsA special thanks to the Maricopa Sheriffs Department

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from Tom Obuhanych wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Aw shucks Dave, I just turn on my GPS! Never lost that way.Best Regards,Tom

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from Wayne wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Humping an axe around may not be the best weight per usage scale, however several different kinds of fire starter located in different places, pockets pack ect. is very wise. A piece of hacksaw blade works great on a magesium strip. A small tube of vaseline will let you use a piece of cloth of anykind for a starter.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

JoeI worked with MCSO for 4 years and there tired of footing the bill for stupidity! People running around signs that read road closed. They still try to cross-flooded washes. One guy said he can make it just fine in his mini pickup. A moment later we watched a large tree disappear where the road was. He changed his mind, he did! A teenager at a Guns N Roses Concert tried to cross the flooded Salt River. Never made it, they found him down stream several days later.I don’t mind dealing with stupid people, just the ones that abuse the privilege!

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from Eric wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Clay,No I have never reached had my lighters fail. Matches I carry a lot of so if I break a tip it is no big deal. As far as cold weather goes, you simply keep your lighter in your pocket and it stays warm and it will work. One more thing you have never had to go look for anyone like me.Matches and lighter, tried and proven.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

solar power?Didn't see the sun for 8 days!

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from Joe wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

I have friends that got lost north of Phoenix near a place called Seven Springs, and when it got dark they called 911. 911 dispatched Maricopa County Sheriff's office helicopter. Helicopter picked them up about 3 miles from their cars. MCSO then charged them about $700 each for cost of helicopter and crew.By the way, temp that night might have dropped to low 60s (it's Phoenix for cryin out loud), and there are no real threats other than dehydration, which is pretty unlikely with the sun down. Idiots. If you can't spend the night in the desert you shouldn't hike.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

In Alaska, the best and most proven Brown Bear protection is a 22 pistol and a pair of tennis shoes.Yes it really works!When the Bear charges you shoot your partner in the ankle and while he is holding his leg kicking around like a roach and screaming, you run like hell!

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from Tony O wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

the way i figure it is you should first figure out where your going to be at in the first place. thats why god gave us maps people. next you should try to carry one with you and a compass. or a gps if your into that sort of thing. or better yet. both. i seen a thing from japan that recharges batteries with solar power. figure it out people. lost is only a state of mind. if you try to sit down and figure it out you might just get somewhere.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

#5 Alaska guide has a point. You’re in survival mode. Your cold, hypothermia is setting in, your exhausted, hungry, all of this causing you not to think clearly and you loose your ability to do things. Self-induced injury is eminent and possible death due to environment and/or self inflected harm!

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Besides, if you’re a smoker, lighter and matches used in your survival kit will be missing! How many times have you been in the woods and have someone ask you for a light?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Hey JackNotice the questions from Eric and Mike. I wished I had a dollar for every time the State Police and the Sheriffs Dept called me at 2am to go and look for people like this.And when I was in Alaska, O’BROTHER! Do I really want to go there?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 33 weeks ago

Mike, you ask, what do you use as a striker for your magnesium stick?If you had one you will find a striker bar on the side of the stick and you use a metal object like your knife.Eric You say, I can't believe I just read someone calling matches and a lighter a joke. Have you ever reached into your backpack and find that your lighter doesn’t work and your matches don’t light? I have!Matches deteriorate with age, don’t light when wet and last only a moment. Lighters leak, bust easily, freeze up in cold weather and don’t work in the wind. One 2x2 impregnated with Vaseline and wrapped around a key or stick lasts up to 7 minutes. Try that with a match!Magnesium stick and Vaseline, tried and proven!

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from Eric wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I can't believe I just read someone calling matches and a lighter a joke.

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from Mike wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Hey Clay Cooper-What do you use as a striker for your magnesium stick"Hey Richard Grimes-What are your 12-plus essentials?

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from jack wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I suppose the Alaska guide in #5 was tired of saving the "once a year outdoorsmen" from the city. Too bad he has to assume that since a few careless klutzes ruined a trip, all must pay for their cluelessness.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The Bible is a great idea. Those thin pages would make great kindling.Seriously, I'd rather pack a first aid or edible plants book.As far as the bow and drill:"What's 20 or 30 minutes when geographicaly challenged". It will take that long to find and prepare the pieces for the whole thing at least. And 20 or 30 minutes is critical when you are freezing to death. It's a good skill to know and does give one a sense of accomplishment, but that new Swedish military issue "Scout" firestarter or a magnesium firestarter with some cottonballs soak in vaseline or lint from your dryer, along with waterproof matches in a waterproof container will be nice to have when you are in danger of losing fingertips to cold.I too have a large library of survival books, edible plant and first aid books, etc. But there really is no substitute for taking a good course from an instructor.

