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A Beginner’s Guide to Finding and Cooking Morel Mushrooms

A Beginner’s Guide to Finding and Cooking Morel Mushrooms

morels_01

Comments (48)

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from jay wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

We call the the half morels peckerheads here in S. Illinois. I know plenty of guys that eat them.

My grandpa used to eat the red morels. I never saw him without a wiskey bottle in his hand so even though the red morels are toxic it was probably not doing any more harm that the Jim Beam he was living on.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Beautiful photo. I used to pick morels for money in the aftermath of the big Montana fires- in the summer of 2001, other than writing, I think that's the only way I made any money. It was big fun, out for a week or more at a time, roaming the ash and traveling the wildest places, seeing the strangest things revealed by the fire. Haggling pound prices at night, in the rowdy mushroom camps down by Highway 93 in the Bitterroots. Sell a few pounds for gas, food and beer, dry the rest on tarps for sale later. Shining times, indeed.

I still love to pick them, especially with my children in on the hunt- a kind of wild Easter Egg hunt, way out on the country. We dry them on tarps, keep some to eat with elk steaks, give a lot away to friends and relatives for Christmas.
The bounty of the earth, brought to hand.

Hal

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Great article and photos. We call the half morels peckerheads here in Mo. too. I know several folks who eat em, and I've tried a few when they're real fresh. Not bad. The red one folks call 'beefsteak" mushrooms around here, and they eat em' just as feverishly as morels.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tmac49 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I find morels about like I find sheds, not very well at all. But morels with eggs sounds good. Excellent article&photos!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rem700-06 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I've never had morels, I usually keep to Puffballs.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

They look pretty funny looking, compared to other mushrooms. I wonder if they taste the same... I would not mind getting my hands on some if I can find them. Which makes me wonder... do they even grow in Florida?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ranger2 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Well said Hal. Your post brought a lot of memories- just over the hill on the Idaho side were my stomping grounds. I brought my kids out for the first time this year...the bounty of the earth indeed!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from OutdoorMan wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Good article. I would also recommend hunting around popular trees and going after a rain. The rain lowers the forest floor allowing you to spot the morels much easier. The larger ones tend to stick out and can be seen from a distance.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I love morels and peckerheads but if you don't know the difference in mushrooms an easy way to tell, an edible mushroom should be dissected in half, vertically. The stem and the cap should be 'one'. One is part of the other. If a cap sits on top of the stem do not eat it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Liotus212 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Anybody have any tips for preserving morels for a little? Because I always find a few here and there, but usually do not have enough for a meal until I've been out in the woods a few times. Let me know if anyone's had luck keeping them fresh..

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from t_holinka wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My plan to keep them fresh longer is to use my vacuum sealer, or freeze them in a cookie sheet hten package them in a freezer bag. I'm super excited to look for morels. I go turkey hunting on wednesday and you bet I'll have a bag for morels.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Mushrooms scare me to death. You take a big risk "testing" them by eating a small amount, as they can kill you in a "delayed reaction" way of several days.

I figure I would never eat any unless someone expert could verify they are good to eat.

I have to admit these look very distinctive.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckshot89 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

fudd, the good thing about morelles is that nothing really looks like them. even the red one showed in the photos doesn't look like the actual thing. ive found they are the tastiest when dipped in egg then rolled in ritz cracker crumbs then pan fried. good eatin

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My wife used to hunt them with her Dad when she was a little girl. The called them "Molly Moochers"... must be a West Virginia coal fields thing.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

what's the thing about red ones being toxic?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Fudd, that would be picture #3

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jkeller wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Starting in March our whole family can't wait to go morel hunting. Our daughters and son love to go. We always find more than we can eat in one sitting. We have always froze them and they taste almost as good as just finding them. HAPPY MOREL HUNTING EVERYONE!!!!! Take your kids out, I assure you they will have a blast looking for these.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I could have found more this year but I lost my deocys in the woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Broil four elk or deer backstrap steaks in a good frying pan greased with olive oil. Take them out while they are still kind of rare, because they keep on cooking. Now, put some butter or more olive oil in the pan with the steak juices, crumble up your morels, fresh or dried, into the oil or butter, let them brown a little bit, throw in a little salt, then cover it all with a half inch or so of hot water and let it boil down to a gravy. You can thicken it with cornstarch or flour if you want to. Lay the steaks on some sliced bread and pour the whole mess of gravy and morels over them.

That's how we like to eat them.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I guessed wrong on how to pronounce it.

Check it out:

http://tinyurl.com/cnrq5z

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Can't wait to go find some. I am taking the kids this weekend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shootlikeawoman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I love morels, though I've never found any in the wild. Thanks for the great suggestions about where to look!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RandyT62048 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Hello from Hartford,IL.
My family go out EVERY year and find atlest 10lbs. We get so many that I sell them from the side of my road.This year I was selling them for $25 a lb.
I usally the the fever around January.There is also a Morel website that people give tips and sorta locations where to find them.www.morels.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My bro in law got over 25 lbs, my wife "Blanches" them in a deep fat fryer with flour and seals them with a sealer, we eat on them all through the year!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sledgehammer wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Morels are great and for those who can't find them, check out this web site, www.Teammorel.com you can order right from them if you so desire!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard G. wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Very good article and pictures.

Thank you!

RG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard G. wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Love, Fight, WAR, Councel, Divorce, Peace!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robertou812 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

If your intrested go to the verious sites on the web to be sure of what you harvest. Hard core shroomers will always use the latin names for the verious toxic mushrooms. As jbird pointed out some people eat beefsteak shrooms, not the one pictured above that one will fix your wagon for good!

Morels are closer to the yeast family the stem and top are not seprate if you cut one from top to bottom the head and stem are one continuous body (no seprate cap single chamber)good to do any way to debug. Soak them in salt solution to help debug then return the spores in the salt water solution to the place you picked them from via mister bottle set to squirt. Spray the area for next year.

P.S it's considered a social fopas to ask some one where his spot is

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My family always goes out a few times a year, especially while turkey hunting. We just frie em up and bread them with flour. Yum!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My family always goes out a few times a year, especially while turkey hunting. We just frie em up and bread them with flour. Yum!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from danahuntress wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Here in MI, they're going for $30-48/lb. We think they're too good to sell. We fry them in butter & this year we're going to try & dry them for use throughout the year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mstracyj01 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

When I was a little girl my dad used to bring home Morels the way he preserved them was to string them up with a needle and thread and let them dry. When it was time and we were going to eat them he'd soak them in salt water. They'd puff back up just as if freash. Now as a modern day lady I use my dehydrater and store them in plastic bags or an air tight container.. both methods work!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Thomas Murray wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I dry them for a few hours in the dehydrator, then thread them with a needle and thread. I've kept them for months, and rehydrated in a little milk and butter gently simmered on the stove.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dakota.Woman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Mm-mm-morels! I once found some growing in a bed of daylilies & irises next to my house! Nowadays, you can buy a kit & grow your own if you're really desparate.. then again, you'd have them any time of year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I am going to have to try these. I love portabelos, and these sound really good. I just hope I can find some, in the woods or the store.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from j-johnson17 wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Those look tasty... I've never gone mushroom hunting but I know a number of people that do it. I'd like to go one time and see what it is like. It sounds like a good time to me!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sledneck7 wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Are Morels rare in New york state? I found one the other day and I have never heard of them existing around where I live in CNY.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamieSue wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

I just bought a kit. I am going to try to grow them. I used to hunt them all the time as a kid in Indiana, but in Tennessee I am having trouble getting into an overgrown woods or knowing where to go, so I will let you know how they are. Also, my mother just a couple of weeks ago froze them like this: She soaked them in water and salt for a few hours, rinsed them off, and let them completely drip dry in the refrigerator from a colander into a bowl, placed on paper towels, then rolled them in flour, froze on cookie sheets and put in freezer bags. You cannot tell they are not fresh when they are fried. Fabulous.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coachwcs wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Morels cooked in a cast iron skillet with butter and onions, are great to top a steak off with!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from t_holinka wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

I just picked some on the river bottoms of the missippi river in southwest wisconsin it was delish.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ganderposterboy wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Hey t_holinka grew up in Potosi area hunted morels all the time when i was a kid. Went out with my Grandpa and brothers and sisters all the time. One thing my grandpa told me was to shake or tap lightly the mushroom to release the spores and keep em going.happy hunting..good old potosi beer

