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Q:
I am just starting out in ice fishing. I want to know what is the best way to get started and what do i need?

Question by firemedic927. Uploaded on January 16, 2009

Answers (18)

Top Rated
All Answers
from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 5 years 14 weeks ago

Your going to need some short rods and possibly tip-ups, depending on what kind of ice fishing your going to be doing.
Next your going to need an ice auger. If you live somewhere like Minnesota where the ice is frequently over three feet thick, you're not going to want to be caught dead with a hand crank auger. I have had an Eskimo auger for over 10 years and it looks just like the ones that Cabelas is currently rolling off the shelves. I works extremely well and will drill 3 feet of ice in about 15 seconds.
Your going to want some sort of sonar to find structure and depth. If your on a tight budget, the Fishin Buddy series mounted to a 2x4 to set over your hole will work well. If your a high roller, the Vexillar is the way to go.
Once again, depending on your budget, you can get a 5 gallon bucket to sit on, or you could get a pop up ice house with a 20 pound propane tank with a Mr. Heater on it.
That should get you started, and your wife good and pissed off.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from T wrote 5 years 14 weeks ago

Try this site for help-

http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/basicicefishin_tvzi.htm

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Charley wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

The best way to get started is to find someone to go with. See what they are using, then bust the bank buying your own.
Wait until mid- Feb to March when all of the ice inventory goes on sale.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Skeeb wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Jigging poles, jigs, wax worms, tip ups, minnows, and the most important ice fishing tool, a case of beer!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice Fishing Basics:
For a first trip, try to pick an opportune weather day -- remember those blustery January days will soon fade into mild February and spring-like March days which often provide some of the most productive ice fishing of the season. Whatever the day you decide to go ice fishing, be sure to check the ice for safety.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

The Waters . . .
Most all ponds and lakes offer ice fishing potential. Their characteristics define the kinds of fish that may be caught. Large, shallower ponds and lakes favor species such as chain pickerel, northern pike, yellow perch and sunfish. Deepwater lakes need to be fished selectively to get good catches of northern pike, walleye or lake trout. Brown trout, rainbow trout and landlocked salmon, where they may legally be taken, are often found in deep lakes, which provide necessary cool temperatures in the summertime. However, when these lakes are ice-covered, trout are frequently caught while cruising just a few feet under the ice. The local tackle shop where you purchase your bait should be able to advise you on where fish are currently being caught.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Cutting the Ice...
Getting through the ice is not as hard as it might seem. There are a variety of tools available that make this "essential task" fairly simple. Perhaps the simplest is an old-fashioned "spud" bar which your grandfather may have used on his ice fishing trips. Spuds are often the cheapest way to cut a hole in the ice and work reasonably well on ice up to about a foot thick. Hand-powered augers, which are slightly more expensive than spud bars, are easy to operate and offer the best all-around compromise for moderate ice conditions. Try to purchase an auger appropriate to the species of fish that you are seeking. Anglers who fish for yellow perch, sunfish and other pan fish frequently favor ice augers 4", 5" or 6" in diameter because of their light weight and the speed that they bore through the ice. Anglers who fish for larger fish, such as trout, lake trout, landlocked salmon and northern pike, frequently prefer an ice auger which will make a larger hole -- an appreciated feature during the often-tricky landing of these large fish. But remember, cutting an 8" hole requires the removal of almost twice as much ice as a 6" hole, so don't buy an ice auger much bigger than you will need. For the avid ice angler or for thicker, more extreme ice conditions, more expensive, gas-powered augers provide the ultimate in speed and convenience, albeit at a sacrifice in weight and portability. Power augers come in diameters up to 10" and the size of the hole makes little difference in the speed or difficulty of cutting the hole.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice Fishing Methods...
Ice fishing methods include "jigging" with short, light fishing rods and using tip-ups. There are many different kinds of jigging poles and tip-ups. Much of the equipment is easy to make.
Jigging involves the use of a jigging rod or hand line and a small jigging spoon or lure which is often "sweetened" with a piece of bait. The jig is designed to dart around in different directions when it is jerked up and down by the angler.
The tip-up is basically a spool on a stick holding a baited line suspended through a hole in the ice. When the bait - usually a minnow - is taken by a fish, the pull on the line releases a signal, such as a red flag.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Clothing...
For safe ice fishing outings, anglers need to be well prepared. Proper clothing is critical because most people do not move around much while ice fishing. Dress warmly, paying extra attention to your head, feet and hands - dressing in layers is essential.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice safety...
Safe ice is the number one consideration. A minimum of three to four inches of solid ice is the general rule for safety. Ice thickness, however, is not uniform on any body of water. The guidelines presented here are based on clear, blue, hard ice on non-running waters. Remember, your own good judgement is essential!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

