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Q:
What is a CRP field?

Question by mdhager115. Uploaded on February 05, 2009

Answers (14)

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from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

CRP fields are large tracts of farm land that the government pays the farmer to leave fallow and grow into thick undergrowth. It is supposed to help species of animals with cover and food and also helps cut down on erosion. CRP stands for conservative reserve program, just a little fyi.

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from TheEasternShore... wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

pieces of land that you cant yield a crop from just let it grow like it would in the wild. I think

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from Del in KS wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

The Conservation Reserve Program pays farmers to set aside fields for wildlife in return for a few dollars an acre. Most Kansas CRP is covered with prairie grasses. Since it pays little they usually set aside fields that have poor soil. Sometimes when the weather is very dry farmers are allowed to cut hay on some of it. A high percentage of the states Walk in hunting program land is also CRP.

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from Chris Carpenter wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

yep it also has to be planted in a native grass

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Ok so I used to work for the government agency (NRCS) that is in charge of the technical aspects of CRP. Del is the closest. New CRP is planted in native grasses such as big bluestem, little bluestem, switchgrass, indian grass, and western wheatgrass, along with native forbs such as illinois bundleflower, black sampson, wild sunflower, etc. Farmers are paid to plant poor unproductive farm ground that qualifies into this mixture for a period of 10-15 years. Old CRP didn't include the forbs. Wildlife such as pheasant thrive in these areas. Areas that have good soil do not qualify most of the ground is considered highley erodible. In times of drought the land is opened up for emergency haying and grazing however this can only be done after nesting season and must be completed in time to allow regrowth for the next year.

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from Beekeeper wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Good job Herb! I wish we could get more native grass land habitat in CRP program in the Southeast. All we get is Pine trees! Even the Long Leaf is planted in dense stands like Loblolly. But the Pine CRP down here is good for small and uplad game for 4-5 years.

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from Rory wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

government land bascially

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from Rory wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

government land bascially

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from beagleboy wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

CRP ground is not always government ground, although public lands usually add CRP fields to improve habitat. CRP= Conservation Restoration Program. If you own ground, the gov't will gives you funds for planting native grasses to benefit wildlife and restore native species.

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

beagle boy you should read my post above, CRP is the Conservation Reserve Program, I worked making plans and contracts for the government agency who regulates it. It is always governement ground that doesn't mean they control access to it they make payments to the land owners.

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from kvlazer22 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Tracts of native grass/thick brush.

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from kjflorian wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

See answers above. I am a board member of Pheasants Forever and we utilize that all the time. It's a good program, there are requirements before you can enroll it in the program. I know in MI it has to be farmed for at least 3 years in a row crop to qualify. Then you are paid x amount of dollars per acre for the 10-15 yr program. You can also combine it by planting trees and shrubs etc... Great cover and source of food for all animals.

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from 60256 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

In ND there is what is called "highly erodible land" and this land is taken out of farming and put into the conservation program "CRP". Great for hunting.

Nate

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from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

Agreed with herbie57_57 answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Ok so I used to work for the government agency (NRCS) that is in charge of the technical aspects of CRP. Del is the closest. New CRP is planted in native grasses such as big bluestem, little bluestem, switchgrass, indian grass, and western wheatgrass, along with native forbs such as illinois bundleflower, black sampson, wild sunflower, etc. Farmers are paid to plant poor unproductive farm ground that qualifies into this mixture for a period of 10-15 years. Old CRP didn't include the forbs. Wildlife such as pheasant thrive in these areas. Areas that have good soil do not qualify most of the ground is considered highley erodible. In times of drought the land is opened up for emergency haying and grazing however this can only be done after nesting season and must be completed in time to allow regrowth for the next year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

Good job Herb! I wish we could get more native grass land habitat in CRP program in the Southeast. All we get is Pine trees! Even the Long Leaf is planted in dense stands like Loblolly. But the Pine CRP down here is good for small and uplad game for 4-5 years.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from herbie57_57 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

beagle boy you should read my post above, CRP is the Conservation Reserve Program, I worked making plans and contracts for the government agency who regulates it. It is always governement ground that doesn't mean they control access to it they make payments to the land owners.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kvlazer22 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Tracts of native grass/thick brush.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kjflorian wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

See answers above. I am a board member of Pheasants Forever and we utilize that all the time. It's a good program, there are requirements before you can enroll it in the program. I know in MI it has to be farmed for at least 3 years in a row crop to qualify. Then you are paid x amount of dollars per acre for the 10-15 yr program. You can also combine it by planting trees and shrubs etc... Great cover and source of food for all animals.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

CRP fields are large tracts of farm land that the government pays the farmer to leave fallow and grow into thick undergrowth. It is supposed to help species of animals with cover and food and also helps cut down on erosion. CRP stands for conservative reserve program, just a little fyi.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

The Conservation Reserve Program pays farmers to set aside fields for wildlife in return for a few dollars an acre. Most Kansas CRP is covered with prairie grasses. Since it pays little they usually set aside fields that have poor soil. Sometimes when the weather is very dry farmers are allowed to cut hay on some of it. A high percentage of the states Walk in hunting program land is also CRP.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris Carpenter wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

yep it also has to be planted in a native grass

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from beagleboy wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

CRP ground is not always government ground, although public lands usually add CRP fields to improve habitat. CRP= Conservation Restoration Program. If you own ground, the gov't will gives you funds for planting native grasses to benefit wildlife and restore native species.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 60256 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

In ND there is what is called "highly erodible land" and this land is taken out of farming and put into the conservation program "CRP". Great for hunting.

Nate

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 2 weeks ago

Agreed with herbie57_57 answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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from TheEasternShore... wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

pieces of land that you cant yield a crop from just let it grow like it would in the wild. I think

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rory wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

government land bascially

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from Rory wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

government land bascially

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