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Q:
Playing with the idea of a cobia fishing trip sometime this year. Are they fit to eat, and if so, how do you prepare them? Thanks much, stay warm!

Question by 007. Uploaded on January 08, 2010

Answers (10)

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from country road wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

They are one of the best tasting fish in the sea---I prefer them over snapper, grouper, scamp and pompano. One of their local names is lemonfish beause they have a faint taste of lemon. They are fine any way they are cooked; fried, baked, broiled or grilled. I never tried to boil cobia meat, but it would probably be good that way, too. The only caveat I have about cooking them is, if you fry them, don't cut the portions too thick---the meat is dense and cooks better in 1/2 inch steaks. I wish you good luck on your trip---sight fishing for cobia on their spring migration can be one of the finest sports around. Will you be fishing on the Gulf Coast?

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from 007 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Cheseapeake Bay.

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from country road wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

I've never fished for cobia the way they do in the Cheseapeake, but they are a fine fighting game fish, no matter how you catch them, it's just a shame they aren't prettier. All my experience with catching them has been off the coast of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle where we cruise up and down the beach and look for them as they travel east to west in March and April. A word of caution: they have a habit of fighting harder once you get them in the boat as they do in the water, so it's a good idea to have a preacher handy or get them directly into the fish box and sit on the lid.

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from Cgull wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Great tasting fish, Ive neve cooked them any way other than breaded and fried. The Cheseapeake must have somoe good fishing, I knew it held all types of fish but never knew it help ling / cobia. Some times they can be so finiky, swimming right up to my ribbon fish and doing a lip curl before truning away for better looking bait.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Cobia Recipes :)
Ingredients:
Cobia Fillets or Steaks - cut into serving size pieces (preferably ¾” to 1” thick)
Olive Oil
1 part butter Butter (about 1/3 cup)
2 parts Balsamic Vinegar (about 2/3 cup)
Fresh Lemon Juice
Salt & freshly cracked black pepper

Preparation :)
While the grill is getting hot sprinkle both sides of each piece of fish with a little lemon juice, olive oil, and salt & pepper..In a small sauce pan over medium-low heat melt the butter along with the balsamic vinegar stirring until well blended..Remove this from the heat when the sauce has emulsified (thickened)...
When the grill is at its hottest, carefully (and quickly) place the fish onto the grill..Cook for 2 minutes then carefully turn the fish over..While the second side is cooking gently dab some of the balsamic butter onto each piece of fish..(Note: I used a BBQ Mop for this..The idea is to glaze the fish without brushing off the seasonings but move quickly :)
Turn the fish again after 2 minutes on the second side, quickly dab again with the balsamic glaze.. Remove the fish from the grill and check for doneness, it should be “barely” cooked through as it will continue cooking after it comes off the fire...
Enjoy it and serve it to your family!!!

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from gatorb8t wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

One of the best eating fish you will ever have!plus they are really fun to catch,especially on lite-tackle.We would spot fish for them just off the coast when the mantarays were runing,or anytime we would see some type of cover.Try it broiled w/butter,garlic and a sprinkle of old bay. YUM YUM... besure to bake for a few minutes before broiling to ensure proper cooking.Good Luck with your trip.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

They are great eating! Lots of great recipes... one of my simple favorites is to cube them in small chunks, dip them in egg/milk batter and then roll the chunk in crushed saltine crackers with lemmon pepper. Deep fry them in boiling oil. Not low fat but boy are they GOOD. Be sure to test your knots because they PULL and you might just hit one over 100 pounds. Good luck and have fun!

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

rudy, I used to do King Salmon the same way in AK!

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from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

They are a great tablefare ,the only way i have cooked them is over charcoal.prepare fish and make a marinade of 10% dales steak seasoning and90% italion salad dressing salt and pepper to taste.flip the bags occasionally to insure the even distribution some snapper throat throwed in and put on hot grill turning often to keep from burning. The cobia has a firmness of a steak firm meat have some extra marinade for a sauce and you have some great eating.They love anything floating they will hide under boats a tideline of grass and trash i've even seen them hide under a sea turtle.They are liable to be running under a school of mullet,they love company.climb up on the highest point of the boat with some good optics and you can find them.then you have to get them to bite.Good Luck no only in catching but in the eating.The Gulf has great Cobia /Ling/lemonfish/Good eating

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from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

Cobias are excellent to eat. They are practically extinct in the Gulf, due to commercial fishing with nets. Don't even bother to go there.

