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Q:
i have heard that if you sight a gun in at seven yards it should be dead on at one hundred...does anyone know if this is true it sounds like BS to me

Question by PSEbowhunter. Uploaded on December 18, 2009

Answers (16)

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

That distance varies for the gun. For my 30-06 it's 25 yards. It's not BS. Almost all guns have an arcing tragectory (some flatter than others - see my comments on the 45-70 elk guns). The idea is to catch the bullet at the early end of the arc and it will be back on at the back end as well. By the way, this arcing trajectory is what makes it so difficult to shoot downhill. Some of the effect of gravity is lost and the arc gets distorted, causing the bullet to strike higher (sometimes MUCH higher) than it normally would at the same range on flat ground.

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from bobcat.trapper.95 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

the other day in math class we did a math problem on this...actually it works depending on the gun

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Many rifles will first cross the line of sight (LOS) at aomewhere between 25-27 yards and again out about 200 yards (ZERO), depending on the cartridge and how high the sight/scope is above the bore. Even a slow 200 grain .358 Winchester will be -0.75 inches low at 7 yards for a 100 yard ZERO. Play around with a ballistics program and see the various forces effect on trajectory. There are lots of free ones online.

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from Cgull wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

a gun can be on at 7 yrds and way off at 100. 25 yards is a good place to start zeroing, as stated above once your scope is on at 25 you'll be closer to zero at 100 and 200 yards because of the arc.

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from ARhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

idk depends on caliber maybe like a flatter shooting .270 or 7mm 08 but on like a 30-06 i wouldnt depend on it.

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from shermanator wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

we always sight in guns at 25 and then we found that they are on at a 100 and just low at 200 but not by much

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from 99explorer wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

The rule of thumb (after bore-sighting the rifle)is to adjust the sight setting at 25 yards for all calibers, but don't count on any sight setting being "dead on" at 100 yards. You will be on paper at that actual distance, and final adjustments will have to be made for the trajectory or your choice (one, two or three inches high, or "dead on" if you prefer).

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from 99explorer wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

As an afterthought, I should add that these short-range sight settings are just steps in the procedure of properly sighting in a a rifle, and should not be considered a satisfactory shortcut, or substitute for the real thing.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

ARhunter

There is little difference in the trajectory of those 3 cartridges at 25 and 200 yards. With a 140 grain BT for the .270 and 7mm-08 and a 150 grain BT for the .30-06, the .30-06 drops only 2/10ths of an inch more at 200 yards with a 100 yard zero than the 270 and 3/10ths LESS than the 7mm-08.

At all ranges with a comparable weight and design bullet, the .30-06 beats the 7mm-08 like a drum! The .30-06 drops only 0.5 inch more than the .270 at 300 yards! Your statement regarding the .30-06 is all wet, based on supposition rather than fact!

RANGE MONKEY ALERT!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

99explore is bang on. The short-sighting is only a step along the way to sighting it in at the desired "routine" distance (100 to 200 yards, depending on the gun). I don't own a spotting scope so this "shortcut" is invaluable in saving time and ammunition to reach that final objective. Otherwise I'd be doing an awful lot of walking to and fro after every shot. Twenty-five yards is a lot easier to cover walking than two hundred yards.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Bottom line check the sighting out to the longest range you expect to take a shot at. Listen to the above most is good advice.

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

It is BS. If you want your gun to be dead on at 100 yards, then shoot it at 100 yards.

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from the cowboy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

yea right! it all depends on the ammo, bullet weight, and type of caliber. my .357 marlin is very inferior to the ballistics of a .243, meaning a .243 might shoot the same at 7 yards and 100, but a .357 traveling at 1200 fps will definitly not hit the same. Dont guess, know your gun BEFORE you hunt.

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from Joevols wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

My thoughts exactly BioGuy!

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from jwallen wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

We usually shoot at 27 yards after we bore sight all of our center fires and the move out to 100 and adjust them to 2.5" high, plus or minus an inch and then that puts us on or nearly so out at 200. A few years ago I purchased a CZ 30-06/12 Ga. combination gun. We mounted the scope and bore sighted it and when we fired it for the first time at 27 yards the round was about 2.5 inches low. We adjusted it up and got it on at 27 then moved it out to 100 and fired a three shot group which measured about 1.5 inches but was almost 6 inches high! What gives? Then I slapped my forehead in one of those "shouda had a V-8" moments. Because the lower barrel was the 30-06 and the centerline axis of the bore was almost 3 inches below the line of sight the correct point had to be at 50 yards to have it 2.5 inches high at 100 and so on. This only for initial sighting in and to truly know you should shoot your rifle at 25 yard increments out to the maximum range that you will shoot. Have I confused you yet?

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

While there is a difference in ballistics because of different ammo, you can get pretty specific targets.

for .223 and the like, you can get the "1000-inch" targets. It was a phase the Army went through some years ago. The targets had an extra small square on them. The theory was if you sighted in on the bull, and was accurate, the round would hit the extra spot.