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

Great article and pictures....I definitely be watchful of pictures # 3!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 270WSM wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

GREAT ARTICLE. I HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO TRY HUNTING MUSHROOMS BUT HAVE NEVER TAKEN THE TIME. I WILL TRY THIS NEXT SPRING

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from katiemichelle wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

In Ohio I've heard the half-morels called spikes, but more commonly snake heads.
My dad goes out every year to find them. My mom calls herself a 'mushroom widow' because he's almost always in the woods during the season. When he goes out he drops the mushrooms a couple of times to spread the spores, and likes to use a mesh bag to help with that. Then when he gets home he cuts them in half, soaks them in water for a while (then tosses the water in hopes of having a patch at home!), and then after they dry he coats them with shortening and a combination of flour and cornmeal. Apparently they make a good sandwich!
Also, they sell them in the stores around here. Marsh was selling them for $22/pound a few years ago. At Meijer it's about $9.99 for four ounces. Ridiculous! I'd much rather go out to the woods and spend some quality time with my dad.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jac wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Dang it Hal, you've got me drooling all over my keyboard - I can smell 'em and taste 'em....yummmmmyumyummmmy! Good with fresh venison liver or heart too! Gotta stop this or my keyboard is gonna short out......!!!

Jac

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Thanks for the article and the morel photos. Of course, the local mushrooms are Chanterelles and Shiitake. They ain't too bad.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mrsroadrunner wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

This is fantastic!! Informative and very nice photographs!! I was looking for something like this.... We find many mushrooms where we go and I really do not trust them and needed a article like this.
Run upon the giant puffball mushroom and did not even know it was edible, so took the pic and left it alone like I usually do the mushrooms.
Thank you, you did a great job!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert White wrote 2 years 4 weeks ago

love morels and peckerheads, theyre very addicting. a good way to preserve them (the way i do) is a bowl filled with water, add a couple pinches of salt, stir and add the mushrooms. then set in the fridge till you get to eatin em!also kills germs/bacteria!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from jay wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

We call the the half morels peckerheads here in S. Illinois. I know plenty of guys that eat them.

My grandpa used to eat the red morels. I never saw him without a wiskey bottle in his hand so even though the red morels are toxic it was probably not doing any more harm that the Jim Beam he was living on.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Beautiful photo. I used to pick morels for money in the aftermath of the big Montana fires- in the summer of 2001, other than writing, I think that's the only way I made any money. It was big fun, out for a week or more at a time, roaming the ash and traveling the wildest places, seeing the strangest things revealed by the fire. Haggling pound prices at night, in the rowdy mushroom camps down by Highway 93 in the Bitterroots. Sell a few pounds for gas, food and beer, dry the rest on tarps for sale later. Shining times, indeed.

I still love to pick them, especially with my children in on the hunt- a kind of wild Easter Egg hunt, way out on the country. We dry them on tarps, keep some to eat with elk steaks, give a lot away to friends and relatives for Christmas.
The bounty of the earth, brought to hand.

Hal

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Broil four elk or deer backstrap steaks in a good frying pan greased with olive oil. Take them out while they are still kind of rare, because they keep on cooking. Now, put some butter or more olive oil in the pan with the steak juices, crumble up your morels, fresh or dried, into the oil or butter, let them brown a little bit, throw in a little salt, then cover it all with a half inch or so of hot water and let it boil down to a gravy. You can thicken it with cornstarch or flour if you want to. Lay the steaks on some sliced bread and pour the whole mess of gravy and morels over them.

That's how we like to eat them.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I love morels and peckerheads but if you don't know the difference in mushrooms an easy way to tell, an edible mushroom should be dissected in half, vertically. The stem and the cap should be 'one'. One is part of the other. If a cap sits on top of the stem do not eat it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Liotus212 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Anybody have any tips for preserving morels for a little? Because I always find a few here and there, but usually do not have enough for a meal until I've been out in the woods a few times. Let me know if anyone's had luck keeping them fresh..