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from Blue Ox wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

If you wanna use a folding saw, that's fine. Won't knock ya for it. But I was born with a Gransfors in my hand.

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from Matt in MN wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with Nomen. A folding saw may the "safest" way to go, but if you can't operate a hatchet, perhaps you should be photographing wilflife instead of hutning with a firearm. Come on people.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The biggest joke I see is someone spending time and money buying or making waxed tip matches, a bic lighter or some oddball fire starting system that has a shelf life and it’s useless when you need it or doesn’t live up to your expatiations. If you want a 100% fire starting system you only need two items. A magnesium fire starter and a bottle of Vaseline. Totally water proof! Yep, you guessed it, if your going to get screwed being lost you might as well make the best of it. To use the bottle of Vaseline, first you need a piece of cloth. A 2”x2”gun cleaning patch works great. Lay the cloth flat on a surface and apply enough Vaseline onto the cloth to saturate it. Then shave off a small amount of magnesium on to the patch. Not much just a pinch will do. Now use the striker to light it. You now have about 5-7 minutes of flame. Also you can use the Vaseline as a first aid cream.Far as cutting wood, I use a folding saw.Old saying goes?Keep It Simple Stupid! (KISS)On more thing from the Coop. If you think your lost, just set down and listen. Chances are you will hear a vehicle in the distance. The 3 O’clock rule? If the Owls hooting and the Coyotes are singing, then you’re in big trouble. At 3 you better have a solid plan and know what direction to be headed back. And by the way, if you had a GPS and plenty of batteries, you just might be back in time for chow!And for you folks that like to carry Iodine pills for drinking water purification, you better make damn sure that your not allergic to the stuff.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, you crack me up!Hope those Longjohns were synthetic so they won't rot soon and continue be a beacon for years to come!I had hunted remote areas solo for many years until I had an out of body experience in Montana a few years ago. I was north of Yellowstone way up the Boulder drainage on a cold day. After not seeing shooter deer or elk for several hours, I hiked back to my truck to some lukewarm coffee and a nap. It had been spitting a few snowflakes, but nothing much in additional accumulation. I started the truck and reclined the seat and dozed off for about an hour. I awoke to my truck covered with inches of snow and snowing harder all the while. I got out and cleared the windows with my snow brush and contempleted my options. I decided to eat my lunch and then head down to the main road. I dozed off for a few minutes and then got out of the truck to relieve myself. I almost took a "spinchter vacation" when I saw huge bear tracks in the snow 3 feet from my door! They weren't there 30 minutes prior, else they would have been snow filled. I had assumed the bears were taking their big nap since it was late October.When it came to me that not one soul knew where I was and no one was likely to come up there for days, I quickly decided to get down to town and regroup.I'll never hunt alone that far back or without a plan left with friends or family.

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from Phillip wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

All those fellas wanting to start a signal fire, better be aware of where you are before you do so... unless you want to bake yourself to a crispy black husk.Big fire in southern CA (was it year before last?) was started by some yo-yo hunter who was "lost". Many thousand acres later the idiot realized the error of his ways.Most of the west, during most of the hunting season, is no place to be setting fires.Back up a couple of posts to the discussion of GPS and compass use. And if you're real concerned, have a look at the Personal Locator Beacon, or at least a satellite phone.I understand the over-stated resistance to high-technology (although that seems to belie the huge industry in computer-generated camo, scent-blocker clothing, and super-duper-Hubble rifle scopes)... but not all technology is bad, and taking advantage of certain safety equipment only makes good sense...it doesn't make anyone less of an outdoorsman.

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from jarrod allen wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I have a 1946 win-70 .35 rem very nice E-mail me soon at turboterriers@netzero.net

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from John wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Buy this book, it is the best survival manual I have EVER read, and I've read almost all of them:98.6 Degrees. The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive.You'll thank me!

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I guess you could say what happens in the U.P. stays in the U.P. ehy!

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Oh my, thats really funny

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from Dave Petzal wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

To Joe Nordin: That story was told me by my old friend Norm Nelson, who hunted the UP with his family from the 40s through the 70s. One year, they invited a guest who had never hunted before and posted him a couple of miles from the cabin on a bitter cold morning with a stern warning not to leave his spot; they would come by and pick him up in a few hours.But time went by and he got cold and tried to find his way back and sure enough, he got lost. When the realization sunk in, his sphincter went on vacation, and he took off his longjohns and hung them in a tree.By a miracle he found a logging road, and a logging truck found him and got him back to civilization, but the longjohns stayed in the tree and became a landmark."I'll meet you by the s****y longjohns at 11."