There was another type I used for .308 like that.

Here's a link to a selection of short-range Military and Police zeroing targets...

http://speedwelltargets.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6_8

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

That distance varies for the gun. For my 30-06 it's 25 yards. It's not BS. Almost all guns have an arcing tragectory (some flatter than others - see my comments on the 45-70 elk guns). The idea is to catch the bullet at the early end of the arc and it will be back on at the back end as well. By the way, this arcing trajectory is what makes it so difficult to shoot downhill. Some of the effect of gravity is lost and the arc gets distorted, causing the bullet to strike higher (sometimes MUCH higher) than it normally would at the same range on flat ground.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from bobcat.trapper.95 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

the other day in math class we did a math problem on this...actually it works depending on the gun

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Many rifles will first cross the line of sight (LOS) at aomewhere between 25-27 yards and again out about 200 yards (ZERO), depending on the cartridge and how high the sight/scope is above the bore. Even a slow 200 grain .358 Winchester will be -0.75 inches low at 7 yards for a 100 yard ZERO. Play around with a ballistics program and see the various forces effect on trajectory. There are lots of free ones online.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

a gun can be on at 7 yrds and way off at 100. 25 yards is a good place to start zeroing, as stated above once your scope is on at 25 you'll be closer to zero at 100 and 200 yards because of the arc.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

The rule of thumb (after bore-sighting the rifle)is to adjust the sight setting at 25 yards for all calibers, but don't count on any sight setting being "dead on" at 100 yards. You will be on paper at that actual distance, and final adjustments will have to be made for the trajectory or your choice (one, two or three inches high, or "dead on" if you prefer).

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

ARhunter

There is little difference in the trajectory of those 3 cartridges at 25 and 200 yards. With a 140 grain BT for the .270 and 7mm-08 and a 150 grain BT for the .30-06, the .30-06 drops only 2/10ths of an inch more at 200 yards with a 100 yard zero than the 270 and 3/10ths LESS than the 7mm-08.

At all ranges with a comparable weight and design bullet, the .30-06 beats the 7mm-08 like a drum! The .30-06 drops only 0.5 inch more than the .270 at 300 yards! Your statement regarding the .30-06 is all wet, based on supposition rather than fact!

RANGE MONKEY ALERT!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

99explore is bang on. The short-sighting is only a step along the way to sighting it in at the desired "routine" distance (100 to 200 yards, depending on the gun). I don't own a spotting scope so this "shortcut" is invaluable in saving time and ammunition to reach that final objective. Otherwise I'd be doing an awful lot of walking to and fro after every shot. Twenty-five yards is a lot easier to cover walking than two hundred yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ARhunter wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

idk depends on caliber maybe like a flatter shooting .270 or 7mm 08 but on like a 30-06 i wouldnt depend on it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shermanator wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

we always sight in guns at 25 and then we found that they are on at a 100 and just low at 200 but not by much

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

As an afterthought, I should add that these short-range sight settings are just steps in the procedure of properly sighting in a a rifle, and should not be considered a satisfactory shortcut, or substitute for the real thing.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Bottom line check the sighting out to the longest range you expect to take a shot at. Listen to the above most is good advice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

It is BS. If you want your gun to be dead on at 100 yards, then shoot it at 100 yards.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from the cowboy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

yea right! it all depends on the ammo, bullet weight, and type of caliber. my .357 marlin is very inferior to the ballistics of a .243, meaning a .243 might shoot the same at 7 yards and 100, but a .357 traveling at 1200 fps will definitly not hit the same. Dont guess, know your gun BEFORE you hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joevols wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

My thoughts exactly BioGuy!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jwallen wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

We usually shoot at 27 yards after we bore sight all of our center fires and the move out to 100 and adjust them to 2.5" high, plus or minus an inch and then that puts us on or nearly so out at 200. A few years ago I purchased a CZ 30-06/12 Ga. combination gun. We mounted the scope and bore sighted it and when we fired it for the first time at 27 yards the round was about 2.5 inches low. We adjusted it up and got it on at 27 then moved it out to 100 and fired a three shot group which measured about 1.5 inches but was almost 6 inches high! What gives? Then I slapped my forehead in one of those "shouda had a V-8" moments. Because the lower barrel was the 30-06 and the centerline axis of the bore was almost 3 inches below the line of sight the correct point had to be at 50 yards to have it 2.5 inches high at 100 and so on. This only for initial sighting in and to truly know you should shoot your rifle at 25 yard increments out to the maximum range that you will shoot. Have I confused you yet?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

While there is a difference in ballistics because of different ammo, you can get pretty specific targets.

for .223 and the like, you can get the "1000-inch" targets. It was a phase the Army went through some years ago. The targets had an extra small square on them. The theory was if you sighted in on the bull, and was accurate, the round would hit the extra spot.

There was another type I used for .308 like that.

Here's a link to a selection of short-range Military and Police zeroing targets...

http://speedwelltargets.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6_8

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer