Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
What does the term raghorn mean? i have heard a lot of people use this phrase for elk smaller than a 5 point but why RAG horn?

Question by jeffo52284. Uploaded on November 29, 2009

Answers (14)

Top Rated
All Answers
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A combination of the words rag and horn, this term is thought to describe the animals as non-prime trophy specimens, i.e. "rags". Another explanation is that it is descriptive of how the new antlers have a velvety covering that sloughs off each year and can hang like rags.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/raghorn

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds Oxymoron!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from kdklaas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Great question, so I looked it up in the Wiktionary - Hope this helps -

raghorn

Definition from Wiktionary,English

Etymology combination of the words rag and horn, this term is thought to describe the animals as non-prime trophy specimens, i.e. "rags". Another explanation is that it is descriptive of how the new antlers have a velvety covering that sloughs off each year and can hang like rags.

NounSingular
raghorn
Plural
raghorns

raghorn (plural raghorns)

(idiomatic, US) Any male elk (bull) with antlers between one and six points, non-inclusive, on either side. Also called an "intermediate bull" (bulls with two, three, four or five points on either side).
Retrieved from "http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/raghorn"

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Raghorn = freezer elk, taken by only a small percentage of elk hunters. Usually about 200 pounds larger than a young cow of the species. Opposite of holding out for a trophy, which are taken by an even smaller percentage of elk hunters!

Sorry, could not resist....

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Ragged(non-symmetrical)(how's THAT $10.00 word)(lol).
That is the way it was explained to me the first time.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from kdklaas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I couldn't believe I found a definition. I was pretty much inline with Big O on my initial reply...

Ragged, spindly.

To put it simply - a raghorn's mama won't miss him.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from babsfish4life wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A spike elk is a trophy, a raghorn is a trophy, a mature bull is a trophy. An elk is a trophy if it doesn't have a ear tag (farmed). Anybody that gives me a -1 knows nothing about elk hunting.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Take "babsfish4life"s answer. There is a young feller that knows about elk hunting!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

WA Mtnhunter

The term Raghorn reminds me of some of the hunters I've came across. LOL!

Hat on backwards, gun slung over the shoulder holding it by the muzzle and don't have a clue what their doing asking you at 8:30 am looking up at you in your stand yelling, HAVE YOU SEEN ANYTHING YET!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper,

I thought we only had those types in Georgia. Looks like the darned things are spreading faster than whitetails moving west!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Clay

Are you sure that ain't one of dem dar 'TINHORNS'?

LOL

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

According the the White Mountain Apache Tribe, a raghorn elk is a bull having a maximum of four points on either beam with no broken points or beam.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 268bull wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Here in Oregon we refer to a raghorn as a young bull sporting his first set of branch antlers following having spikes. They are generally unevenly opposed,say three or four points on one side, and two on the other side. A shooter none the less.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A raghorn is often a spike bull and certainly no more than two and a half years old. Any branched antler bull with tiny branched antlers is considered a raghorn. I have shot and seen plenty of spike-aged bulls (i.e. 1.5 years old) with brow tines and even a few points. They are "spikes" nonetheless as defined by their age (easily determined by examining their canine ivories which will be nearly full size but entirely white). These animals are certainly not going to be 200 lbs heavier than the mature cow that bore them. I have really been unable to see any difference in the size of a spike or its female sibling. A 2.5 year old raghorn would not be significantly larger than the typical calf-bearing cow. A young five-point (one side count) is typically 3.5 years old and may be slightly larger than some of the cows he's running with. The major physical difference at this age (besides antlers) will be the color of the hides. The bulls start to develop that distinctive light blonde color as opposed to the darker cows. I think the term raghorn refers to the typical ragged, unbalanced appearance of the antlers on bulls at this stage. They are seldom even remotely symetrical. But the same bull three years down the road might have a beautifully symetrical rack. That junk above from the dictionary was probably written by some dimestore hunting guide. All bulls, large and small, will have "rags" of velvet hanging from their horns at some stage of their annual production.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from babsfish4life wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A spike elk is a trophy, a raghorn is a trophy, a mature bull is a trophy. An elk is a trophy if it doesn't have a ear tag (farmed). Anybody that gives me a -1 knows nothing about elk hunting.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A combination of the words rag and horn, this term is thought to describe the animals as non-prime trophy specimens, i.e. "rags". Another explanation is that it is descriptive of how the new antlers have a velvety covering that sloughs off each year and can hang like rags.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/raghorn

