Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
what are the best 7mm rem mag bullets for elk?

Question by ernyuma. Uploaded on May 27, 2009

Answers (19)

Top Rated
All Answers
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

For the 7mm Rem Mag, I would go with the 150 or 160 grain Nosler Partition. I’ve found 175’s are too heavy and don’t have the punch and the range as the 160.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'd say a good 160 gr. is your best bet. Take your pick...whatever shoots well in your gun.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom donohue wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

i shoot a MK1 ruger with 24 inch barrel 7mm rem mag. it just loves the new Federal Fusion in 175 gr. best of all its a great deal $ wise.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm with Clay. If you or your rifle don't like Partitions, try 160 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw or Barnes Triple Shocks. A 175 grain bullet is too heavy to get good velocity. A good .30-06 180 grain load is better than a 7mm Rem Mag 175 gr.

I have heard mixed reviews on Fusion loads. My son's rifle does not shoot them very well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My son and I have been shooting 160 grain Speer Mag-Tips in our 7 mags for whitetails and were told by a neighbor with elk experience that they would be much better for elk, that we would be better suited with something along the line of a 150 grain ballistic tip.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I agree WAmtnhuntr, have heard of many who were not impressed with the Fusion line. Haven't tried them personally.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

For years I used 160 Partitions with good effect although an occassional followup shot was necessary to expedite the finalization of the matter. More recently I have switched to Berger 168 gr VLD bullets for several 7 mm rifles. They are very accurate and offer excellent one shot stop performance at long ranges. I cannot speak of their effect concerning close shots as the situatioon has not presented itself. In the 500 + yard range the elk or deer has always just taken the bullet in the boiler and usually sits down and rolls over. So far every bullet has passed completely through the animal so I don't have any recovered bullets to show you. Exit wounds are not considerably larger than entry so that tells us something. Sometimes the Partitions could be located in the hide on the offside of entry. In reality I would be happy with almost any of the preminum projectiles and probably most of the so called standard bullets on deer or elk from a 7 mm. Even better is a .338 of any type.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I should add don't use fragile bullets like Nosler Ballistic Tips and others in that grouping since they tend to come apart well in advance of when adequate penetration is required.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from CableGuy81 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I shot my first Antelope at 400yds with Winchester Supreme 7MM Mag 160 Grain Accubond, I know you said you try to steer clear of rounds like this, but i have never had a issue. I split a bowling ball in half with 2 shots from 100yrds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm just a bit reluctant on the ballistic tips in the 7 mag. We got to talk to Bob Faulkrod a few years back and he said he used them in a .300 Win Mag on large game with good results, he thought maybe Nosler had toughened up the jacket a bit. I've used them with good results in a 10" T/C .30 Herret but then that's a lot slower too. Back to the 7, I'm not really sure what I'll go to, if anything, at this point. So long as I do my part, the mag-tips do theirs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

007

I handload 160 gr Speer Mag Tips for my son's 7 mm Rem Mag for practice in place of the pricey Federal TBBC. I picked that bullet due to it's similar shape and B.C. to the TBBC. The load I have shoots to the same POI as the Federal load (+/- an inch).

Year before last, he got the Mag Tips and factory TBBC mixed up and took a fine 6x6 bull and a big bodied mule deer with the Mag Tips. We were so pleased with the performance of the TBBC on those two animals that we were shocked when I discovered the mix-up! Mag-Tips might be a good non-Krugerrand bulet!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My old Interarms shoots them well and according to John Wooters years ago, 160 grains is the optimal weight for the 7 mag, so I will probably stay with the mag tips.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigBboy25 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I'd suggest a 160 grain Nosler Partition or accubond, ,but I have had unbelievable results with the 168 grain Berger VLD in my 7mm Mag. The only problem with them is they are a little harder to work a load up for, But once you find one, man do they shoot!!! Steer clear of Sierra GameKings

