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How To Replace A Rifle Stock

Revive that old rifle with a synthetic stock to make it more accurate and weigh less

In the current economic climate, it could be a while before that new rifle you've had your eyes on ever reaches your hands. But what if I told you that in one hour you could make your old rifle shed a pound or more and increase its accuracy for a fraction of the cost of a new gun? · All you need to do is glass-bed the barreled action into a synthetic replacement stock. Sounds like a job for a gunsmith? I thought so too, but Wayne York of Oregunsmithing (541-278-4177)—who provided one of his composite stocks for the project rifle, a Remington 700 .350 Magnum—assured me that anyone who could follow directions could do the job.

 

Parts List:
Sandpaper
Modeling clay
Painter's or electrical tape
Replacement stock ($70-$450)
Bedding kit like the Brownells Acraglas Gel ($40; brownells.com)

PREPARING THE ACTION

1. Separate action from stock: Unscrew the barreled action from the old stock and remove it, along with the trigger guard-floor plate assembly. Remove the bolt.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

2. Remove Trigger Assembly: Tap out the pins holding the trigger assembly and remove. Also detach the scope (bases and rings can stay in place).assembly_3 [nid:1001345043]

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

3. Tape Up The Barrel: Put a strip of wide tape lengthwise along the underside of the barrel, starting just forward of the recoil lug. Cut strips of tape to precisely fit the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug, but leave the back of the lug bare. Tape other exposed metal, including the underside of the tang. If you are bedding the trigger guard-floor plate assembly, tape that metalwork. (When you purchase a stock from Oregunsmithing, York will bed this area at no cost if you send the barreled action; this is an important service if any metalwork has been customized, such as the Blackburn trigger guard-floor plate on my .350.) Place two more lengthwise strips of tape along the bottom of the barrel, starting about 1 1/2 inches forward of the recoil lug. The three layers of tape in this area provide the gap to free-float the barrel.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

4. Insert Clay in Action Crevices: Work modeling clay into any nooks in the barreled action, especially the crevices exposed once the trigger assembly is removed. Scrape and smooth the clay to a precise fit to keep bedding compound from seeping inside and locking the action to the stock.

PREPARING THE STOCK

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

5. Roughen Channel: With 100-grit dry sandpaper, rough up the inside of the replacement stock, including the barrel channel, the rear tang indent, and the inlet for the front receiver ring. If you are bedding the trigger guard-floor plate, rough up the indents.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

6. Tape Up The Fore-End: Stick strips of tape to the sides of the fore-end where they contact the barrel, around the rear tang, and anywhere that bedding compound could squeeze out and contact the outside of the stock. Clamp the stock in the vise with the barrel channel facing up.

GLASS-BEDDING THE ACTION

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

7. Apply Release Agent: Apply the release agent supplied in the bedding kit to all metal parts that can come in contact with the bedding compound. Don't forget to coat the action and guard screws.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

8. Apply Bedding Epoxy: Mix the bedding epoxy. Apply a thin layer to the indent under the rear tang, in the trigger guard-floor plate indentations (if you are bedding these areas), and to the inlet for the front receiver ring. Fill the recess for the recoil lug half full and apply a line of compound along the barrel channel.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

9. Insert The Action: Set the barreled action into the stock and screw it into place with the action and guard screws. Don't overtighten. Remove excess bedding epoxy with an alcohol-dampened cloth.

Photo by Dan Marsiglio

10. Clamp Rifle In Vise: Lightly clamp the rifle in the vise in a horizontal position. Wait 10 hours for the compound to dry, then follow the kit directions to lift the barreled action from the stock. This might require a light tap on the barrel's underside with a rubber hammer.

 

Comments (12)

Top Rated
All Comments
from bjohnston wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Very informative, but are there ways to do somthing similar to a remington 7600?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sksclarky wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

