Guns on Film: Can You Answer These 12 Movie Gun Trivia Questions?

Rambo

gunsfilmintro

Let's have a little fun. As is the case for many, the guns I grew up hunting with represent my first real world experience with firearms. But from an even earlier age, my interest in guns was definitely peaked by those I saw in movies. Whether it was to find out what kind of gun a hero or villain carried, or just a desire to know how the gun I saw on the screen really worked, movies provided that spark that made me want to find out more. In a way, guns made me a movie nut, and vice versa. I mean, how can you blame me with toys like this beckoning from the aisles of Kiddie City...yeah, I definitely had this one. If you can relate, or just want to remember some awesome movie moments, click through this gallery of trivia questions. On the first slide for each movie, I pose a question about a film character that met his demise in front of a muzzle. The question might be about the movie, the guns in the movie, or both. Click to the next slide to see if you're right and learn some fun movie gun facts along the way. Every film in here is at least a decade old, so there shouldn't be any spoilers for anyone. And if you haven't seen the flicks in this gallery...you should probably turn in your man card anyway. Have fun! --DMField & Stream Online Editors
Point Break
RIP: Gary Busey as FBI Agent Angelo Pappas in_ Point Break_ (1991) How many shotgun rounds did it take to put down the Buse in this '90s action classic?Field & Stream Online Editors
Remington 870
Answer: 2 rounds. One from a Mossberg pump and another from a cut-down Remington 870 The crazy known as The Buse didn't make it to the end of this action classic from the early '90s about a gang of bank-robbing surfers. The movie was primarily a vehicle for young Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze to look awesome while jumping out of planes, running around on fire, throwing dogs at people (seriously, this happens) and saying incredibly spirtitual and macho things. So, poor Gary's out-of-shape, washed up FBI agent character ends up getting perforated with shotgun blasts not once, but twice. Just when you really started to like him...go figure. Here's a picture of the fella who finally took him down. Pappas actually got the jump on ol' Roach here (James LeGros), giving him that serious chest wound, only to catch some buckshot in the back from a Mossberg pump, but that didn't kill him. Pappas spins after being hit and takes down the goon with the Mossberg, only to be shot in the back...again...by the wounded Roach who was still kicking on the ground with his cut-down Remington 870. Don't worry, Busey gets a nice little death scene (mercifully short and without dialogue) while cradled in Johnny Utah's arms (Reeves).Field & Stream Online Editors
_Training Day_
RIP: Denzel Washington as Det. Alonzo Harris in Training Day (2001) What kind of hardware did it take to finally put down the ultimate Dirty Cop? Bonus question: what kind of shotgun is he holding in the bottom two photos?Field & Stream Online Editors
AKMSU Carbines
Answer: A Veritable Salvo from several AKMSU Carbines The end of Denzel's Oscar-winning portrayal of a LAPD detective gone bad came in a hail of bullets...and I mean a hail. Having survived his encounter with officer Jake Hoyt (Ethan Hawke) with a .45 slug in his butt, Alonzo encounters a Russian mafia hit squad that boxes in his car with two vans and a Humvee. After they turn his car into swiss cheese with full-auto AKMSU carbines (what else would the Russian mob use but an AK variant?), a badly wounded Alonzo stumbles out, full of holes, only to be gunned down with a brutal final volley of automatic fire. In the previous photo, Alonzo is brandishing one of the coolest Remington 870 configurations ever on screen…that bad boy has a heat-shield, as found on the 870 Trench Shotgun, and a Mark1 bayonet mount. Alonzo: "You know I'm surgical with this b****, Jake. How do you want it, dog? Closed casket? Remember that fool in the wheelchair? How do you think he got there?"Field & Stream Online Editors
_Tombstone_
RIP: Michael Biehn as Johnny Ringo in Tombstone (1993) Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer) carried two different Colt pistols in this film. Which one took out the most ruthless "Cowboy"?Field & Stream Online Editors
Colt Single Action Army Quickdraw
