Super Buck Hiding Spots: Farmland

FARMLAND

AGRICULTURAL AREAS OFFER NUMEROUS REFUGES FOR SHY, RECLUSIVE WHITETAILS.

SMALL CRP FIELD Superbucks like to bed in these fields planted in tall switchgrass or other native grasses, 5 to 7 feet tall, because they can hear hunters approaching.

OLD ABANDONED HOMESITE These often have forage available where the yard once was: old fruit trees, overgrown grasses, and escaped hedges, plus brush for cover.

SWAMP Thick, junglelike swamps with dry hummocks--even small ones--give superbucks a place to bed. Wear waders to reach them before daylight; you may hear a buck sloshing toward you at dawn.

ROADSIDE BRUSH PATCH Typically overlooked and thus unlikely to be hunted, this spot could harbor a big buck for the entire season.

REMOTE THICKET NEAR LATE FOOD SOURCE Even the smallest thicket may hold a superbuck if it's convenient to wheat, oats, rye, or leftover corn.

MOUNTAINS

CONCENTRATE ON THE CHANGES IN COVER, BOTH DRASTIC AND SUBTLE.

BENCH JUST BELOW RIDGETOP Such shelves offer excellent vantage points and are difficult to access, making them hard to hunt effectively--perfect habitat for a big loner buck.

THICKET WITHIN A THICKET Superbucks will often remain in these small brushy pockets that can only be found by scouting.

DENSE CONIFER STAND If the pines or spruces here are too thick to walk through easily, a superbuck may choose it for his hideout.

RAVINE CHOKED WITH BLOWDOWNS, GRAPEVINES, AND BRIERS Though easily accessed, such jumbles are difficult for a hunter to move through quietly. They can provide both food and cover.

ISOLATED NATURAL CLEARING IN OTHERWISE DENSE WOODS A superbuck may sneak into such a clearing to feed on forbs at first and last light.

CLEAR-CUT REVERTING BACK TO THE WILD Low brush and saplings provide dense cover that hunters tend to avoid, as well as tender leaves and twigs for forage.

BRUSHY ISLAND Yes, deer will swim, and an island--even one with just a minimal amount of cover--provides seclusion.