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My wife used to hunt them with her Dad when she was a little girl. The called them "Molly Moochers"... must be a West Virginia coal fields thing.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jkeller wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Starting in March our whole family can't wait to go morel hunting. Our daughters and son love to go. We always find more than we can eat in one sitting. We have always froze them and they taste almost as good as just finding them. HAPPY MOREL HUNTING EVERYONE!!!!! Take your kids out, I assure you they will have a blast looking for these.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from mstracyj01 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

When I was a little girl my dad used to bring home Morels the way he preserved them was to string them up with a needle and thread and let them dry. When it was time and we were going to eat them he'd soak them in salt water. They'd puff back up just as if freash. Now as a modern day lady I use my dehydrater and store them in plastic bags or an air tight container.. both methods work!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Great article and photos. We call the half morels peckerheads here in Mo. too. I know several folks who eat em, and I've tried a few when they're real fresh. Not bad. The red one folks call 'beefsteak" mushrooms around here, and they eat em' just as feverishly as morels.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tmac49 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I find morels about like I find sheds, not very well at all. But morels with eggs sounds good. Excellent article&photos!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

They look pretty funny looking, compared to other mushrooms. I wonder if they taste the same... I would not mind getting my hands on some if I can find them. Which makes me wonder... do they even grow in Florida?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ranger2 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Well said Hal. Your post brought a lot of memories- just over the hill on the Idaho side were my stomping grounds. I brought my kids out for the first time this year...the bounty of the earth indeed!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from OutdoorMan wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Good article. I would also recommend hunting around popular trees and going after a rain. The rain lowers the forest floor allowing you to spot the morels much easier. The larger ones tend to stick out and can be seen from a distance.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from t_holinka wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My plan to keep them fresh longer is to use my vacuum sealer, or freeze them in a cookie sheet hten package them in a freezer bag. I'm super excited to look for morels. I go turkey hunting on wednesday and you bet I'll have a bag for morels.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Mushrooms scare me to death. You take a big risk "testing" them by eating a small amount, as they can kill you in a "delayed reaction" way of several days.

I figure I would never eat any unless someone expert could verify they are good to eat.

I have to admit these look very distinctive.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckshot89 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

fudd, the good thing about morelles is that nothing really looks like them. even the red one showed in the photos doesn't look like the actual thing. ive found they are the tastiest when dipped in egg then rolled in ritz cracker crumbs then pan fried. good eatin

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

what's the thing about red ones being toxic?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Fudd, that would be picture #3

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I could have found more this year but I lost my deocys in the woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I guessed wrong on how to pronounce it.

Check it out:

http://tinyurl.com/cnrq5z

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Can't wait to go find some. I am taking the kids this weekend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shootlikeawoman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I love morels, though I've never found any in the wild. Thanks for the great suggestions about where to look!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RandyT62048 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Hello from Hartford,IL.
My family go out EVERY year and find atlest 10lbs. We get so many that I sell them from the side of my road.This year I was selling them for $25 a lb.
I usally the the fever around January.There is also a Morel website that people give tips and sorta locations where to find them.www.morels.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robertou812 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

If your intrested go to the verious sites on the web to be sure of what you harvest. Hard core shroomers will always use the latin names for the verious toxic mushrooms. As jbird pointed out some people eat beefsteak shrooms, not the one pictured above that one will fix your wagon for good!

Morels are closer to the yeast family the stem and top are not seprate if you cut one from top to bottom the head and stem are one continuous body (no seprate cap single chamber)good to do any way to debug. Soak them in salt solution to help debug then return the spores in the salt water solution to the place you picked them from via mister bottle set to squirt. Spray the area for next year.

P.S it's considered a social fopas to ask some one where his spot is

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dakota.Woman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Mm-mm-morels! I once found some growing in a bed of daylilies & irises next to my house! Nowadays, you can buy a kit & grow your own if you're really desparate.. then again, you'd have them any time of year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from coachwcs wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Morels cooked in a cast iron skillet with butter and onions, are great to top a steak off with!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

Great article and pictures....I definitely be watchful of pictures # 3!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My bro in law got over 25 lbs, my wife "Blanches" them in a deep fat fryer with flour and seals them with a sealer, we eat on them all through the year!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sledgehammer wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Morels are great and for those who can't find them, check out this web site, www.Teammorel.com you can order right from them if you so desire!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard G. wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Very good article and pictures.