I liked your article on the glass bedding of a rifle stock, however over the years of listening to my father and uncle and story after story on old-timer accuracy you fail to mention why this made your .350 more accurate. Aren't .30 cal. and larger supposed to "float"(the piece of writing paper drawn between the barrel and stock from forearm to breech) on the stock? And why does this bedding make for a more accurate rifle? Then you take your unacclimated gun from beside the fire at camp out to 20 F will this not change the stock and thence the barrel orientation proving to misalign your shot. I guess all the reading one does gets in their heads and certainly confuses oneself. I guess what i'm getting at is dad scoffed at my last two rifle purchases in SS synthetic beauty. Savage arms 112 in .300 RUM and 116 in .270 WIN. Both shot amazing out of the box with minimal powder adjustments (although the RUM is alittle more than expensive to shoot) but both arms float in the synthetic stocks by a large margin. When you grasp either gun for a steady lineup on a buck or bear you can almost feel the movement in that forearm and both guns have never let me down always hitting their mark at various distances and angles. Even a stray late winter coyote last year in the front yard was no match for the .270. My question is should I leave the arms alone or choose your "End Result"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Z-Mohar wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Wow, this is very helpful, if I ever need to replace a stock I will go here first.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoyt187 wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

That was a great informative article and i will be following your instructions as soon as i find a synthetic stock for my mausen-nugant. I know its an inexpensive rifle and can get them for 80 bucks at a gun show but it was my first and will always be my favorite.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoyt187 wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

That was a great informative article and i will be following your instructions as soon as i find a synthetic stock for my mausen-nugant. I know its an inexpensive rifle and can get them for 80 bucks at a gun show but it was my first and will always be my favorite.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mexhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I got about 6 rifles, all are getting this treatment.
any ideas for something to do with the wooden stock?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ChandlerV1997 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

That's pretty cool. And mexhunter, you could just sell the stocks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bellringer wrote 2 years 43 weeks ago

You could always build a fire.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

If your wood stocks are still in good shape you could just bed them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 153 wrote 2 years 29 weeks ago

would this same process work with a leveraction with a wooden stock?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MHoffpauir wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

This is great info. I've been planning a stock replacement on one of my Remington 700's for a while now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from UpStateMike wrote 2 years 8 hours ago

keep the old stocks. They might be worth something to someone. I would always keep the stock if it's military. They ain't making them anymore.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from bjohnston wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Very informative, but are there ways to do somthing similar to a remington 7600?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sksclarky wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

I liked your article on the glass bedding of a rifle stock, however over the years of listening to my father and uncle and story after story on old-timer accuracy you fail to mention why this made your .350 more accurate. Aren't .30 cal. and larger supposed to "float"(the piece of writing paper drawn between the barrel and stock from forearm to breech) on the stock? And why does this bedding make for a more accurate rifle? Then you take your unacclimated gun from beside the fire at camp out to 20 F will this not change the stock and thence the barrel orientation proving to misalign your shot. I guess all the reading one does gets in their heads and certainly confuses oneself. I guess what i'm getting at is dad scoffed at my last two rifle purchases in SS synthetic beauty. Savage arms 112 in .300 RUM and 116 in .270 WIN. Both shot amazing out of the box with minimal powder adjustments (although the RUM is alittle more than expensive to shoot) but both arms float in the synthetic stocks by a large margin. When you grasp either gun for a steady lineup on a buck or bear you can almost feel the movement in that forearm and both guns have never let me down always hitting their mark at various distances and angles. Even a stray late winter coyote last year in the front yard was no match for the .270. My question is should I leave the arms alone or choose your "End Result"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Z-Mohar wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Wow, this is very helpful, if I ever need to replace a stock I will go here first.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoyt187 wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

That was a great informative article and i will be following your instructions as soon as i find a synthetic stock for my mausen-nugant. I know its an inexpensive rifle and can get them for 80 bucks at a gun show but it was my first and will always be my favorite.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ChandlerV1997 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

That's pretty cool. And mexhunter, you could just sell the stocks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

If your wood stocks are still in good shape you could just bed them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoyt187 wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

That was a great informative article and i will be following your instructions as soon as i find a synthetic stock for my mausen-nugant. I know its an inexpensive rifle and can get them for 80 bucks at a gun show but it was my first and will always be my favorite.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mexhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I got about 6 rifles, all are getting this treatment.
any ideas for something to do with the wooden stock?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bellringer wrote 2 years 43 weeks ago

You could always build a fire.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 153 wrote 2 years 29 weeks ago

would this same process work with a leveraction with a wooden stock?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MHoffpauir wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

This is great info. I've been planning a stock replacement on one of my Remington 700's for a while now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from UpStateMike wrote 2 years 8 hours ago

keep the old stocks. They might be worth something to someone. I would always keep the stock if it's military. They ain't making them anymore.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment