ICAST Report: Tying On The Fish You're Trying To Catch

I'm sure most of you have lures donning baby bass patterns in your tackle bag. No doubt, big bass eat little bass, which is why this color is so common on standard-sized crankbaits. The carnivorous tendencies of big predator fish have always been exploited by lure companies, but not to the extent I'm seeing at ICAST this year. Like the last few years, ultra-realistic lures are still trendy. It's just that they seem to have gotten bigger, and instead of mimicking prey species, they're matching smaller version of our intended targets. Most intriguing to me at the new products showcase last night was Biwaa's Swimpike (below). Eleven joints are supposed to get this 10-inch baby Esox swimming like a champ. It's anatomically perfect, and that perfection will set you back $38.

ICAST pike

Then there's Barry The Bass ($19) from Fairpoint Outdoors (below). He's part of a new line that also features pike and perch imitations with equally cute names. Barry is technically a smallmouth, though I was a bit more impressed with him in a peacock bass pattern. This bait measures 6 inches and weighs in at 2 ounces. Per the product description, big bass just lose control when Barry struts his stuff past reed beds, rattling his head and jiggling his back end like the most terrified of baby bass.

Perhaps this trend means more anglers are looking for "the one" instead of just looking to bend rods these days. Or maybe the fishing industry knows many us of just think this stuff is cool and that's enough to stoke the manufacturing fire.

ICASTbass