Answer: Colt Single Action Army Quickdraw The first great film to follow the 90s resurgence of westerns in Hollywood after Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven (1992), Tombstone was definitely an action western with lots of horse chases, guns and cowboy swagger. (And it blew Kevin Costner's ruminating Wyatt Earp out of the water at the box office when both films came out around the same time.) In the previous photo, Michael Beihn as Johnny Ringo holds his Colt Single Action Army Quickdraw pistol on Doc Holliday, played by Val Kilmer in what may be the best performance of his career. In the flick, Doc carries two pistols: a Colt Lightning (in .38 Long Colt) and his own Nickel Colt SAA Quickdraw. In a classic showdown, Doc and Ringo draw on each other in the woods near the end of the film and Doc takes him down with a single shot to the head from his Quickdraw, named as such because of its short, 4.7-inch, barrel. Ringo: "Well...I didn't think you had it in you," (expecting Wyatt Earp). Doc: (Stepping from the shadows) "I'm your huckleberry. Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just...walked over your grave." Ringo: "Fight's not with you, Holliday." Doc: "I beg to differ, sir. We started a game we never got to finish. Play for blood, remember?" Ringo: "I was just foolin' about." Doc: "I wasn't." In the second photo, from earlier in the movie, you can see Doc's Quickdraw in his right hand, along with a tin shot glass, and the Lightning in his left. Billy Clanton (Thomas Haden Church): "It's the drunk piano player. You're so drunk you're prolly seeing double." Doc Holliday: "I have two guns…one for each of ya..." Farther down, Doc and Ringo square off as Doc readies his fingers by the butt of his Colt in a cross-draw holster before an impressive-looking quickdraw (for an actor anyway).Field & Stream Online Editors
_Reservoir Dogs_
Michael Madsen as Mr. Blonde/Vic Vega in Reservoir Dogs (1992) Which character put an end to this squirm-enducing scene, and to the sadistic Mr. Blonde?Field & Stream Online Editors
Smith & Wesson Model 659
Answer: Mr. Orange with a full mag from his Smith & Wesson Model 659 Ah, who could forget the bloodbath that was Quentin Tarantino's breakout film, Reservoir Dogs, about a surly group of robbers and a jewel heist gone wrong. In the film's most memorable scene (pictured in the previous slide) Michael Madsen as the psychotic Mr. Blonde tortures a captured police officer, slashing his face with a straight razor and even removing an ear. "I don't know what you know or don't know...but I'm going to torture you. Regardless. Not to get information. It's amusing to me to torture a cop." But when he doused the cop with gasoline and was preparing to burn him alive, Mr. Orange (Tim Roth), bleeding to death on the floor from a gut shot, breaks his cover and unloads his S&W Model 659 into his torso, saving the cop...from burning alive, at least. Notice in the third photo how the blast from the squib on Madsen's chest actually extinguished the flame on his Zippo. All the henchmen in the movie carry S&W 659s that they were issued for the robbery, though Mr. White (Harvey Keitel) also carries a personal S&W Model 639 seen in the bottom photo on the left. Note the rounded trigger guard.Field & Stream Online Editors
_Terminator 2: Judgment Day_
**RIP: Robert Patrick as the T-1000 in Terminator 2: Judgment Day
**
Did the T-1000 succumb to a Remington 870, or something with a little more kick?
Field & Stream Online Editors
870 and an M79 Grenade Launcher
**Answer: It took both an 870 and an M79 Grenade Launcher, plus a healthy dose of molten metal.
**
After absorbing literally hundreds of rounds as Arnold's liquid metal adversary in this special effects watershed film, the T-1000 (Robert Patrick) was finally done in with a whole bunch of shotgun blasts and one round from an M79 Grenade Launcher...plus a little help from a giant vat of molten steel. Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton) helped a bit, repeatedly firing her Remington 870 with a folding stock trying to force the seemingly indestructible foe into the vat, but she ran out of ammo just as he was at the edge. Fortunately, the badly damaged T-800 (Schwarzenegger) rolls into view on a giant gear and plops a grenade from his M79 into the T-1000's chest. After a beat, he explodes into a writhing mess of mercury-looking stuff before falling into the pit where he melts away. In reality, the 40mm grenades fired from the M79 have a safety mechanism whereby the fuse doesn't ignite until the round has completed a predetermined number of rotations after being fired, creating an effective safe distance and preventing a grenade accidentally fired too close from killing it's user. There also wouldn't have been a delay after it hit the T-1000, but who wants reality when we're talking Terminators? It was awesome. Period.
