Giving States Their Proper Fly-Fishing Nicknames

I’m not in the fly fishing tourism business, but I’ve been to enough places to know that certain states should … Continued

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I’m not in the fly fishing tourism business, but I’ve been to enough places to know that certain states should adopt new mottos to attract anglers. I think the right tag line in the right place would go a long way toward generating fly fishing tourism.

For example:
Michigan might say, “If You Seek a Pleasant Peninsula, Look About You,” but that’s a bit cheesy (no offense Wisconsin). For fly anglers, I think Michigan should be known as “The Carpatan Peninsula.” Yes, there are a bazillion species to be caught on a fly rod here, but if you like carp, the sight fishing opportunities are far better than they are in Mexico’s Yucatan; bigger fish and clearer water. The food and beer are also better, and you can listen to Tigers games on the radio in English. Okay, so we have to work around that October through April thing, but the Carpatan offers the best flats fishing in North America, period.

Colorado is the “Centennial State,” but who’s counting anymore? For the fly angler, Colorado should be known as the “When You’re Freezing Your Butt Off, We’re still Catching Trout on Dry Flies” state. That probably doesn’t resonate with much effect right now, but check back with me in late October.

Wyoming is the “Cowboy State,” and there are indeed plenty of ‘pokes there. But it should be the “Keep it Under Your Hat” state, because every time I write about a great fishing situation in Wyoming, I get hate mail from a significant percentage of the half a million or so people who actually live there.

Louisiana is “Sportsman’s Paradise.” We’ll leave that one right as it is.

Pennsylvania is “The Keystone State.” I’d tweak that and say “Limestone Creek State.”

Florida is “The Sunshine State,” but to be honest, it should be “The Sunshine and 20-mph Offshore Breeze When You Plan a Tarpon Trip State”

Montana might be “Big Sky Country” but I think most anglers consider it “Big Opportunity” because it boasts some of the most intelligent and inclusive stream access laws in the country.

I’m sure we could come up with other lines that more adequately capture the angling essence of most states, couldn’t we?