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from kdklaas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Great question, so I looked it up in the Wiktionary - Hope this helps -

raghorn

Definition from Wiktionary,English

Etymology combination of the words rag and horn, this term is thought to describe the animals as non-prime trophy specimens, i.e. "rags". Another explanation is that it is descriptive of how the new antlers have a velvety covering that sloughs off each year and can hang like rags.

NounSingular
raghorn
Plural
raghorns

raghorn (plural raghorns)

(idiomatic, US) Any male elk (bull) with antlers between one and six points, non-inclusive, on either side. Also called an "intermediate bull" (bulls with two, three, four or five points on either side).
Retrieved from "http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/raghorn"

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Raghorn = freezer elk, taken by only a small percentage of elk hunters. Usually about 200 pounds larger than a young cow of the species. Opposite of holding out for a trophy, which are taken by an even smaller percentage of elk hunters!

Sorry, could not resist....

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Ragged(non-symmetrical)(how's THAT $10.00 word)(lol).
That is the way it was explained to me the first time.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds Oxymoron!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from kdklaas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I couldn't believe I found a definition. I was pretty much inline with Big O on my initial reply...

Ragged, spindly.

To put it simply - a raghorn's mama won't miss him.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Take "babsfish4life"s answer. There is a young feller that knows about elk hunting!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

WA Mtnhunter

The term Raghorn reminds me of some of the hunters I've came across. LOL!

Hat on backwards, gun slung over the shoulder holding it by the muzzle and don't have a clue what their doing asking you at 8:30 am looking up at you in your stand yelling, HAVE YOU SEEN ANYTHING YET!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Mr. Cooper,

I thought we only had those types in Georgia. Looks like the darned things are spreading faster than whitetails moving west!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Clay

Are you sure that ain't one of dem dar 'TINHORNS'?

LOL

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

According the the White Mountain Apache Tribe, a raghorn elk is a bull having a maximum of four points on either beam with no broken points or beam.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 268bull wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Here in Oregon we refer to a raghorn as a young bull sporting his first set of branch antlers following having spikes. They are generally unevenly opposed,say three or four points on one side, and two on the other side. A shooter none the less.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A raghorn is often a spike bull and certainly no more than two and a half years old. Any branched antler bull with tiny branched antlers is considered a raghorn. I have shot and seen plenty of spike-aged bulls (i.e. 1.5 years old) with brow tines and even a few points. They are "spikes" nonetheless as defined by their age (easily determined by examining their canine ivories which will be nearly full size but entirely white). These animals are certainly not going to be 200 lbs heavier than the mature cow that bore them. I have really been unable to see any difference in the size of a spike or its female sibling. A 2.5 year old raghorn would not be significantly larger than the typical calf-bearing cow. A young five-point (one side count) is typically 3.5 years old and may be slightly larger than some of the cows he's running with. The major physical difference at this age (besides antlers) will be the color of the hides. The bulls start to develop that distinctive light blonde color as opposed to the darker cows. I think the term raghorn refers to the typical ragged, unbalanced appearance of the antlers on bulls at this stage. They are seldom even remotely symetrical. But the same bull three years down the road might have a beautifully symetrical rack. That junk above from the dictionary was probably written by some dimestore hunting guide. All bulls, large and small, will have "rags" of velvet hanging from their horns at some stage of their annual production.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer