Behind the Scenes at the Smith & Wesson Factory, Part II

The S&W Custom Shop accommodates all kinds of requests. This is the barrel of a revolver being made for "Pastor John" (it says so on the other side). Luke 22:36 reads: "But now if you have a purse, take it, and also a bag; and if you don't have a sword, sell your cloak and buy one."
Next year is the 100th birthday of the classic 1911. Here's a custom shop commemorative edition for you to drool over.
Having been in business since for over 150 years, Smith & Wesson has some wonderful memorabilia. The company often commissioned oil paintings for advertising purposes. Paul Pluff stands next to one of several Frederick Remington originals in the halls, this one is called "With the wolfhounds
The small museum in the factory contains many wonders from the very first S&W handguns to modern custom guns. This ornate revolver is one of nearly 200 S&W commissioned jeweler Tiffany& Co. to decorate for the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
The S&W shooting center a short distance from the factory has both a public range with fully stocked pro shop as well as ranges used for law enforcement training. I am about to let fly with a .460 on the one of the training ranges.
Gordon shoots the .460 S&W Magnum loaded with 200 grain Hornady LEVERevolution bullets at 2200 fps. Indoors, its bark is immense: there's a fireball, and you expect plaster to fall from the ceiling from the echoing concussion. However, the gun weighs 4 ½ pounds and has a muzzlebrake. Its bite isn't bad if you hold it properly.
After the thunder and lightning of the .460 I calmed my nerves with a few magazines full of soothing .22 rimfire ammo from a M&P 15 22.
Meanwhile, back at the plant . . . they're making more.