Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Merwin: Avoid Hypothermia With a Mustang Survival Jacket

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Lateral Line
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

October 30, 2009

Merwin: Avoid Hypothermia With a Mustang Survival Jacket

By John Merwin

Staying alive. Personal safety is high on my fall fishing list. The water temperature this morning on one of the big lakes I often fish is 51 degrees. Normally dressed, if I fall out of the boat there’s a good chance of death by hypothermia.

So a couple of years ago, I bought one of the Mustang Survival Jackets shown here. It’s a floatation coat/PFD with enough foam inside to also protect my body’s core temperature in the water. I figure that’ll be enough so I can either make it to shore or somehow struggle back into or on the boat on my own. The jacket is also plenty warm and comfortable while fishing.

This was not some free sample, by the way, but cost somewhere well north of $200. When I explained it to my wife, she who otherwise tends to parsimony immediately bought one too.

I have similar thoughts about river fishing. Neoprene chest waders aren’t as comfortable as the new breathables I most often wear, but unlike breathables the neoprene will act as a wetsuit if I take an inadvertent dive. So there would be some warmth during and after any disaster.

A wading staff and wading boots with serious metal studs, meanwhile, make me a little more secure when slopping around after late-season steelhead.

Have an enjoyable Halloween weekend. And if you’re fishing in this late-season cold, please also do whatever it takes to make sure you get home again.

Comments (7)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Dann wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I used Mustang Survival Jackets in the Navy for many years. In the foulest of weather, that jacket was warm and allowed me the freedom of movement to do my job. The fact that it had a built in flotation device made that jacket my best friend.

If I ever again make my living on the water or spend any amount of time on vessels again, I will spend the money and buy my own. Its money well spent.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I have only heard good things about the Mustang Survival Jackets.

You don't need to fall into the water to get hypothermia. I was on a salmon charter with cold rain, moderate winds, and temps in the high 40's and low 50's. Didn't go out with the right clothes and ended up with hypothermia. Similar conditions the second time, but not on the water.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bjohnston wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

The mustang jacket sounds perfect for stealhead fishing on the Lake Erie tributaries. It's now at the top of my Christmas list.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

People forget that fishing "really is dangerous". It's the sport that accounts for the most deaths. Seriously. Really, it's a perfectly safe activity if you use some common sense and come prepared - things that seem obvious to most. Apparently though, it wasn't very obvious to a statistically significant number of dead people.

I think a lot of that goes back to the "Zombie" post about TV and lack of outdoors exposure. It's that reverence for the power of nature that keeps us enlightened ones alive. If you haven't been exposed to nature from early on, not only are you lacking knowledge, you're lacking that reverence and respect. If Yuppie Jim from Seattle decides to mosey on into the Sol Duc, something bad might happen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Fisher Boy wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

looks nice, sounds nice, but seems only for those who are on large water bodies., but not for those who fish smaller water bodies.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mack-ann wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

J. Merwin: You are right on the problem of too manny tournaments ! Too crowded too dangerous to be on the water. These fast boats have no mercy on parked anglers.
I am now void of a Bass boat/great expense and worry about surviving an outing.
Mack

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lucky Eddy wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

Three years ago I was standing in line at the Toronto Sportsmen Show. I was buying a full Mustang floatation suit for ice fishing and drifting the lower Niagara River in winter. The guy behind me was trying to explain to his wife why he needed to spend five hundred dollars for a suit. And her answer was " You have never needed one before, I don't see why you need it now."

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Dann wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I used Mustang Survival Jackets in the Navy for many years. In the foulest of weather, that jacket was warm and allowed me the freedom of movement to do my job. The fact that it had a built in flotation device made that jacket my best friend.

If I ever again make my living on the water or spend any amount of time on vessels again, I will spend the money and buy my own. Its money well spent.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I have only heard good things about the Mustang Survival Jackets.

You don't need to fall into the water to get hypothermia. I was on a salmon charter with cold rain, moderate winds, and temps in the high 40's and low 50's. Didn't go out with the right clothes and ended up with hypothermia. Similar conditions the second time, but not on the water.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bjohnston wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

The mustang jacket sounds perfect for stealhead fishing on the Lake Erie tributaries. It's now at the top of my Christmas list.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

People forget that fishing "really is dangerous". It's the sport that accounts for the most deaths. Seriously. Really, it's a perfectly safe activity if you use some common sense and come prepared - things that seem obvious to most. Apparently though, it wasn't very obvious to a statistically significant number of dead people.

I think a lot of that goes back to the "Zombie" post about TV and lack of outdoors exposure. It's that reverence for the power of nature that keeps us enlightened ones alive. If you haven't been exposed to nature from early on, not only are you lacking knowledge, you're lacking that reverence and respect. If Yuppie Jim from Seattle decides to mosey on into the Sol Duc, something bad might happen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Fisher Boy wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

looks nice, sounds nice, but seems only for those who are on large water bodies., but not for those who fish smaller water bodies.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mack-ann wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

J. Merwin: You are right on the problem of too manny tournaments ! Too crowded too dangerous to be on the water. These fast boats have no mercy on parked anglers.
I am now void of a Bass boat/great expense and worry about surviving an outing.
Mack

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lucky Eddy wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

Three years ago I was standing in line at the Toronto Sportsmen Show. I was buying a full Mustang floatation suit for ice fishing and drifting the lower Niagara River in winter. The guy behind me was trying to explain to his wife why he needed to spend five hundred dollars for a suit. And her answer was " You have never needed one before, I don't see why you need it now."

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs