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Q:
so when shooting doe's with fawns in the early season what happens to the fawn do they depend on the doe still or do they become self dependent and able to elude predation?

Question by fliphuntr14. Uploaded on October 13, 2009

Answers (17)

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I pass on these shots and pick out the old does

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from deerslayer1234 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Honestly they probally get killed by predators or something, but I like to think its like bambi. the mother dies, but he still is able to grow up into a healthy deer, with the help of its father.

Now I want to watch the movie thanks.

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from vork23 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

If there are other does in the area i have heard that the other does will take them in.

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would pass on the doe with fawns. In my experience the fawns will become easy prey for virtually any type of predator including man. I will tell you this from experience as well, if you do kill a doe that has a young buck fawn, that young buck will not leave the area for a considerable amount of time. Right now I have a young buck that is as close to being tame as you can get that hangs around my work shop. His mother was hit by a tractor/trailer this spring and he has adopted the area where she was killed. He will not survive the opening day of gun season which is Nov. 1. I've tried to scare him away but he simply doesn't want to go. The larger the crowd of people the more interest he seems to show.

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from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

by this time they are pretty much weened from momma and yes they can normally make it with out her . but it is best to take an older dry doe that is not doing any thing other than eating and taking up space . in a hard winter a doe will drive her own fawn from a food source so she get's her fill first , nature ain't all cute and quaint as you know , and momma ain't going to starve to feed the baby

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Cooner has the best answer, I would always wait for a doe that is alone. I like venison but wont shoot a mother doe traveling with a fawn. In Germany if your caught you lose your license , and it is a lifetime license which you will NEVER get back!

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from Kentucky Hunter wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

i will let them pass everytime but if a fawn comes in alone at about 20 yards with my bow it meat in the frezer

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Well...it depends. In areas where there are harsh winters and deer depend on wintering yards to survive, the mother usually brings her fawns to the wintering yard for their first winter. There are records of deer in the Adirondacks traveling over 20 miles to find these wintering grounds (From the ecological center in Newcomb, NY all the way to Schroon Lake, NY). If the doe is killed, the chances of the fawns finding proper wintering habitat are greatly reduced and they will probably not survive. In areas with mild winters, the fawns will probably survive the winter if they make it through the hunting season.

As far as libertyfirst's comment about the young buck, young bucks (1-1.5 year olds) have 2 dispersal periods. The first one is in the spring when does kick their fawns out of the area before they give birth (sounds like the buck missed that dispersal period). The second dispersal period is in the fall when dominant bucks kick younger bucks out of the area. He may still disperse, but if he is as accostumed to people as libertyfirst says he is...he probably will not survive the deer season.

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from robf81 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would have to agree with everyone else to pass on this shot. A very rare adoption can occur, but more than likely this fawn will die to either a predator or inclimate whether have not been taught all of lifes secrets. AS to a button buck being shot during its firstyear of life these hunters need to aquire mor education on determining if its a buck or doe.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I shot a mature doe with my bow over a week ago. Her two large fawns are still in the area and seem to be doing well. They got gone in a hurry when the arrow hit the doe. If I get the chance they will go into my freezer too. Those are the best eating and we have too many deer where I am hunting. The deer need to be thinned out. That is why we can get up to 5 tags in KS. Only one antlered buck though.

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from shane wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I'm with Del. The "fawns" are practically adult deer by now. Some doe "fawns" will even breed.

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from huntnow wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

the mature doe will produce two fawns if she breeds during that year. the yearling might produce one, maybe. though the fawns are not dependent on the mother for milk, they have a lot to learn about avoiding predators and will be much easier prey in her absence. in a way, this is a conservation issue. if you really want to kill a dear for meat, the young ones are very tender.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MB915 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

As bad as this sounds, if I am hunting in an area with a high deer population, and I am trying to decrease the population. I will shoot a doe with her "fawns" for two reasons. 1) Typically the "fawns" will only know that area, so if they do not join another group of deer, they will continue to use the same area where I shot their mother, making them easy targets to harvest in later in the season. Young deer are so delicious. 2) The reason button bucks are kicked out of their original home range is their mother kicks them out when she is about to drop her next batch of fawns. Without mother around it ups the odds that the button buck will stick around and make that area his home range. No guarantee on that though

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from shooter0914 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Here in Wyoming I will pass on a doe with fawns...however most of permits here are for antlered deer only. I pass on them for the reason that they will probably not survive if you killed the doe due to predators. We are not the only ones that think fawns are tasty. Grizzley and wolves do too. The fawn learn alot in that last part of their time with the doe as far as dealing with predators. In places where deer are out of control it is a whole different story. Del was saying that they give 5 tags in kansas, there is definately a reason for that.

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from WTXWildlifer wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Yearling fawns, are capable of surviving on their own during their first fall. They have had survival 101 training 24/7 for several months beforehand. Also consider that this plays a part in the cycle of life, mom must soon prepare for a new fawn. The yearling will either join her mothers group or move into a new home range.

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would pass on that. I'll shoot for meat, but I'm not enthused about killing anything. The thought of being indirectly responsible for a useless death would eat at me even more.

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from anusbuster wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

they just taste better, i shoot them all.

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would pass on the doe with fawns. In my experience the fawns will become easy prey for virtually any type of predator including man. I will tell you this from experience as well, if you do kill a doe that has a young buck fawn, that young buck will not leave the area for a considerable amount of time. Right now I have a young buck that is as close to being tame as you can get that hangs around my work shop. His mother was hit by a tractor/trailer this spring and he has adopted the area where she was killed. He will not survive the opening day of gun season which is Nov. 1. I've tried to scare him away but he simply doesn't want to go. The larger the crowd of people the more interest he seems to show.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

by this time they are pretty much weened from momma and yes they can normally make it with out her . but it is best to take an older dry doe that is not doing any thing other than eating and taking up space . in a hard winter a doe will drive her own fawn from a food source so she get's her fill first , nature ain't all cute and quaint as you know , and momma ain't going to starve to feed the baby

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Well...it depends. In areas where there are harsh winters and deer depend on wintering yards to survive, the mother usually brings her fawns to the wintering yard for their first winter. There are records of deer in the Adirondacks traveling over 20 miles to find these wintering grounds (From the ecological center in Newcomb, NY all the way to Schroon Lake, NY). If the doe is killed, the chances of the fawns finding proper wintering habitat are greatly reduced and they will probably not survive. In areas with mild winters, the fawns will probably survive the winter if they make it through the hunting season.

As far as libertyfirst's comment about the young buck, young bucks (1-1.5 year olds) have 2 dispersal periods. The first one is in the spring when does kick their fawns out of the area before they give birth (sounds like the buck missed that dispersal period). The second dispersal period is in the fall when dominant bucks kick younger bucks out of the area. He may still disperse, but if he is as accostumed to people as libertyfirst says he is...he probably will not survive the deer season.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I pass on these shots and pick out the old does

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from vork23 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

If there are other does in the area i have heard that the other does will take them in.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I shot a mature doe with my bow over a week ago. Her two large fawns are still in the area and seem to be doing well. They got gone in a hurry when the arrow hit the doe. If I get the chance they will go into my freezer too. Those are the best eating and we have too many deer where I am hunting. The deer need to be thinned out. That is why we can get up to 5 tags in KS. Only one antlered buck though.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerslayer1234 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Honestly they probally get killed by predators or something, but I like to think its like bambi. the mother dies, but he still is able to grow up into a healthy deer, with the help of its father.

Now I want to watch the movie thanks.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Cooner has the best answer, I would always wait for a doe that is alone. I like venison but wont shoot a mother doe traveling with a fawn. In Germany if your caught you lose your license , and it is a lifetime license which you will NEVER get back!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kentucky Hunter wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

i will let them pass everytime but if a fawn comes in alone at about 20 yards with my bow it meat in the frezer

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from robf81 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would have to agree with everyone else to pass on this shot. A very rare adoption can occur, but more than likely this fawn will die to either a predator or inclimate whether have not been taught all of lifes secrets. AS to a button buck being shot during its firstyear of life these hunters need to aquire mor education on determining if its a buck or doe.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I'm with Del. The "fawns" are practically adult deer by now. Some doe "fawns" will even breed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntnow wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

the mature doe will produce two fawns if she breeds during that year. the yearling might produce one, maybe. though the fawns are not dependent on the mother for milk, they have a lot to learn about avoiding predators and will be much easier prey in her absence. in a way, this is a conservation issue. if you really want to kill a dear for meat, the young ones are very tender.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MB915 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

As bad as this sounds, if I am hunting in an area with a high deer population, and I am trying to decrease the population. I will shoot a doe with her "fawns" for two reasons. 1) Typically the "fawns" will only know that area, so if they do not join another group of deer, they will continue to use the same area where I shot their mother, making them easy targets to harvest in later in the season. Young deer are so delicious. 2) The reason button bucks are kicked out of their original home range is their mother kicks them out when she is about to drop her next batch of fawns. Without mother around it ups the odds that the button buck will stick around and make that area his home range. No guarantee on that though

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shooter0914 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Here in Wyoming I will pass on a doe with fawns...however most of permits here are for antlered deer only. I pass on them for the reason that they will probably not survive if you killed the doe due to predators. We are not the only ones that think fawns are tasty. Grizzley and wolves do too. The fawn learn alot in that last part of their time with the doe as far as dealing with predators. In places where deer are out of control it is a whole different story. Del was saying that they give 5 tags in kansas, there is definately a reason for that.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WTXWildlifer wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Yearling fawns, are capable of surviving on their own during their first fall. They have had survival 101 training 24/7 for several months beforehand. Also consider that this plays a part in the cycle of life, mom must soon prepare for a new fawn. The yearling will either join her mothers group or move into a new home range.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

I would pass on that. I'll shoot for meat, but I'm not enthused about killing anything. The thought of being indirectly responsible for a useless death would eat at me even more.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from anusbuster wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

they just taste better, i shoot them all.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

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