And, last but not least, the fishing regulations...
In New York State, general angling regulations limit anglers to two jigging lines (or hand lines) and five tip-ups in most waters. Each tip-up must be marked with the operator's name and address; the operator must be in immediate attendance when the lines are in the water. Since special regulations apply on many waters, review the current fishing regulations guide when planning an ice fishing trip - and don't forget your current year's fishing license. To identify good ice fishing waters in the area where you plan to fish, contact the DEC Regional Fisheries Office for that area.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 3 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Dutchess County
Ice Fishing In Orange County
Ice Fishing in Putnam County
Ice Fishing in Rockland County
Ice Fishing in Sullivan County
Ice Fishing in Ulster County
Ice Fishing in Westchester County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 5 Ice Fishing
Clinton County Ice Fishing
Essex County Ice Fishing
Franklin County Ice Fishing
Fulton County Ice Fishing
Hamilton County Ice Fishing
Saratoga County Ice Fishing
Warren County Ice Fishing
Washington County Ice Fishing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 6 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing Perch Lake
Ice Fishing in Region 6.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 7 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Broome County
Ice Fishing in Cayuga County
Ice Fishing in Chenango County
Ice Fishing in Cortland County
Ice Fishing in Madison County
Ice Fishing in Onondaga County
Ice Fishing in Oswego County
Ice Fishing in Tioga County
Ice Fishing in Tompkins County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 8 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Chemung County
Ice Fishing in Livingston County
Ice Fishing in Monroe County
Ice Fishing in Ontario County
Ice Fishing in Orleans County
Ice Fishing in Schuyler County
Ice Fishing in Seneca County
Ice Fishing in Steuben County
Ice Fishing in Wayne County
Ice Fishing in Yates County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mistershoaf wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

Get a Mora Auger. Getting through the ice quickly mean more fishing and more mobility. If your not catching fish you need to move. Common Ice fishing mistake is not moving. Keeps the blood warm and betters your chances. Anyway, Mora makes a great product. Keep the blades sharp.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dbramley wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

well ice would be good, and an ice pole and some bait

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 5 years 14 weeks ago

Your going to need some short rods and possibly tip-ups, depending on what kind of ice fishing your going to be doing.
Next your going to need an ice auger. If you live somewhere like Minnesota where the ice is frequently over three feet thick, you're not going to want to be caught dead with a hand crank auger. I have had an Eskimo auger for over 10 years and it looks just like the ones that Cabelas is currently rolling off the shelves. I works extremely well and will drill 3 feet of ice in about 15 seconds.
Your going to want some sort of sonar to find structure and depth. If your on a tight budget, the Fishin Buddy series mounted to a 2x4 to set over your hole will work well. If your a high roller, the Vexillar is the way to go.
Once again, depending on your budget, you can get a 5 gallon bucket to sit on, or you could get a pop up ice house with a 20 pound propane tank with a Mr. Heater on it.
That should get you started, and your wife good and pissed off.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Skeeb wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Jigging poles, jigs, wax worms, tip ups, minnows, and the most important ice fishing tool, a case of beer!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from T wrote 5 years 14 weeks ago

Try this site for help-

http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/basicicefishin_tvzi.htm

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Charley wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

The best way to get started is to find someone to go with. See what they are using, then bust the bank buying your own.
Wait until mid- Feb to March when all of the ice inventory goes on sale.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mistershoaf wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

Get a Mora Auger. Getting through the ice quickly mean more fishing and more mobility. If your not catching fish you need to move. Common Ice fishing mistake is not moving. Keeps the blood warm and betters your chances. Anyway, Mora makes a great product. Keep the blades sharp.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice Fishing Basics:
For a first trip, try to pick an opportune weather day -- remember those blustery January days will soon fade into mild February and spring-like March days which often provide some of the most productive ice fishing of the season. Whatever the day you decide to go ice fishing, be sure to check the ice for safety.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

