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Q:
What's the difference between #6, #7.5, and #8 shot? Which one should I use in a 20 gauge for duck hunting?

Question by pascal. Uploaded on May 15, 2009

Answers (13)

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from PotterMan96 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

The difference is that the larger the number the more bbs it has in it and the smaller the bbs are. With small numbers like #6 the are less bbs and they are bigger.

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from matouse3 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

The higher the number- the smaller the shot size. You should not use anything smaller than 6 for ducks. I use 4 and larger just due to the fact that I might see a goose if their in season as well.

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from matouse3 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

I'm even not sure if I have even seen 7.5 and 8 in steel?

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from shane wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Use 4.

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from Big O wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Yep, everybodys right. I use 4's in a 12ga. but I shoot flooded timber.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Like they all say... don't use any of these size 6 and smaller shot types. They are way to small to penetrate something as tough as a duck. They also slow down way too fast to get any range. Use at least size 4 steel shot, even larger if you need to shoot at longer distances.

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from jbird wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I agree w/ matous3, good luck hunting!

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from BamaCreekBum wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I hunt in a rie field and I use #1 to #4 shot in 12 gauge.

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from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I would use nothing more than a #5 shot but a #4 shot would be ideal for ducks.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

If you are shooting steel for big ducks and geese we use #2 most of the time in Kansas. I'v even used 2's on pheasants where NT shot is required. With a 20 you are handicapped by low shot volume and probably should go with #4. Just don't take long shots. On the goose line at Cheyenne Bottoms for pass shooting BBB,BB and T shot is the name of the game (10 and 12 ga. only). They do make #7 steel and I have shot doves with it. Compared to lead it sucks.

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from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Difference? Size. Duck Huntability? None of those sizes (with the rare exception of high density 6 shot) should be used for ducks. For Ducks, I use 3" or 3.5" BB-2 shot, depending on what I'm doing and if Geese are a possibility.

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from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I would recommend #2-#6; depending on what size of duck you are hunting.

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from Skeeb wrote 4 years 44 weeks ago

You shouldn't even use a 20 ga for ducks...you need a 12.

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from matouse3 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

I'm even not sure if I have even seen 7.5 and 8 in steel?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Skeeb wrote 4 years 44 weeks ago

You shouldn't even use a 20 ga for ducks...you need a 12.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PotterMan96 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

The difference is that the larger the number the more bbs it has in it and the smaller the bbs are. With small numbers like #6 the are less bbs and they are bigger.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from matouse3 wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

The higher the number- the smaller the shot size. You should not use anything smaller than 6 for ducks. I use 4 and larger just due to the fact that I might see a goose if their in season as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Use 4.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 48 weeks ago

Yep, everybodys right. I use 4's in a 12ga. but I shoot flooded timber.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Like they all say... don't use any of these size 6 and smaller shot types. They are way to small to penetrate something as tough as a duck. They also slow down way too fast to get any range. Use at least size 4 steel shot, even larger if you need to shoot at longer distances.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I agree w/ matous3, good luck hunting!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BamaCreekBum wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I hunt in a rie field and I use #1 to #4 shot in 12 gauge.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I would use nothing more than a #5 shot but a #4 shot would be ideal for ducks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

If you are shooting steel for big ducks and geese we use #2 most of the time in Kansas. I'v even used 2's on pheasants where NT shot is required. With a 20 you are handicapped by low shot volume and probably should go with #4. Just don't take long shots. On the goose line at Cheyenne Bottoms for pass shooting BBB,BB and T shot is the name of the game (10 and 12 ga. only). They do make #7 steel and I have shot doves with it. Compared to lead it sucks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Difference? Size. Duck Huntability? None of those sizes (with the rare exception of high density 6 shot) should be used for ducks. For Ducks, I use 3" or 3.5" BB-2 shot, depending on what I'm doing and if Geese are a possibility.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I would recommend #2-#6; depending on what size of duck you are hunting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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