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from Nomen Nescio wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

folding saws are nice, and might very well give more results for your effort (and their size and weight!) than axes do. but even so...has it really got to the point where today's hunters and outdoorsmen just *can't* use an axe or hatchet safely? i thought i saw that skill discussed at great length in a "traditional scouting" resource not long ago. it was suggested this be taught to pre-teenage boys, for goodness sakes. now i'm being told grown men who want to spend time in the Alaskan wilds can't do it? even if a folding saw might make better sense, this still seems a sad kind of skill to be lacking.

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from willy wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Keep calm, keep warm, be smart. Bow drills are interesting, I guess. A few strike-anywhere matches with the head dipped in fingernail polish and stored in a plastic film canister, along with a small chunk of a fire-starter log will get your fire going, and takes up almost no room in your daypack.

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from Richard Grimes wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave,Excellent post. I teach basic outdoor survival to 5th graders in my area. It revolves around three things. Stay put, have a large trash bag and have a whistle.With STAY PUT being #1.I can appreciate the people who add items to your list. We all have our own checklist. I call mine the 12 essentials and it has evolved for 40 years (and it's more than 12 things now too).To the nay says, at least pack a Bible, God will give you mercy, Mother Nature does not give a damn about you!RG

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from Guess Who wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

David, I truly believe that you should have avoided this topic.When it comes to survival, The Gun Nut is not the sharpest knife in the drawer.

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from Mike Strehlow wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

In the old days, you were told that if you were ever really lost, and I mean lost in the sense that you will be frozen coyote chow if you don't do something soon, you should just find a dry dead tree (hopefully in a clearing) and set it on fire. You'll have to drag up a lot of brush and kindling around the tree to get it going, but hey, that's why God put it there. There are rangers in towers whose jobs it is to spot burning trees, and after they have come and put out the fire, you can hitch a ride home on their truck. If they are mad at you for lighting the fire, tell them they can bill you.In these politically correct days, this suggestion will be as appealing as clubbing baby seals in hopes that their dying squeals will summon help, but you know the old saying; "It is better to be tried by twelve than it is to be frozen coyote chow."

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from Dave in St Pete wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

8. Don't worry about dying. Worry about how you're going to pay for the rescue when they find your foolish self.Please feel free to post ANY info on jackass hikers that have been charged!I'm not against this practice, I would just like to see it applied across the board.

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Another little factoid. It’s not how in shape you are, it’s all mental. Why do kids last longer than adults? They are not thinking of giving up!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

If you think your lost, S.T.O.P.!S- is for Stop!T- is for Think!O- is for Organize!P- is for Plan!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I assisted in teaching a lot of search and rescue courses. I always say, two items are a must! A magnesium fire starter and a bottle of Vaseline. Totally water proof! Yep, you guessed it, if your going to get screwed being lost you might as well make the best of it. To use the bottle of Vaseline, first you need a piece of cloth. A 2”x2”gun cleaning patch works great. Lay the cloth flat on a surface and apply enough Vaseline onto the cloth to saturate it. Then shave off a small amount of magnesium on to the patch. Not much just a pinch will do. Now use the striker to light it. You now have about 5-7 minutes of flame. Also you can use the Vaseline as a first aid cream.

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from Brian wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Matt:I'm a pyrotechnician. I carry all kinds of amusing ways to make fire.For hunting, the best for me is a bar of magnesium with a strip of built-in spark metal. Nothing to break and nothing damaged by water. All the same, it took numerous practice sessions to make it look easy. I'd take some pride in going out into my back yard with only a knife and start a fire with a bowdrill. What's 20-30 minutes when you're "geographically challenged?" Our hunting seasons are pretty much over by the time the really bad mountain WX sets in.

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from Joe Nordin wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, whereabouts in the U.P. did the guy soil his skivvies? Do you do much hunting there?

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from Visitor wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I Don’t Know But I Been ToldTEEEENNNNN-HUT! Face front, you maggots! You’re not back home in Squirrelcrap Junction sipping sodie pops with Bobbie Jo Miniskirt! When you put on that uniform, you stepped into hell – MY hell! And if you disgrace that uniform, so help me I’ll disgrace your behind with my steel-cap boot! Stop crying for mommy! I’m your mommy now, and your daddy, and LBJ and Satan and the furious fist of God himself! And I’ll tell you a little secret: you twinkle-toed turds make me sick to my stomach! You’re about as useless as a diabetic at a pie-eating contest! I haven’t seen such a sorry pile of boobs since the last Madonna tour!You think you’re ready for the Lenovo 3000 N Series Core Duo T2350 NoteBook? You think a pack of booger-eating genetic defectives like you could handle the Intel Core Duo processor, 120GB hard drive, and 1GB DDR2 RAM? Don’t make me laugh! Wasting this fine upstanding laptop on you chimpanzees would be like hanging the Mona Lisa in a septic tank! You expect me to put this integrated webcam, built-in Bluetooth, and fingerprint reader in your slimy paws? You wouldn’t know what to do with it! You sniveling snotballs can’t even take a dump without an instruction manual, a mirror, and a prayer! What’s the matter? Does the truth hurt your precious widdle feelings? If you can’t handle a few nasty words, how on Earth would you handle the Lenovo 3000 N Series Core Duo T2350 NoteBook? Now drop and give me $699.99!

