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Seven Primitive Survival Shelters That Could Save Your Life

Seven Primitive Survival Shelters That Could Save Your Life

How To Make Survival Shelters

Comments (14)

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from Nelsondl wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

I have been interested in this area since I was a teenager, and I am now 57. I have tried various shelters over the decades, from the Sierra to near the Arctic Circle. I think the best thing you can do to provide emergency shelter in a wilderness situation is to be sure you always pack a survival kit when you go into the woods, and include in that kit two or three garbage bags. If you take them directly out of the box they come in and place them into a sandwich bag, then seal it, they will not open up and will stay nicely folded. They take up next to no room and weight nothing. Then, after you have made whatever windbreak or shelter out of whatever is available, you can line it with the garbage bag (slit open into a flat sheet with your knife), and crawl into another bag, to keep the wind off of you. I have done this in a driving rainstorm in Canada. Not comfortable, but survived.

The shelters shown here are not completely waterproof and windproof, unless you take days to construct it, and then it still is porous.

+13 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jesse wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

I think every outdoorsman should have some basic know how to buld a shelter just in case u never know when u could get lost or stranded

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from sere9501 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Some of the shelters in this article are great and will work well in a lot of different situations but a lot will take a good amount of time to construct if you want them done right. That means waterproof and big enough for you and your gear. Like Nelson said you have to have a good Personal Survival Kit (PSK) with you when you are out. That extra five or ten pounds will mean the world to you when you absolutely need it, trust me I've been there and done that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from wally wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

These could come in handy if you are in any type of survival situation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from M Fet wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

This is a must know for outdoorsmen. But one must remember to make the shelter the right size. A shelter to large will lose all important body heat, but to small could mean an uncomfortable night.

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from DustinW wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Cool.

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from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

The best shelter i stayed in was a space blanket under a hemlock tree in the snow, the hemlock had plenty of room to lay down, and the blanket kept me warm all night.

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from Dakota.Woman wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

If there's wind, this won't stand up unless the tripod is made properly.. Tie 1 over 2 at about a 60 degree angle to each other, run the cord over & under 3-4X minimum, then stand the form up & walk the middle of the 2 around until the 3 parts lock together. Tie off, then add poles, leafy branches, grass, even large pieces of bark if there are downed logs nearby.. until the shelter is finished. By leaving a smoke hole at the top, you can be very cozy.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sean G wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Short on cordage to bind your tripod? Try strips of Birch bark or pull up some spruce roots.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Silewski11 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Nice steps and pictures.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FerolaJ wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I spent three cold nights in a debri hut and have some tips for those considering trying one out. Take your time with the initial set up, and try setting it up underneath a tree because using leaves to cover the very top of your a-frame can be quite difficult, and the tree cover helps to block possible rain. Also I reccomend making your a-fram fairly tall. I misjudged how tall I needed to make mine and spent three nights waking up in the middle of the night with my head poking out of my roof and all my collected leaves scattered about. Very disheartening when all you have eaten for three days is a handful of soloman seal and a frog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

I remember survival being taught in the Third Grade.

Even though I never nede these skills, you never know when you may need this.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nicole Rae Pound wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

traditional housing for the North & South Dakota Tribes :D

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from April Stoll wrote 1 year 9 weeks ago

we used to make the 3rd shelter when we were kids! We played in it for hours and sometimes even spent the night in them :)

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from Nelsondl wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

I have been interested in this area since I was a teenager, and I am now 57. I have tried various shelters over the decades, from the Sierra to near the Arctic Circle. I think the best thing you can do to provide emergency shelter in a wilderness situation is to be sure you always pack a survival kit when you go into the woods, and include in that kit two or three garbage bags. If you take them directly out of the box they come in and place them into a sandwich bag, then seal it, they will not open up and will stay nicely folded. They take up next to no room and weight nothing. Then, after you have made whatever windbreak or shelter out of whatever is available, you can line it with the garbage bag (slit open into a flat sheet with your knife), and crawl into another bag, to keep the wind off of you. I have done this in a driving rainstorm in Canada. Not comfortable, but survived.

The shelters shown here are not completely waterproof and windproof, unless you take days to construct it, and then it still is porous.

+13 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jesse wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

I think every outdoorsman should have some basic know how to buld a shelter just in case u never know when u could get lost or stranded

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from M Fet wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

This is a must know for outdoorsmen. But one must remember to make the shelter the right size. A shelter to large will lose all important body heat, but to small could mean an uncomfortable night.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dakota.Woman wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

If there's wind, this won't stand up unless the tripod is made properly.. Tie 1 over 2 at about a 60 degree angle to each other, run the cord over & under 3-4X minimum, then stand the form up & walk the middle of the 2 around until the 3 parts lock together. Tie off, then add poles, leafy branches, grass, even large pieces of bark if there are downed logs nearby.. until the shelter is finished. By leaving a smoke hole at the top, you can be very cozy.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sean G wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Short on cordage to bind your tripod? Try strips of Birch bark or pull up some spruce roots.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FerolaJ wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I spent three cold nights in a debri hut and have some tips for those considering trying one out. Take your time with the initial set up, and try setting it up underneath a tree because using leaves to cover the very top of your a-frame can be quite difficult, and the tree cover helps to block possible rain. Also I reccomend making your a-fram fairly tall. I misjudged how tall I needed to make mine and spent three nights waking up in the middle of the night with my head poking out of my roof and all my collected leaves scattered about. Very disheartening when all you have eaten for three days is a handful of soloman seal and a frog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sere9501 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Some of the shelters in this article are great and will work well in a lot of different situations but a lot will take a good amount of time to construct if you want them done right. That means waterproof and big enough for you and your gear. Like Nelson said you have to have a good Personal Survival Kit (PSK) with you when you are out. That extra five or ten pounds will mean the world to you when you absolutely need it, trust me I've been there and done that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from wally wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

These could come in handy if you are in any type of survival situation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

The best shelter i stayed in was a space blanket under a hemlock tree in the snow, the hemlock had plenty of room to lay down, and the blanket kept me warm all night.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Silewski11 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Nice steps and pictures.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DustinW wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Cool.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

I remember survival being taught in the Third Grade.

Even though I never nede these skills, you never know when you may need this.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nicole Rae Pound wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

traditional housing for the North & South Dakota Tribes :D

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from April Stoll wrote 1 year 9 weeks ago

we used to make the 3rd shelter when we were kids! We played in it for hours and sometimes even spent the night in them :)

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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