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The 50 Best Field & Stream Reader Photos from July 2012

The 50 Best Field & Stream Reader Photos from July 2012

Thresher Shark

Comments (22)

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from LostLure wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Awsome timing on that pic, and congrats on the first pheasant.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Pictures of dead sharks with a bunch of losers standing around it don't impress me.

Pictures of a shark beside the boat after a great fight being released to reproduce and be caught again impress me.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Pictures of dead sharks with a bunch of losers standing around it don't impress me.

Pictures of a shark beside the boat after a great fight being released to reproduce and be caught again impress me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

FlyAngler, I don't see the trill of killing big sharks, marlin, sailfish, and all the rest. The oceans are vast but there is an end to the supply. Just look at the blue fin tuna!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Field and Stream is a hunting, fishing and trapping website.
The website is filled with hunting photos of bagged animals, fish caught by fishermen and animals that were trapped. If anyone gets upset or offended over a fish or an animal that was killed, then maybe you might consider going on the Humane Society, Friends of Animals or Peta's website. You never find anything dead on those websites.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Juan Jose Serra wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Why enjoying killing those magnificent fish? Guys, you can practice C&R taking picts during the fisght and with the fish releasing. The fish can spawn again. I'm not PETA, just a fisher that always practice C&R with wild fish. Good fishing.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bruce Christensen wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

People gotta put food on the table on way or another.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I didn't say it wasn't a thrill catching them, my problem is with killing them all the time. There's a difference Gary and it is still fishing for sport.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackjac wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Want to tell us us what you did with your great catch after the macho pix?
You all look like what sport fishing are NOT--my opinion.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Timothy Hayes wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Field and Stream is for sportsmen, people who take pride in the outdoors and appreciate what it has to offer. Landing a large fish and then releasing it to fight another day is what a sportsman does. A large dead shark, with no food value, hanging on a dock rotting might look impressive to some but where I come from we learned long ago that releasing tarpon to fight again maintains the species for future generations. You enjoy the thrill of the fight; get the pictures along the side of the boat; and then watch in wonder as the trophy fish slips back into the deep to fight again another day. Now that's a satisfying feeling!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from whiteeagle wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I'm a shark fisherman (among other things) from Long Island, New York--just where this fish was caught--and agree with the folks who say that it's a shame that the big thresher was killed. 20 years ago, I would have been thrilled to kill that fish; a little more than a decade ago, I would have killed it in a tournament context. But with one very limited exception--threshers are the hardest-fighting shark out there, and sometimes exhaust themselves so badly that they all but die on the line, and in such cases likely won't survive if released--the big fish didn't have to be killed. Unlike what was said in a previous comment, threshers aren't without food value; they're arguably the best tasting shark out there. But the meat from the larger fish tends to get coarse, and in any case, a thresher of nearly 600 pounds produces a lot of meat that one needs to either consume or give away. I could be wrong, but I'm betting that, intentionally or as a result of age and freezer burn, a lot of this fish will end up in the garbage. And that's just wrong.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

It should have been released. The days of killing these great fish should be long gone and can no longer be justified, if they ever COULD be justified. We've done it to ourselves. The "sporting" part is over when the fish is brought to the boat, but then killing it diminishes the whole thing.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eric Himmelreich wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Hey Guys, Keeping fish that are apex predators is not a good idea. It is also good fodder for anyone who wants to criticize our privilige of fishing. A long fight with a beautiful fish like this is what we all want so why not let these big fish go so it can reproduce and we all can have a chance at landing a big one. The rule that we all learned in kindergarden about sharing applies to all of our experiences in the great outdoors!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kristofur18 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Just for the record, with all the negativity...
We DID release A LOT of other sharks that day & that shark WAS eaten by multiple families. We would never kill anything without intentions of eating. The only fish that stay on the boat are fish that are planned to be eaten; just because we choose to get ours from the sea & not the supermarket doesn't make it too diffferent.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Kristofur18,
Great job for eating and sharing the shark's meat with all your family and friends. Your right there was a lot of negativity toward your thresher shark. I was starting to think threshers were going extinct or something. There were many other fishing photos in that group of 49 that were picked by the Editors.
Not one negative word, on the carp that was killed with an arrow, the large bass away from the shore line, the Alaska halibut on the cutting board table and the large catfish at night on land.
Is the life of a threaher shark more important then the lives of all the other fish that were not "caught and release, to fight another day"?
I guess like they say, you being photo number one, everybody is going to take shots at you. Great Job to all you guys in the photo and Congrats on your great trophy shark!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gator7777 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Nice shark! I am sure it tasted real good. Isn't that they way its suppose to be? Or should we all be vegetarians? Id rather hunt and fish for my food like its been done for thousands of years. If something is endagered that would be one thing in which we would all agree but if its not it should be the choice of the individual fishing or hunting.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from area_code_860 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I know that spot in pic 3. I was just there a week ago. Nice catch