Field & Stream Online Editors
_Saving Private Ryan_
RIP: Tom Hanks as Capt. John H. Miller in Saving Private Ryan (1998) After fighting his way through Italy and surviving the beach at Normandy, what rifle fired the single round that ended the war for Tom Hanks' now immortal Capt. Miller and which character fired the shot?Field & Stream Online Editors
Karabiner 98k
Answer: Karabiner 98k fired by Steamboat Willie It was one shot fired from across the bridge that killed Miller during the climactic battle in Ramelle. The German soldier who fired the shot was only credited as Steamboat Willie (Joerg Stadler) because of his attempts to relate to the American soldiers through pop culture references earlier in the film...and desperately persuade them not to kill him on the spot. "Steamboat Willie, toot, toot!" "Please, I like America! Fancy schmancy! What a cinch! Go fly a kite! Cat got your tongue! Hill of beans! Betty boop, what a dish. Betty Grable, nice gams." Yep, it was the same soldier the squad captured earlier in the film and forced to dig graves after medic Irwin Wade (Giovanni Ribisi) was killed. They released him at the urging of the cowardly (that's my opinion, and I'm sticking to it) Cpl. Timothy Upham (Jeremy Davies). Upham ultimately takes his revenge on Willie...though it's too little, too late. In the bottom photo, Miller fires his 1911 dry at an advancing Tiger tank after being immobilized by the chest wound from the Karabiner 98k, until the tank is destroyed by a P-51 Mustang. Miller: "Angels on our shoulders…"Field & Stream Online Editors
_Se7en_
RIP: Kevin Spacey as John Doe in Se7en (1995) If you've seen this one, then you couldn't have forgotten the ending. For the gun nuts: What unique pistol did Det. David Mills carry and finally use at the end of the movie after John Doe's (Kevin Spacey) revelation? For the movie nuts: How many shots does Mills fire after he finds out what's in the box?Field & Stream Online Editors
Custom Springfield 1911A1
Answer: 6 Rounds from a Custom Springfield 1911A1 John Doe: "Become vengeance, David. Become wrath." The ending of this ultra-grim serial killer mystery was at the same time incredibly satisfying and horrifying, which to me makes it one of the greatest endings ever. If you don't know what I mean, rent it, buy it, stream it...whatever. Watch it and stop reading. If you've seen it...then you'll be interested to know the .45 Mills carries throughout the film is a Custom Springfield 1911-A1 with adjustable sights, a mag-na ported barrel, beavertail grip safety, combat ring hammer, extended slide stop safety and extended slide release, 3-hole trigger, square trigger guard and stag horn grips. It remains silent for the whole movie until this scene at the end. And there's the second part of the answer: Mills fires six shots into John Doe after he finds out... "What's in the boooooox...!?" It may have been more poetic if he had fired seven rounds, but Mills did represent the seventh sin himself...so in a way it works. The top photo is actually a very accurate airsoft reproduction of the gun Mills carried in the movie (courtesy of the Internet Movie Firearms Database). In the lower photos, you can clearly see the pistol's mag-na port as the gun fires in slow motion and as Mills does a brass check.Field & Stream Online Editors
_Platoon_
RIP: Tom Berenger as Staff Sgt. Barnes in Platoon (1986) This film provided breakout roles for many actors, Berenger and Charlie Sheen included. What weapon did Chris Taylor use to get revenge on Barnes (top) for what he did to Sgt. Elias (Willem Dafoe) after the film's final battle?Field & Stream Online Editors
Norinco Type 56
Answer: Norinco Type 56 If you said an AK-47, that works. I know a few things about firearms, but I still can't differentiate the multitudinous AK variants on sight. The rifle Taylor picks up from the fallout of the massive climactic battle scene is an enemy's Type 56 with a folding bayonet. He checks the brass before looking around and setting his dazed, wild eyes on a wounded Sgt. Barnes crawling nearby. In the two shots of Barnes laying on his back, you can see how his shirt goes from being mostly whole to being ripped with the squib packs clearly visible beneath from one shot to the next. It's a continuity error that, once I noticed it, took a little something away from an otherwise incredibly powerful scene. Is it me, or in the bottom photo does Sheen look eerily like his father from Apocalypse Now? Barnes: "Ya'll talking about killin'? Ya'll experts? Ya'll know about killin'? Well, I'd like to hear about it potheads...You smoke this s*** so's to escape from reality? Me, I don't need this s***. (Swigs from a bottle of Jack) I am reality. There's the way it ought to be, and there's the way it is. Elias was full of s***. Elias was a crusader. Now, I got no fight, with any man does what he's told. But when he don't, the machine breaks down. And when the machine breaks down we break down. And I ain't gonna allow that. From any of ya. Not one."Field & Stream Online Editors
_Pulp Fiction_
**RIP Marvin and Vincent Vega from Pulp Fiction (1994)
**
Tarantino wrote the demise of a second Vega brother, who was a little more dullard and a lot less sadist than Michael Madsen's Vic Vega in Reservoir Dogs. Vincent Vega doesn't make it out of Pulp Fiction alive...but perhaps the most memorable death scene in the film was that of poor Marvin (Phil LaMarr) at Vincent's hand. So on to the question...it's a two-parter: First, many people think Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) carry the same nickel-plated pistols...but do they? If you know the answer to that, was Marvin shot with a 9mm or a .45? Bonus Question: Which character with which gun put an end to Mr. Vega?
