Gunfight Friday: Crickett vs. Model 64

It's pretty hard to top last week's rifles for a Hawaiian cow safari, so I won't try. But, every feral-cow safari is years in the making, beginning with first shots, and today, we've got a pair of .22 LR plinking rifles. The common link between these two, besides caliber, is aesthetics. We will take the high road and say only of these rifles that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. One has a pink factory stock, the other a homemade hardwood stock.

The Crickett rifle has been around since the 1990s, and it is an inexpensive, and kid-friendly, rimfire rifle, cut down to fit small shooters and weighing all of 2½ pounds. The Savage 64 is still in current production. It’s an inexpensive semi-auto with a 10-round box magazine. There’s a saying about turning sow’s ears into silk purses, but I like Kevin’s upgrade even if I don’t quite understand it.

Savage Model 64
Kevin’s Model 64 This Savage Model 64 was purchased from Wally World for $99. It came with a black synthetic stock. The homemade stock was carved from a 2x8 board, with a trigger guard and aluminum buttplate. It digests everything from hollowpoints to solids, even subsonics, with absolute reliability. This may be one of the cheapest custom rifles in existence, but I don't have to worry about marring a costly slab of walnut.Reader Submitted
Crickett rifle
Chad’s Crickett Yes, it's pink. Yes, it's real. Those are the two most common answers I give when talking about this rifle. My dad picked it up when "the grandkids" were just babies. Since then, it's been used to introduce those same grandkids to the world of shooting sports. Being a single-shot, there's not much there to break. The Crickett is rugged and durable and always goes bang when you squeeze the trigger. It has a rear peep sight and front blade sight and is ridiculously accurate. And it's pink.Reader Submitted

Vote and comment below, and keep the gun pictures coming to fsgunnuts@gmail.com.

Which gun do you prefer?
Chad’s Crickett
Kevin’s Model 64