Under New Management

Three words. President Elect Obama. We don't have to say more than that to get a good conversation going. Whether you considered the last minutes of Tuesday night a historic victory or stinging defeat, whether you're excited about the next four years or planning to expatriate, whether you voted for Obama, didn't vote for Obama or chose not to vote at all, you're bound to have a strong opinion about the world-captivating outcome of the 2008 presidential election.

 I, for one, have never felt more motivated to get out and vote -- and I know that's true of a lot of people. I have a friend who volunteered to drive an 89-year-old man with bad knees to his polling place. He'd never voted in his life, but to him, this particular election was worth all the trouble. 

 I'm sure everyone read the interviews with Senators Obama and McCain in the October issue of Field & Stream. But I figure it's worth remembering the then-Senator's closing comments to F&S Editor-in-Chief Anthony Licata. 

LICATA: Why should American sportsmen vote for you?
SENATOR OBAMA: I think that when it comes to conservation, when it comes to management of public lands,when it comes to access to public lands, when it comes to encouraging access to private lands through various incentives, my agenda I think is going to be one that is most likely to ensure that we have the great outdoors available to the next generation. I don't think there are going to be a lot of your readers who look at my agenda and say that's not the right way to go. What may hold them back is their concern about gun rights, and I think that if they have confidence that their gun rights are going to be protected, and I'm respectful of the traditions of hunting and self-defense, then I'm going to be their best choice. The only reason they wouldn't vote for me, I think, would be because they'd be afraid that in some ways I would encroach on those rights. And I think if you talk to sportsmen back in Illinois, they'll tell you that those are traditions that not only [do] I respect, but I intend to respect.

_ _ I do consider Tuesday's election history in the making, but I know we weren't all in the Obama camp. Whether you supported Obama or McCain or wanted to see Palin in the White House, how are you doing now on the other side of the election? -K.H.

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