Thank you!

RG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My family always goes out a few times a year, especially while turkey hunting. We just frie em up and bread them with flour. Yum!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My family always goes out a few times a year, especially while turkey hunting. We just frie em up and bread them with flour. Yum!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from danahuntress wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Here in MI, they're going for $30-48/lb. We think they're too good to sell. We fry them in butter & this year we're going to try & dry them for use throughout the year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Thomas Murray wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I dry them for a few hours in the dehydrator, then thread them with a needle and thread. I've kept them for months, and rehydrated in a little milk and butter gently simmered on the stove.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I am going to have to try these. I love portabelos, and these sound really good. I just hope I can find some, in the woods or the store.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from j-johnson17 wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Those look tasty... I've never gone mushroom hunting but I know a number of people that do it. I'd like to go one time and see what it is like. It sounds like a good time to me!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sledneck7 wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

Are Morels rare in New york state? I found one the other day and I have never heard of them existing around where I live in CNY.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamieSue wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

I just bought a kit. I am going to try to grow them. I used to hunt them all the time as a kid in Indiana, but in Tennessee I am having trouble getting into an overgrown woods or knowing where to go, so I will let you know how they are. Also, my mother just a couple of weeks ago froze them like this: She soaked them in water and salt for a few hours, rinsed them off, and let them completely drip dry in the refrigerator from a colander into a bowl, placed on paper towels, then rolled them in flour, froze on cookie sheets and put in freezer bags. You cannot tell they are not fresh when they are fried. Fabulous.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from t_holinka wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

I just picked some on the river bottoms of the missippi river in southwest wisconsin it was delish.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ganderposterboy wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Hey t_holinka grew up in Potosi area hunted morels all the time when i was a kid. Went out with my Grandpa and brothers and sisters all the time. One thing my grandpa told me was to shake or tap lightly the mushroom to release the spores and keep em going.happy hunting..good old potosi beer

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 270WSM wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

GREAT ARTICLE. I HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO TRY HUNTING MUSHROOMS BUT HAVE NEVER TAKEN THE TIME. I WILL TRY THIS NEXT SPRING

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from katiemichelle wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

In Ohio I've heard the half-morels called spikes, but more commonly snake heads.
My dad goes out every year to find them. My mom calls herself a 'mushroom widow' because he's almost always in the woods during the season. When he goes out he drops the mushrooms a couple of times to spread the spores, and likes to use a mesh bag to help with that. Then when he gets home he cuts them in half, soaks them in water for a while (then tosses the water in hopes of having a patch at home!), and then after they dry he coats them with shortening and a combination of flour and cornmeal. Apparently they make a good sandwich!
Also, they sell them in the stores around here. Marsh was selling them for $22/pound a few years ago. At Meijer it's about $9.99 for four ounces. Ridiculous! I'd much rather go out to the woods and spend some quality time with my dad.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jac wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Dang it Hal, you've got me drooling all over my keyboard - I can smell 'em and taste 'em....yummmmmyumyummmmy! Good with fresh venison liver or heart too! Gotta stop this or my keyboard is gonna short out......!!!

Jac

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Thanks for the article and the morel photos. Of course, the local mushrooms are Chanterelles and Shiitake. They ain't too bad.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mrsroadrunner wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

This is fantastic!! Informative and very nice photographs!! I was looking for something like this.... We find many mushrooms where we go and I really do not trust them and needed a article like this.
Run upon the giant puffball mushroom and did not even know it was edible, so took the pic and left it alone like I usually do the mushrooms.
Thank you, you did a great job!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert White wrote 2 years 4 weeks ago

love morels and peckerheads, theyre very addicting. a good way to preserve them (the way i do) is a bowl filled with water, add a couple pinches of salt, stir and add the mushrooms. then set in the fridge till you get to eatin em!also kills germs/bacteria!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rem700-06 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I've never had morels, I usually keep to Puffballs.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Richard G. wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Love, Fight, WAR, Councel, Divorce, Peace!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

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