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ltorote wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I do not know about elk, but stay away from the Winchester silver ballastic tip at short ranges (within 100 yards.) These bullets come apart too much at that high speed and completely ruined the entry shoulder, and most of the opposite side shoulder (I have changed from rib shots to high shoulder shots for longer ranges, and it is just habit to aim high shoulder even when closer.) Though they are accurate out of my Bar 7mm rem mag, usually under 1" MOA at the range, they just tear up too much meat unless shooting over 150 yds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pecos Flats wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I have been known to use a Mag-Tip or Grand Slam in 7mm Rem mag for Elk with equally good results. Both mu favorite 7mm projectile designs at a really reasonable price.
I am not sure how some deduce that you give up that much velocity with the 175 grain pill compared to the 160 grain.
By "carefully" working up a load, it is quite easy to get 2900 fps out of the fore mentioned 175 grainer. In my experience, that is only about 100 fps slower than respective 160 grain bullets. Again, Mag-Tip and Grand Slam.
The 175 grainer seems to offer deeper penetration when taking a less than perfect angling shot.
The 160 grain offers a little more in the way of trajectory, but you will not really notice it unless you are shooting at longer ranges past 400 or 450 yards.
All things are relative when it comes to physics.
Of course, their are a myriad of quality bullets out there in the weight that works best for your purposes!
Bottom line is you really can not go wrong with either weight for the bigger critters.
However, my two-cents is this . . . keep your 7mm for a nice back up rifle and get yourself a good .338 Win Mag and stoke it with 225 grain pills for Elk and such!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

Agreed with ishawooa and + 1 for you sir!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WBM wrote 2 years 32 weeks ago

A good .30-06 180 grain load is better than a 7mm Rem Mag 175 gr.

Why does this mythology persist.

Let's take a 180g Sierra BTSP with a BC=.505 and push it at 2800fps...Hodgdon's max out of a 24" barrel. At 1000 yards the bullet is at 1312fps with 688ftlbs of energy and drops -300"

Next take a 175g Sierra BTSP with a BC=550 and push it at 2800fps...again Hodgdon's max out of a 24" barrel. At 1000 yards the bullet is at 1428fps
with 781ftlbs of energy and drops -278"

How is the 30-06 better?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Terry Fett wrote 37 weeks 1 hour ago

30.06 180 versus 175 grain 7 rem Mag. The 7 is much faster down range than anything comparable in the 06. I shoot 160 Accubonds at 3112 fps with an ES of 5 fps. Deadly accurate. Sighted N to S. The 06 has an impressive record but given equal time in the field allows the 7 to run away with more kills. Use 168 VLD's or 180 VLDs and the 7 outruns the 30-378, 338 and 300 at extreme distances. See Gunwerks for more info/truth. The 7 is one of the deadliest and accurate bullets there is especially when pushed out a 26, 28 or 30 inch barrel using Extreme powders like Retumbo. My preference is a finely tuned original Sendero.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Terry Fett wrote 37 weeks 1 hour ago

From Gunwerks: For North American big game the 7mm diameter bullets have much higher BC's than the
30's or the 338's (for reasonable hunting weight bullets). The cartridge I described earlier
launches the 7mm 168 grain Berger VLD at only 3050 fps, and yet it still has more retained
velocity at 1000 yards than the 300 RUM with a 165 grain bullet starting at 3360! This
kind of velocity can be achieved safely in the 7mm Remington Magnum case with
Hodgdon's Retumbo powder—that's right a 7mm Remington Magnum outperforms the 300
Remington Ultra Mag at 1000 yards! The difference is a BC of 0.640 for the 7mm versus
0.410 of the 300. For long range shooting, bullet shape is very important.
The same differences in shape that allow the VLD to outperform the competition for
retained velocity, also has an effect on terminal ballistics. Conventional bullets are designed
to function at conventional distances—less than 500 yards. In the past, that was all a
hunter could ask for, but with cutting edge compensation technology, new designs are
necessary. First, conventional bullet shapes do not have high enough BC's for long range
performance, unless we drive them with ultra big cartridges. Then the high recoil or
muzzle blast is detrimental to accuracy.
Secondly, the current fad of weight retention

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from steve182 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'd say a good 160 gr. is your best bet. Take your pick...whatever shoots well in your gun.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

For years I used 160 Partitions with good effect although an occassional followup shot was necessary to expedite the finalization of the matter. More recently I have switched to Berger 168 gr VLD bullets for several 7 mm rifles. They are very accurate and offer excellent one shot stop performance at long ranges. I cannot speak of their effect concerning close shots as the situatioon has not presented itself. In the 500 + yard range the elk or deer has always just taken the bullet in the boiler and usually sits down and rolls over. So far every bullet has passed completely through the animal so I don't have any recovered bullets to show you. Exit wounds are not considerably larger than entry so that tells us something. Sometimes the Partitions could be located in the hide on the offside of entry. In reality I would be happy with almost any of the preminum projectiles and probably most of the so called standard bullets on deer or elk from a 7 mm. Even better is a .338 of any type.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

For the 7mm Rem Mag, I would go with the 150 or 160 grain Nosler Partition. I’ve found 175’s are too heavy and don’t have the punch and the range as the 160.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom donohue wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

i shoot a MK1 ruger with 24 inch barrel 7mm rem mag. it just loves the new Federal Fusion in 175 gr. best of all its a great deal $ wise.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm just a bit reluctant on the ballistic tips in the 7 mag. We got to talk to Bob Faulkrod a few years back and he said he used them in a .300 Win Mag on large game with good results, he thought maybe Nosler had toughened up the jacket a bit. I've used them with good results in a 10" T/C .30 Herret but then that's a lot slower too. Back to the 7, I'm not really sure what I'll go to, if anything, at this point. So long as I do my part, the mag-tips do theirs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

007

I handload 160 gr Speer Mag Tips for my son's 7 mm Rem Mag for practice in place of the pricey Federal TBBC. I picked that bullet due to it's similar shape and B.C. to the TBBC. The load I have shoots to the same POI as the Federal load (+/- an inch).

Year before last, he got the Mag Tips and factory TBBC mixed up and took a fine 6x6 bull and a big bodied mule deer with the Mag Tips. We were so pleased with the performance of the TBBC on those two animals that we were shocked when I discovered the mix-up! Mag-Tips might be a good non-Krugerrand bulet!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My old Interarms shoots them well and according to John Wooters years ago, 160 grains is the optimal weight for the 7 mag, so I will probably stay with the mag tips.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigBboy25 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I'd suggest a 160 grain Nosler Partition or accubond, ,but I have had unbelievable results with the 168 grain Berger VLD in my 7mm Mag. The only problem with them is they are a little harder to work a load up for, But once you find one, man do they shoot!!! Steer clear of Sierra GameKings

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WBM wrote 2 years 32 weeks ago

A good .30-06 180 grain load is better than a 7mm Rem Mag 175 gr.

Why does this mythology persist.

Let's take a 180g Sierra BTSP with a BC=.505 and push it at 2800fps...Hodgdon's max out of a 24" barrel. At 1000 yards the bullet is at 1312fps with 688ftlbs of energy and drops -300"

Next take a 175g Sierra BTSP with a BC=550 and push it at 2800fps...again Hodgdon's max out of a 24" barrel. At 1000 yards the bullet is at 1428fps
with 781ftlbs of energy and drops -278"

How is the 30-06 better?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm with Clay. If you or your rifle don't like Partitions, try 160 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw or Barnes Triple Shocks. A 175 grain bullet is too heavy to get good velocity. A good .30-06 180 grain load is better than a 7mm Rem Mag 175 gr.

