A Knife for the Next Depression

More goodies from Remington.

Tango1cdrop

This is not a new knife (or a knew nife) but I gave it short shrift last year when it came out and I regret that, because it’s a very good one. It’s designation is Tango Series I Fixed (which is odd, because in milspeak, Tango refers to a terrorist). It’s what gun writer Ken Warner refers to as a “sharpened pry bar,” which means the thing is just about indestructible. There are military, civilian, and law enforcement models with a choice of drop point (shown here), sabre point, or tanto point in either 440C or N690 stainless. The handle scales are G-10, which is glass-filled epoxy that is harder than Hillary’s heart.

Blade length is 5-1/3 inches and overall is 10-1/2 inches. Sheaths are Cordura nylon, tactical, and high-speed, low drag. The blades are very heavy—just over 1/4-inch thick, as nearly as I can tell, which is pretty rare these days. I don’t see how you could damage the Tango I even with unreasonable use. In the times to come, this would seem an ideal tool for cutting into wheels of government cheese, butchering rats you have shot for food, or breaking your way into an unoccupied house to spend the night. (It beats your car.) The price is around $130.

And on a slightly more upbeat note, if you’re looking for an effective low-noise-level .22 LR round, may I recommend Remington’s new CBee 22. It fires a 33-grain bullet at 740 fps, will work flawlessly through any .22 LR rifle (although it does not pack the pork to cycle a .22 auto). Accuracy and expansion are claimed to be excellent (Remington had to invent a new kind of .22 bullet to provide the latter). A box of 100 is $5.55.