Ethics Question: One Goose Over the Limit

Today we have a multiple choice ethics question. Not that anything like this ever happened to me or anything, but … Continued

Today we have a multiple choice ethics question.

Not that anything like this ever happened to me or anything, but imagine hypothetically you’re goose hunting with a party of seven. Geese fly non-stop from the beginning of shooting time. The first couple of bunches swing to your side of the spread. You shoot your two-goose limit, unload your gun and trade spots with someone else so he can get some shooting. Everyone shoots their limit in about 45 minutes. It’s a terrific hunt, but when you count the birds at the end, you’ve got 15 geese, not the 14 you should have. Someone evidently didn’t get the word that everybody is shooting their own limits, not party shooting.

No one fesses up to shooting a third goose. It may be an honest mistake. It may even be that someone shot a goose they didn’t see fall. Whatever the case, somebody is one bird over the limit. The chances of being checked in the field are virtually non-existant. What do you do? Choose an answer and explain why you chose it.

A. Call the warden, explain happened, and bear the consequences.

B. Leave the bird in the field.

C. Make everyone replay every minute of the hunt until you figure out who shot the extra goose, then turn him in.

D. Send the extra goose home with a volunteer.

E. None of the above, instead you ____________ (fill in the blank)