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from country road wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

They are one of the best tasting fish in the sea---I prefer them over snapper, grouper, scamp and pompano. One of their local names is lemonfish beause they have a faint taste of lemon. They are fine any way they are cooked; fried, baked, broiled or grilled. I never tried to boil cobia meat, but it would probably be good that way, too. The only caveat I have about cooking them is, if you fry them, don't cut the portions too thick---the meat is dense and cooks better in 1/2 inch steaks. I wish you good luck on your trip---sight fishing for cobia on their spring migration can be one of the finest sports around. Will you be fishing on the Gulf Coast?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

I've never fished for cobia the way they do in the Cheseapeake, but they are a fine fighting game fish, no matter how you catch them, it's just a shame they aren't prettier. All my experience with catching them has been off the coast of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle where we cruise up and down the beach and look for them as they travel east to west in March and April. A word of caution: they have a habit of fighting harder once you get them in the boat as they do in the water, so it's a good idea to have a preacher handy or get them directly into the fish box and sit on the lid.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Great tasting fish, Ive neve cooked them any way other than breaded and fried. The Cheseapeake must have somoe good fishing, I knew it held all types of fish but never knew it help ling / cobia. Some times they can be so finiky, swimming right up to my ribbon fish and doing a lip curl before truning away for better looking bait.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Cobia Recipes :)
Ingredients:
Cobia Fillets or Steaks - cut into serving size pieces (preferably ¾” to 1” thick)
Olive Oil
1 part butter Butter (about 1/3 cup)
2 parts Balsamic Vinegar (about 2/3 cup)
Fresh Lemon Juice
Salt & freshly cracked black pepper

Preparation :)
While the grill is getting hot sprinkle both sides of each piece of fish with a little lemon juice, olive oil, and salt & pepper..In a small sauce pan over medium-low heat melt the butter along with the balsamic vinegar stirring until well blended..Remove this from the heat when the sauce has emulsified (thickened)...
When the grill is at its hottest, carefully (and quickly) place the fish onto the grill..Cook for 2 minutes then carefully turn the fish over..While the second side is cooking gently dab some of the balsamic butter onto each piece of fish..(Note: I used a BBQ Mop for this..The idea is to glaze the fish without brushing off the seasonings but move quickly :)
Turn the fish again after 2 minutes on the second side, quickly dab again with the balsamic glaze.. Remove the fish from the grill and check for doneness, it should be “barely” cooked through as it will continue cooking after it comes off the fire...
Enjoy it and serve it to your family!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gatorb8t wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

One of the best eating fish you will ever have!plus they are really fun to catch,especially on lite-tackle.We would spot fish for them just off the coast when the mantarays were runing,or anytime we would see some type of cover.Try it broiled w/butter,garlic and a sprinkle of old bay. YUM YUM... besure to bake for a few minutes before broiling to ensure proper cooking.Good Luck with your trip.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Cheseapeake Bay.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

They are great eating! Lots of great recipes... one of my simple favorites is to cube them in small chunks, dip them in egg/milk batter and then roll the chunk in crushed saltine crackers with lemmon pepper. Deep fry them in boiling oil. Not low fat but boy are they GOOD. Be sure to test your knots because they PULL and you might just hit one over 100 pounds. Good luck and have fun!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

rudy, I used to do King Salmon the same way in AK!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

They are a great tablefare ,the only way i have cooked them is over charcoal.prepare fish and make a marinade of 10% dales steak seasoning and90% italion salad dressing salt and pepper to taste.flip the bags occasionally to insure the even distribution some snapper throat throwed in and put on hot grill turning often to keep from burning. The cobia has a firmness of a steak firm meat have some extra marinade for a sauce and you have some great eating.They love anything floating they will hide under boats a tideline of grass and trash i've even seen them hide under a sea turtle.They are liable to be running under a school of mullet,they love company.climb up on the highest point of the boat with some good optics and you can find them.then you have to get them to bite.Good Luck no only in catching but in the eating.The Gulf has great Cobia /Ling/lemonfish/Good eating

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

Cobias are excellent to eat. They are practically extinct in the Gulf, due to commercial fishing with nets. Don't even bother to go there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer