Jerry's Tips

CLEAN UP AFTER ICE-OUT
There is a burst of good fishing on northern lakes about three weeks after ice-out, when the water at the surface reaches 39 degrees. At that temperature, water reaches its greatest density and sinks to the bottom. This turnover of oxygen-laden surface water has a homogenizing effect throughout the water column, and fish at all levels are activated by the extra oxygen available.

ORGANIZE YOUR MESS KIT
When camping, tie a many-pocketed carpenter's apron at eye level on a tree trunk within reach of your cooking site. Fill the pockets with cooking utensils and a pair of long-handled pliers for handling hot pots and pans. The apron pockets provide a means of organizing utensils so you will always know where they are and have them close at hand when you need them.

SIT TIGHT FOR QUIET GOBBLERS
If a turkey that has been answering your calls suddenly goes silent, he may be trying to sneak in on you. Sit very still and make soft, contented hen clucks. Keep your eyes peeled, but don't move your head. Gobblers that sneak in will use cover to their advantage and watch carefully for movement. They often approach from behind and remain unseen until they are very close.

AVOID FOULED OUTBOARDS
Avoid contaminating your outboard's fuel system by purging the gas line before you start a motor that hasn't been run recently. Disconnect the fuel line from the engine and hold the connector over an empty container. Use a screwdriver to depress the plunger in the connector and squeeze the primer bulb repeatedly to pump out contaminated fuel that has been lying in the line.

LET THE ROD DO THE WORK
Spinfishermen and baitcasters can throw their line with greater distance and accuracy by leaving half a rod's length of line hanging from the rod tip when casting. This extra length causes the rod tip to flex deeper when the cast is made, generating more power from the rod with less effort from the wrist and arm. The reduced physical exertion permits better hand-eye coordination.