Field & Stream Online Editors
.45
Answer: First - No, they don't carry the same pistol
Second: Marvin was shot with a .45
Bonus: Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis) with a suppressed Ingram MAC-10
Though the pistols are very similar, they are made by different manufacturers and chambered in different calibers. Vincent carries a chromed Auto Ordinance 1911A1 in .45 ACP (left), more than explaining why Marvin's head ended up all over the back seat and providing a very sound example of the importance of trigger discipline. Jules carries a Star Model B pistol chambered in 9mm. This lays waste to claims that there was an error in dialogue later in the film when Jules refers to his gun as "Mr. Nine Millimeter" in the diner. And finally, Vincent Vega met his end at the hands of boxer Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis). Vega was shot with his own MAC-10 that he left on the kitchen counter while heeding nature's call. Oops...but appropriate for an "Elvis man."
Field & Stream Online Editors
_The Untouchables_
RIP: Bowtie Driver (Vito D'Ambrosio) in The Untouchables (1987) What a classic. Brian DePalma's take on the often-immitated "Odessa Steps" sequence at the end of this star-studded remake is the crown jewel of a wholly kicka** film. After the wild gun battle in the train station, what pistol fired the final shot that took out Al Capone's sweaty-faced goon holding a gun on the mob Bookkeeper? Here's a hint: it was fired by Agent George Stone (Andy Garcia)...and it wasn't a Tommy Gun. But how could I resist a photo of a guy with a Thompson on horseback.Field & Stream Online Editors
Smith & Wesson Model 10
Answer: A Smith & Wesson Model 10 Stone (Garcia) stops the baby carriage after its long roll down the train station steps with a slide across the floor, and immediately has his Model 10 trained on the hostage taker. Elliot Ness (Kevin Costner) lowers his weapon, and lets the young crackshot handle the situation, sending a round through Bowtie's throat, right past the Bookkeeper's ear. When will bad guys learn that a countdown is never a good idea? Bowtie: "Me and the bookkeeper are walking out of here, getting in a car and driving away or else he dies! He dies and you ain't got nothing! You got five seconds to make up your minds."
Ness: "You got him?"
Stone: (as calm as can be) "Yeah. I got him."
Bowtie: "One!"
Ness: "Take him."
BLAM
Stone: "Two."
Field & Stream Online Editors
_RoboCop_
RIP Officer Alex J. Murphy (Peter Weller) in RoboCop (1987) Here's another two-parter. What model shotgun is Clarence Boddicker (Kurtwood Smith) wielding, which he later uses to dispatch Officer Murphy? AND what kind of handgun does RoboCop carry? Yes, believe it or not, there's a real pistol under there somewhere. Can you tell what it is?Field & Stream Online Editors
Remington 1100
Answer: Clarence is holding a cut-down Remington 1100. RoboCop's "Auto 9" is actually a Beretta 93R machine pistol. Long before he was the curmudgeonly dad on That 70's Show, Kurtwood Smith played the cruel and villainous Clarence Boddicker in Paul Verhoeven's dismally brutal '80s classic. He uses a sawed off Remington 1100 semiauto with a heat shield in the first part of the movie, which he uses to "kill" Officer Alex Murphy. (Technically, Murphy is shot by what amounts to a firing squad, but I can't even show you a photo of that bloody scene.) Someone had to be the bad guy and shoot Murphy so he could come back as: RoboCop and his awe inspiring Auto 9 (top), which is really a Beretta underneath. The 93R (left) is a fully automatic version of the Beretta 92FS (right, and the current U.S. military sidearm, the M-9) pistol. In fact, you will see a lot of movies try to pass a 92FS off as a full-auto 93R. You can easily spot a fake. The 92FS has an integrated safety/decocking lever on the slide. The fire selector/safety on a 93R is mounted on the frame. RoboCop's gun, that awesome one that he keeps in a hollow compartment in his robot leg, is a 93R with a few embellishments, namely an elongated, ported barrel, and a giant shroud that covers the extra barrel length and extends beneath the slide to the trigger guard. Topped with big sights, the gun also has an extended magazine and custom grips, making it nearly unrecognizable. Robo fires the gun in bursts, but no magazine in the world could hold the amount of ammo he goes through. I don't believe he reloads once in the whole film. But he just looks so robot-satisfied behind that Barrett, doesn't he? RoboCop: "Dead or alive, you're coming with me." Bob Morton: "Here at Security Concepts, we're predicting the end of crime in Old Detroit within 40 days. There's a new guy in town. His name, is RoboCop."Field & Stream Online Editors
_Lethal Weapon_
RIP: Gary Busey as Mr. Joshua in Lethal Weapon (1987) We begin with Busey and we end with Busey. Looking much younger, more fit, and a little less wild-eyed than he did in Point Break, the Buse was the heavyweight mercenary villain in the first Lethal Weapon installment that created the template for countless buddy-cop movies to follow. So who shot Mr. Joshua after the big fight on the lawn in the spray of the broken fire hydrant? Was it Sgt. Martin Riggs (Mel Gibson) with his Beretta 92F or Sgt. Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover) with his S&W Model 19?Field & Stream Online Editors
Beretta 92F
Answer: Both Ok, it was a little bit of a trick question. After the quite unnecessary, but totally awesome, hand-to-hand battle between Riggs and Joshua on Murtaugh's hydrant-soaked front lawn, Joshua is defeated when Riggs chokes him out in a leg-lock...or is he? When two cops drag him up to cuff him, Joshua spins around one officer and attempts to fire his sidearm at Riggs while it's still holstered, but the super cops are faster, both drawing their weapons and putting a round each in Joshua's chest. For a long time I wondered how Riggs got his pistol back, when he clearly didn't have it during the fight, but if you look close, it's tucked in Roger's waistband. The bottom pic is an actual photo I took of the Model 19 that Danny Glover used in the first Lethal Weapon from an S&W display at SHOT Show 2011. Back in '87 the Beretta 92F was depicted by Hollywood as a very cutting-edge pistol, which contrasted perfectly with Roger's old-school wheel gun. Murtaugh: "That's some serious **** you're carryin' there."
Riggs: "Be my guest…"
Murtaugh: "9mm Beretta...takes 15 in the mag one up the pipe...wide ejection port...no feed jams."
Riggs: "What you got in there?"
Murtaugh: "Four-inch Smith."
Riggs: "Six-shooter, huh? A lot of old-timers carry those."
Field & Stream Online Editors
_Die Hard_
EXTRA: Because John McClane was painfully absent from this gallery, I had to give him an extra slide. This is a simple one. In the original Die Hard (1988) McClane carried a Beretta 92F. There have since been three sequels. Did he carry the Beretta in all of them? If not, what did he carry?Field & Stream Online Editors
Beretta 92FS
ANSWER: No. In the most recent sequel, he traded in his Beretta. The original (top) is still the best, but what would an '80s action flick be without a heap of sequels? John McClane carried a Beretta 92FS (outwardly nearly identical to the 92F) in Die Hard 2: Die Harder (1990) and in Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995), but traded it in, along with the last remnants of his hair, for a SIG-Sauer P220 in the even more comically titled Live Free or Die Hard (2007). The fourth movie is also the first time McClane ever loses his handgun in the film series. And, possibly as a nod to the original, he picks up a replacement: a Beretta Px4 Storm.Field & Stream Online Editors

_Let's have a little fun. As is the case for many, the guns I grew up hunting with represent my first real world experience with firearms. But from an even earlier age, my interest in guns was definitely peaked by those I saw in movies. Whether it was to find out what kind of gun a hero or villain carried, or just a desire to know how the gun I saw on the screen really worked, movies provided that spark that made me want to find out more. In a way, guns made me a movie nut, and vice versa. I mean, how can you blame me with toys like this beckoning from the aisles of Kiddie City...yeah, I definitely had this one.

If you can relate, or just want to remember some awesome movie moments, click through this gallery of movie gun trivia questions. On the first slide for each movie, I pose a question about a film character that met his demise in front of a muzzle. It might be about the movie, the guns in the movie, or both. Click to the next slide to see if you're right and learn some fun movie gun facts along the way.

Every film in here is at least a decade old, so there shouldn't be any spoilers for anyone. And if you haven't seen the flicks in this gallery...you should probably turn in your man card anyway. Have fun!_ --Dave Maccar