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from small game sportsman wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

nice shark, man

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Deb Jeffrey Freele wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

There's nothing uglier than a photo of a dead trophy fish or shark. I don't want to see that. Show me photos of these magnificent animals being released instead. Sharks can use the break!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RalphReid wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Nice catch and glad to hear it became food.
I need to tell you guys what my Daddy and Grandpappy taught me about hunting and fishing. Unless there is some compelling reason for destroying an animal, like a rogue gator, IF YOU KILL IT, YOU EAT IT. This all reminds me of the shark fishing tournament in St. Augustine, Florida several years ago. These guys caught a whopper and towed it in by the tail. They hung it on the scales where it stayed until a few minutes before the entry deadline when this boat comes in with another whopper towed in by the head. They strung it up, waited for all of the water to drain out and scored the weight. It was the larger by a very few pounds. The trophy and cash were awarded and the kegs were tapped. As the second round was being drawn there was a loud clunk heard from the scales. Everyone turned to see a turtle's head that fell from the mouth of the winning shark, which was now a half pound lighter than the second place shark. Laughter came from everywhere, except one table.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GrandSlamDreamer wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Many of the people who have posted against killing sharks and big fish already probably will not come back to read this, but I will share this anyway. I agree that it is not always the right answer to kill a trophy fish. In fact most guides today will through back monster fish anyway. But unless you know that the fish in the picture is going to be thrown away you really don't have the right to say otherwise. I was fishing in St. Thomas a couple of years ago when my dad caught a monster Mahi Mahi. We thought we were going to throw it back when the guide asked if we minded if he kept it. One the ride back to the dock that evening he explained that he cuts up the fish and uses it as a means of trade with some of the locals for vegetables and other things. He also eats a lot of the meat himself. It is hard to know what someone's situation is and perhaps it would be good to take that into consideration before attacking what could be the fondest fishing memory of someone's life.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bassinbick wrote 1 year 31 weeks ago

sweet

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Field and Stream is a hunting, fishing and trapping website.
The website is filled with hunting photos of bagged animals, fish caught by fishermen and animals that were trapped. If anyone gets upset or offended over a fish or an animal that was killed, then maybe you might consider going on the Humane Society, Friends of Animals or Peta's website. You never find anything dead on those websites.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

FlyAngler, I don't see the trill of killing big sharks, marlin, sailfish, and all the rest. The oceans are vast but there is an end to the supply. Just look at the blue fin tuna!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Timothy Hayes wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Field and Stream is for sportsmen, people who take pride in the outdoors and appreciate what it has to offer. Landing a large fish and then releasing it to fight another day is what a sportsman does. A large dead shark, with no food value, hanging on a dock rotting might look impressive to some but where I come from we learned long ago that releasing tarpon to fight again maintains the species for future generations. You enjoy the thrill of the fight; get the pictures along the side of the boat; and then watch in wonder as the trophy fish slips back into the deep to fight again another day. Now that's a satisfying feeling!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Juan Jose Serra wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Why enjoying killing those magnificent fish? Guys, you can practice C&R taking picts during the fisght and with the fish releasing. The fish can spawn again. I'm not PETA, just a fisher that always practice C&R with wild fish. Good fishing.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from whiteeagle wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I'm a shark fisherman (among other things) from Long Island, New York--just where this fish was caught--and agree with the folks who say that it's a shame that the big thresher was killed. 20 years ago, I would have been thrilled to kill that fish; a little more than a decade ago, I would have killed it in a tournament context. But with one very limited exception--threshers are the hardest-fighting shark out there, and sometimes exhaust themselves so badly that they all but die on the line, and in such cases likely won't survive if released--the big fish didn't have to be killed. Unlike what was said in a previous comment, threshers aren't without food value; they're arguably the best tasting shark out there. But the meat from the larger fish tends to get coarse, and in any case, a thresher of nearly 600 pounds produces a lot of meat that one needs to either consume or give away. I could be wrong, but I'm betting that, intentionally or as a result of age and freezer burn, a lot of this fish will end up in the garbage. And that's just wrong.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Pictures of dead sharks with a bunch of losers standing around it don't impress me.