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from suburban bushwacker wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

I'm pitching my tent in the 'folding saw' camp.stress, cold, and macho posturing are all known causes of axe-cedents.SBW

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from SilverArrow wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

This article should be printed in the Magazine as a tear out. Should be taught at every hunter safety course.With respect to the 'no hatchet' policy; definitely makes sense. You risk serious injury and use too much energy using an axe or hatchet compared to the benefit from it. A folding saw is best for breaking down firewood if necessary.SA

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from alabamahunter wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The closest to being lost I have been is when me and a buddy were fishing a 60 acre lake in central Florida. We weren't paying attention and it got dark. It was in an orange grove and the truck was parked behind one of the rows of orange trees. We ended up on the wrong side of teh lake and walked around ther lake for an hour before we found the truck. While this dosn't sound very bad you also must remember this lake is infested with snakes and alligators.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

The fire bow and drill is a skill that is not impossible, but does take a lot of practice. My suggestion to to take a course that teaches it rather than learning from a book. After you have done it, you will also appreciate how difficult it is to craft the components just right and make the whole thing work under ideal circumstances, much less when you are cold, hungry, and stressed. Thinking about having to construct a firebow and drill in freezing weather is why I always carry matches and a fire striker and steel.

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from Greg Morris wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Ralph: my cellphone has saved my butt when I was lost, in the dark, with no flashlight and no means of starting a fire. I found my way back to the trail with it's meager light.I figure if you are unable to get by with nothing but a compass, knife and flint, then you shouldn't be that deep in the wilderness anyway.

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from Brian wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Dave, you just can't protect people from their own stupidity. #3 is a skill that goes a long way to undoing the bozo complex. Learn this at home before you need it. I can make fire with flint & steel but I want to learn to make and use a bowdrill. Seen it done, can't be rocket science.

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from jstreet wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Good advice Dave, even for hunters like myself who hunt small properties.I still carry a means to make a fire, a first aid kit, a compass, water,a cell phone (yes I know it won't reach out everywhere), a backup battery charger (from everyready) for the cellphone, and a backup flashlight that you crank for power instead of using batteries.The one thing I always do is tell someone where I am hunting and I leave a note on my truck that says exactly what stand I will be in for the day. If I move, I make a call and tell someone where I am.

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from Matt Mallery wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

As far as #5 goes, if that guide sees my hatchet and decides he will not drop me off, then he can also promptly refund my money. I am not a cub scout, and I can make my own decisions about what gear to bring. Also, what is the logic of letting me have a gun and knife but no axe? This makes zero sense.

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from Walt Smith wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

You might also pay attention to where the sun sets in relation to your campsite/cabin the night before you go afield ,that way if you do have a problem and can see the sun setting you have a goodchance of making it to a familiar landmark or trail and you won't have to spend the night. This is what I did when my compass did a 180 on me in the U.P. I knew that the cabin was in line of where the sun set, not SE where my (U.S. issue) compass was showing. I followed the sunset and within a hour stepped out on one of our trails. Might not for everyone but it worked for me.

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from PbHead wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

Good advice Dave. I especially like #10. Make sure you have a will specifically dividing up your firearms among friends, relatives or guys like me. That should help slow down the fist fights at the funeral.

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from Evan wrote 6 years 34 weeks ago

sounds like good advice to me.

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from ravenscar wrote 4 years 44 weeks ago

i was talkin to a hunter fisher guy and he told me i shouldnt listen to heave metal will fishin or huntin cause it scare off everything even if its on volume 8 as i always listen to it .is this true?

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I carry a small jar of Vaseline® Petroleum Jelly which is a mixture of mineral oils, paraffin and microcrystalline waxes. As some of you know Vaseline® has more uses that WD40. After cleaning the wound, use a small amount to coat the wound then cover the area. This keeps out and lets out the bad stuff also to keep the wound moist.

Vaseline® and magnesium stick is my primary fire starter rather than water proof matches. A 2x2 cotton patch saturated will burn 6 to 10 minutes.

In addition, extra batteries, GI compass and of course the Sharman’s!

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from Scott Bashaw wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

chuck the best shot placement before the charging brown bear gets to you is right under your chin and pray your dead before you hit the ground,....hahaha,...kidding
this is a great question,....surprised no experts answerd

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