I have heard mixed reviews on Fusion loads. My son's rifle does not shoot them very well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My son and I have been shooting 160 grain Speer Mag-Tips in our 7 mags for whitetails and were told by a neighbor with elk experience that they would be much better for elk, that we would be better suited with something along the line of a 150 grain ballistic tip.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I agree WAmtnhuntr, have heard of many who were not impressed with the Fusion line. Haven't tried them personally.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I should add don't use fragile bullets like Nosler Ballistic Tips and others in that grouping since they tend to come apart well in advance of when adequate penetration is required.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from CableGuy81 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I shot my first Antelope at 400yds with Winchester Supreme 7MM Mag 160 Grain Accubond, I know you said you try to steer clear of rounds like this, but i have never had a issue. I split a bowling ball in half with 2 shots from 100yrds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ltorote wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I do not know about elk, but stay away from the Winchester silver ballastic tip at short ranges (within 100 yards.) These bullets come apart too much at that high speed and completely ruined the entry shoulder, and most of the opposite side shoulder (I have changed from rib shots to high shoulder shots for longer ranges, and it is just habit to aim high shoulder even when closer.) Though they are accurate out of my Bar 7mm rem mag, usually under 1" MOA at the range, they just tear up too much meat unless shooting over 150 yds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pecos Flats wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I have been known to use a Mag-Tip or Grand Slam in 7mm Rem mag for Elk with equally good results. Both mu favorite 7mm projectile designs at a really reasonable price.
I am not sure how some deduce that you give up that much velocity with the 175 grain pill compared to the 160 grain.
By "carefully" working up a load, it is quite easy to get 2900 fps out of the fore mentioned 175 grainer. In my experience, that is only about 100 fps slower than respective 160 grain bullets. Again, Mag-Tip and Grand Slam.
The 175 grainer seems to offer deeper penetration when taking a less than perfect angling shot.
The 160 grain offers a little more in the way of trajectory, but you will not really notice it unless you are shooting at longer ranges past 400 or 450 yards.
All things are relative when it comes to physics.
Of course, their are a myriad of quality bullets out there in the weight that works best for your purposes!
Bottom line is you really can not go wrong with either weight for the bigger critters.
However, my two-cents is this . . . keep your 7mm for a nice back up rifle and get yourself a good .338 Win Mag and stoke it with 225 grain pills for Elk and such!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

Agreed with ishawooa and + 1 for you sir!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Terry Fett wrote 37 weeks 1 hour ago

30.06 180 versus 175 grain 7 rem Mag. The 7 is much faster down range than anything comparable in the 06. I shoot 160 Accubonds at 3112 fps with an ES of 5 fps. Deadly accurate. Sighted N to S. The 06 has an impressive record but given equal time in the field allows the 7 to run away with more kills. Use 168 VLD's or 180 VLDs and the 7 outruns the 30-378, 338 and 300 at extreme distances. See Gunwerks for more info/truth. The 7 is one of the deadliest and accurate bullets there is especially when pushed out a 26, 28 or 30 inch barrel using Extreme powders like Retumbo. My preference is a finely tuned original Sendero.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Terry Fett wrote 37 weeks 1 hour ago

From Gunwerks: For North American big game the 7mm diameter bullets have much higher BC's than the
30's or the 338's (for reasonable hunting weight bullets). The cartridge I described earlier
launches the 7mm 168 grain Berger VLD at only 3050 fps, and yet it still has more retained
velocity at 1000 yards than the 300 RUM with a 165 grain bullet starting at 3360! This
kind of velocity can be achieved safely in the 7mm Remington Magnum case with
Hodgdon's Retumbo powder—that's right a 7mm Remington Magnum outperforms the 300
Remington Ultra Mag at 1000 yards! The difference is a BC of 0.640 for the 7mm versus
0.410 of the 300. For long range shooting, bullet shape is very important.
The same differences in shape that allow the VLD to outperform the competition for
retained velocity, also has an effect on terminal ballistics. Conventional bullets are designed
to function at conventional distances—less than 500 yards. In the past, that was all a
hunter could ask for, but with cutting edge compensation technology, new designs are
necessary. First, conventional bullet shapes do not have high enough BC's for long range
performance, unless we drive them with ultra big cartridges. Then the high recoil or
muzzle blast is detrimental to accuracy.
Secondly, the current fad of weight retention

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

bmxbiz-fs