The Waters . . .
Most all ponds and lakes offer ice fishing potential. Their characteristics define the kinds of fish that may be caught. Large, shallower ponds and lakes favor species such as chain pickerel, northern pike, yellow perch and sunfish. Deepwater lakes need to be fished selectively to get good catches of northern pike, walleye or lake trout. Brown trout, rainbow trout and landlocked salmon, where they may legally be taken, are often found in deep lakes, which provide necessary cool temperatures in the summertime. However, when these lakes are ice-covered, trout are frequently caught while cruising just a few feet under the ice. The local tackle shop where you purchase your bait should be able to advise you on where fish are currently being caught.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Cutting the Ice...
Getting through the ice is not as hard as it might seem. There are a variety of tools available that make this "essential task" fairly simple. Perhaps the simplest is an old-fashioned "spud" bar which your grandfather may have used on his ice fishing trips. Spuds are often the cheapest way to cut a hole in the ice and work reasonably well on ice up to about a foot thick. Hand-powered augers, which are slightly more expensive than spud bars, are easy to operate and offer the best all-around compromise for moderate ice conditions. Try to purchase an auger appropriate to the species of fish that you are seeking. Anglers who fish for yellow perch, sunfish and other pan fish frequently favor ice augers 4", 5" or 6" in diameter because of their light weight and the speed that they bore through the ice. Anglers who fish for larger fish, such as trout, lake trout, landlocked salmon and northern pike, frequently prefer an ice auger which will make a larger hole -- an appreciated feature during the often-tricky landing of these large fish. But remember, cutting an 8" hole requires the removal of almost twice as much ice as a 6" hole, so don't buy an ice auger much bigger than you will need. For the avid ice angler or for thicker, more extreme ice conditions, more expensive, gas-powered augers provide the ultimate in speed and convenience, albeit at a sacrifice in weight and portability. Power augers come in diameters up to 10" and the size of the hole makes little difference in the speed or difficulty of cutting the hole.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice Fishing Methods...
Ice fishing methods include "jigging" with short, light fishing rods and using tip-ups. There are many different kinds of jigging poles and tip-ups. Much of the equipment is easy to make.
Jigging involves the use of a jigging rod or hand line and a small jigging spoon or lure which is often "sweetened" with a piece of bait. The jig is designed to dart around in different directions when it is jerked up and down by the angler.
The tip-up is basically a spool on a stick holding a baited line suspended through a hole in the ice. When the bait - usually a minnow - is taken by a fish, the pull on the line releases a signal, such as a red flag.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Clothing...
For safe ice fishing outings, anglers need to be well prepared. Proper clothing is critical because most people do not move around much while ice fishing. Dress warmly, paying extra attention to your head, feet and hands - dressing in layers is essential.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Ice safety...
Safe ice is the number one consideration. A minimum of three to four inches of solid ice is the general rule for safety. Ice thickness, however, is not uniform on any body of water. The guidelines presented here are based on clear, blue, hard ice on non-running waters. Remember, your own good judgement is essential!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

And, last but not least, the fishing regulations...
In New York State, general angling regulations limit anglers to two jigging lines (or hand lines) and five tip-ups in most waters. Each tip-up must be marked with the operator's name and address; the operator must be in immediate attendance when the lines are in the water. Since special regulations apply on many waters, review the current fishing regulations guide when planning an ice fishing trip - and don't forget your current year's fishing license. To identify good ice fishing waters in the area where you plan to fish, contact the DEC Regional Fisheries Office for that area.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 3 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Dutchess County
Ice Fishing In Orange County
Ice Fishing in Putnam County
Ice Fishing in Rockland County
Ice Fishing in Sullivan County
Ice Fishing in Ulster County
Ice Fishing in Westchester County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 5 Ice Fishing
Clinton County Ice Fishing
Essex County Ice Fishing
Franklin County Ice Fishing
Fulton County Ice Fishing
Hamilton County Ice Fishing
Saratoga County Ice Fishing
Warren County Ice Fishing
Washington County Ice Fishing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 6 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing Perch Lake
Ice Fishing in Region 6.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 7 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Broome County
Ice Fishing in Cayuga County
Ice Fishing in Chenango County
Ice Fishing in Cortland County
Ice Fishing in Madison County
Ice Fishing in Onondaga County
Ice Fishing in Oswego County
Ice Fishing in Tioga County
Ice Fishing in Tompkins County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Region 8 Ice Fishing
Ice Fishing in Chemung County
Ice Fishing in Livingston County
Ice Fishing in Monroe County
Ice Fishing in Ontario County
Ice Fishing in Orleans County
Ice Fishing in Schuyler County
Ice Fishing in Seneca County
Ice Fishing in Steuben County
Ice Fishing in Wayne County
Ice Fishing in Yates County.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dbramley wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

well ice would be good, and an ice pole and some bait

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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