The Knot of the Month

We're now archiving this regular feature from the Sportsman's Notebook section of the magazine online. Check this page regularly for updates. This month (May issue) features a variation of that old standby, the blood knot.

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Field & Stream Online Editors

This Month’s Feature:
**The Blood-Knot Dropper
A dropper line above your fly, lure, or bait is the perfect way to rig split shot. When you snag, the weight will pull free and you’ll keep your terminal tackle.

Knots for Fishing
**The Blood-Knot Dropper
A dropper line above your fly, lure, or bait is the perfect way to rig split shot. When you snag, the weight will pull free and you’ll keep your terminal tackle.

**The Triple Surgeon’s Knot
Use this simple knot to join two lines that are similar in diameter. Do not use it with so-called superbraid lines or the knot will slip.

**The Albright Knot
As you rig tackle for spring fishing, chances are you’ll need an Albright knot. It’s used to connect two lines that differ greatly in diameter (say, adding a heavy shock leader to light spinning line). This version includes a lock option to keep the knot from coming undone.

**The Palomar Knot
This is the most widely useful-and easiest-of all terminal knots used in freshwater and inshore saltwater fishing. It works well with both nylon monofilaments and superbraids. When you’re tying on a hook, swivel, snap, or most lures, the Palomar knot is less complicated and usually stronger than the more common improved clinch knot.

**The Trilene Knot
Named after Berkley’s Trilene monofilament, the Trilene knot is a stronger variation of the commonly used improved clinch knot. Tied carefully, it tests at close to 100 percent of line strength. I often use it for tying lures or hooks to nylon monofilaments testing from 4 to 12 pounds. Tightening this knot with heavier lines is too difficult.

Knots for Camping and Hunting
**The Running Bowline
Use it to hang gear, drag game, or form a snare. The beauty of this knot is that it does not weaken rope and is easy to untie.

**The Transport Knot
This is one of a sportsman’s most important knots, used to secure cargo to a cartop or river raft. It is adjustable and won’t put a permanent loop in the middle of a line.

**The Figure-Eight Bend
Joining together two ropes is one of the most common camping tasks. The figure-eight bend, also known as the Flemish bend, is one of the strongest knots for tying together ropes of uneven diameters.

**The Butterfly Coil
The butterfly coil is the simplest and quickest way to coil and securely store a length of rope longer than 20 feet. It uncoils easily without forming kinks.