Pictures of a shark beside the boat after a great fight being released to reproduce and be caught again impress me.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

It should have been released. The days of killing these great fish should be long gone and can no longer be justified, if they ever COULD be justified. We've done it to ourselves. The "sporting" part is over when the fish is brought to the boat, but then killing it diminishes the whole thing.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kristofur18 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Just for the record, with all the negativity...
We DID release A LOT of other sharks that day & that shark WAS eaten by multiple families. We would never kill anything without intentions of eating. The only fish that stay on the boat are fish that are planned to be eaten; just because we choose to get ours from the sea & not the supermarket doesn't make it too diffferent.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from LostLure wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Awsome timing on that pic, and congrats on the first pheasant.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I didn't say it wasn't a thrill catching them, my problem is with killing them all the time. There's a difference Gary and it is still fishing for sport.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eric Himmelreich wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Hey Guys, Keeping fish that are apex predators is not a good idea. It is also good fodder for anyone who wants to criticize our privilige of fishing. A long fight with a beautiful fish like this is what we all want so why not let these big fish go so it can reproduce and we all can have a chance at landing a big one. The rule that we all learned in kindergarden about sharing applies to all of our experiences in the great outdoors!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Kristofur18,
Great job for eating and sharing the shark's meat with all your family and friends. Your right there was a lot of negativity toward your thresher shark. I was starting to think threshers were going extinct or something. There were many other fishing photos in that group of 49 that were picked by the Editors.
Not one negative word, on the carp that was killed with an arrow, the large bass away from the shore line, the Alaska halibut on the cutting board table and the large catfish at night on land.
Is the life of a threaher shark more important then the lives of all the other fish that were not "caught and release, to fight another day"?
I guess like they say, you being photo number one, everybody is going to take shots at you. Great Job to all you guys in the photo and Congrats on your great trophy shark!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Deb Jeffrey Freele wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

There's nothing uglier than a photo of a dead trophy fish or shark. I don't want to see that. Show me photos of these magnificent animals being released instead. Sharks can use the break!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Pictures of dead sharks with a bunch of losers standing around it don't impress me.

Pictures of a shark beside the boat after a great fight being released to reproduce and be caught again impress me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackjac wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Want to tell us us what you did with your great catch after the macho pix?
You all look like what sport fishing are NOT--my opinion.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from area_code_860 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I know that spot in pic 3. I was just there a week ago. Nice catch

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from small game sportsman wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

nice shark, man

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RalphReid wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Nice catch and glad to hear it became food.
I need to tell you guys what my Daddy and Grandpappy taught me about hunting and fishing. Unless there is some compelling reason for destroying an animal, like a rogue gator, IF YOU KILL IT, YOU EAT IT. This all reminds me of the shark fishing tournament in St. Augustine, Florida several years ago. These guys caught a whopper and towed it in by the tail. They hung it on the scales where it stayed until a few minutes before the entry deadline when this boat comes in with another whopper towed in by the head. They strung it up, waited for all of the water to drain out and scored the weight. It was the larger by a very few pounds. The trophy and cash were awarded and the kegs were tapped. As the second round was being drawn there was a loud clunk heard from the scales. Everyone turned to see a turtle's head that fell from the mouth of the winning shark, which was now a half pound lighter than the second place shark. Laughter came from everywhere, except one table.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GrandSlamDreamer wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Many of the people who have posted against killing sharks and big fish already probably will not come back to read this, but I will share this anyway. I agree that it is not always the right answer to kill a trophy fish. In fact most guides today will through back monster fish anyway. But unless you know that the fish in the picture is going to be thrown away you really don't have the right to say otherwise. I was fishing in St. Thomas a couple of years ago when my dad caught a monster Mahi Mahi. We thought we were going to throw it back when the guide asked if we minded if he kept it. One the ride back to the dock that evening he explained that he cuts up the fish and uses it as a means of trade with some of the locals for vegetables and other things. He also eats a lot of the meat himself. It is hard to know what someone's situation is and perhaps it would be good to take that into consideration before attacking what could be the fondest fishing memory of someone's life.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bassinbick wrote 1 year 31 weeks ago

sweet

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bruce Christensen wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

People gotta put food on the table on way or another.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gator7777 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Nice shark! I am sure it tasted real good. Isn't that they way its suppose to be? Or should we all be vegetarians? Id rather hunt and fish for my food like its been done for thousands of years. If something is endagered that would be one thing in which we would all agree but if its not it should be the choice of the individual fishing or hunting.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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Additional Info

Each month, Field & Stream editors review the hundreds of photos submitted by readers to our Trophy Room. If your photo is chosen to be printed in the Game Faces section of the magazine, you’ll win a Rapala Fish ‘N Fillet knife!

Submit your photos here!

More reader photo collections from this year: 
January 2012

February 2012
March 2012
April 2012
May 2012
June 2012