Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Wild Duck Recipe: How to Cook Salmi


Photo by Travis Rathbone

A salmi is an oldfangled, richly flavored game stew—often served, like chipped beef, over toast—that was a delicacy popular in the 1890s. This modern version is a luscious, soul-satisfying use for whole ducks.
Salmi of Wild Duck Recipe

Ingredients
- 2 large ducks (mallard, pintail, gadwall) or 4 small ones (shoveler, wigeon, teal)
- 2 Tbsp. butter, softened
- 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
- 3 onions, chopped
- 1 large carrot, chopped
- 2 stalks celery, chopped
- 2 garlic cloves, chopped
- 1 Tbsp. dried thyme
- 2 whole cloves
- 2 cups chicken stock or broth
- 1 cup dry red wine
- 3 Tbsp. butter
- 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
- 4 oz. white mushrooms, sliced
- 1/3 cup cognac, sherry, or Madeira
- 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
- Buttered, toasted slices of baguette or other crusty bread, for serving
- Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Dry the ducks, inside and out, and salt and pepper generously. Spread tine softened butter over each bird and place ducks, breast side down, in a shallow roasting pan. Roast until the meat is barely rare; it will finish cooking later. The cooking time will depend on size, but start checking as early as 8 or 10 minutes in. Go ahead and cut into the meat to check, as you'll be hashing it all up soon anyway. Remove from the oven and let cool. When cool enough to handle, chop the meat into medium-size pieces, reserving the bones, skin, and trimmings.

2. Heat the oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion, carrot, and celery for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme, and cloves, along with more salt and pepper, and cook for another minute. Add the trimmings, bones, and skin, and cook for an additional minute, stirring. Pour in the stock and wine and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, and simmer, uncovered, for about 2 hours, or until the mixture is reduced to about 2 cups. Occasionally skim fat from the surface. Strain the sauce, discarding the vegetables and trimmings, and return the sauce to a gentle simmer.

3. Melt 2 Tbsp. of butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, then add the flour. Stir or whisk constantly until the mixture is thick and slightly beige, about 6 minutes. Ladle some of the sauce into the pan and whisk to combine, then add a little more sauce. Add this flour-sauce mixture to the sauce, whisking until well incorporated. It should resemble a thin gravy. Simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

4. Wipe out the small saucepan, and over medium-high heat, melt the remaining 1 Tbsp. of butter. When it bubbles, stir in the mushrooms, until wilted and brown. Add the cognac, and bring to a quick boil. (Be careful. If you tilt the pan, it may erupt in flames. That's O.K., and actually quite preferable. Just don't singe your eyebrows.) Put the mushrooms in the sauce, along with the reserved meat. Let the mixture simmer until the duck is just heated through; the heat of the liquid will bring it to medium-rare. Stir in the parsley. Serve with the toasted bread, either on top, like chipped beef, or with the bread on the side for scooping and dipping. Serves 4 to 6.

Comments (11)

Top Rated
All Comments
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

My-T-Fine Eatin'!

A minor variation of Pouledeaux (Coot) stew, and one that I will revive again in the Fall.

Add two Jalapenos or Serranos for authentic Cajun.

Gotta have tomatoes and potatoes as well.

If no waterfowl are available, a young raccoon will do.

Wash it down with Loganberry wine at 31 degrees.

Don't forget the garlic bread.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Very nice!! and tasty!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Now thats a recipe Justin Wilson would drink to.OOOOWEEE
Thanks for the recipe.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Don't forget the Bay Leaves.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Any time i cooked a duck or goose it have my bay leaves,The first time i tried to cook a wild goose it would run you out of the house,I finally talked to enoungh elders to figure out how to cook them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coachcl wrote 3 years 32 weeks ago

This sounds really good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from vezzo wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I still have some duck meat and this is going to be a great recipe to use with it! Defently going to enjoy this soon

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JGooding1 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I'm gonna be trying this tomorrow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Neil J. Selbicky wrote 9 weeks 6 hours ago

Glad to see you bring this recipe around again. This the recipe that got me going on waterfowl hunting and eating. I'm trying lots of other ways to prepare duck for the table, but this recipe remains my all-time favorite.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 8 weeks 6 days ago

That sounds so good!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wittsec wrote 8 weeks 6 days ago

Makes me mouth watering hungry just reading the article.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from JGooding1 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I'm gonna be trying this tomorrow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

My-T-Fine Eatin'!

A minor variation of Pouledeaux (Coot) stew, and one that I will revive again in the Fall.

Add two Jalapenos or Serranos for authentic Cajun.

Gotta have tomatoes and potatoes as well.

If no waterfowl are available, a young raccoon will do.

Wash it down with Loganberry wine at 31 degrees.

Don't forget the garlic bread.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Very nice!! and tasty!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Now thats a recipe Justin Wilson would drink to.OOOOWEEE
Thanks for the recipe.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Don't forget the Bay Leaves.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Any time i cooked a duck or goose it have my bay leaves,The first time i tried to cook a wild goose it would run you out of the house,I finally talked to enoungh elders to figure out how to cook them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coachcl wrote 3 years 32 weeks ago

This sounds really good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from vezzo wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I still have some duck meat and this is going to be a great recipe to use with it! Defently going to enjoy this soon

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Neil J. Selbicky wrote 9 weeks 6 hours ago

Glad to see you bring this recipe around again. This the recipe that got me going on waterfowl hunting and eating. I'm trying lots of other ways to prepare duck for the table, but this recipe remains my all-time favorite.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 8 weeks 6 days ago

That sounds so good!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wittsec wrote 8 weeks 6 days ago

Makes me mouth watering hungry just reading the article.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs