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Giant 17ft Python Pregnant With 87 Eggs Caught in Florida Everglades

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August 14, 2012

Giant 17ft Python Pregnant With 87 Eggs Caught in Florida Everglades

By Chad Love

So just how big do you think Florida's pythons can get, and what kind of growth and reproductive potential does southern Florida offer? Apparently the answers to question one is "damn big" and the answer to question two is "plenty." Because if the recent discovery of a monstrous, record-breaking 17-foot long Burmese python laden with a whopping 87 eggs is any indication, "damn big" and "plenty" perfectly sums up Florida's burgeoning serpent problem.

From this story in the Miami Herald:

Researchers examining a record-length Burmese python captured in Everglades National Park have uncovered an equally unsettling record hidden in its carcass. The 17-foot, 7-inch snake, the largest ever caught in the wild in Florida, also was laden with 87 eggs. The discovery, announced Monday by the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, is the latest confirmation that the giant exotic constrictors have rebounded since a brutal freeze two years ago that experts estimated may have killed off more than half of the population at the time.

According to the story, the giant female was first captured on March 6, when a GPS-tagged male python led researchers to her lair. Researchers re-captured the snake and euthanized it before it could lay any of the eggs. The snake was found to be in excellent health, which does not bode well for Florida's native wildlife.

From the story: This thing is monstrous — it’s about a foot wide,” said Kenneth Krysko, manager of the museum’s herpetology collection, in a release. “It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild, there’s nothing stopping them and the native wildlife are in trouble.”

After scientists have finished their necropsy, the snake will be mounted and displayed at the University of Florida's natural science museum. So, how long do you think it'll be before you find giant invasive snakes where you live?

Comments (17)

Top Rated
All Comments
from vayotehowler wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

today i find water snakes garter snakes rattlers and copperheads and more already here in VA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gtbigsky wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Find snakes? We already have plenty of snakes in PA, Chad. I don't think we are in danger of pythons due to the climate here. In fact I am more worried about the migrating Chupacabra. Those little buggers are hard on fawns and turkey

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LostLure wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Another reason not to live in Flordia

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadlove wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Ha! Kinda forgot to put "giant invasive" before "snakes" in that last sentence, didn't I?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dukkillr wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Time to re-watch Ananaconda for hunting strategies...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from elkslayer wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

When does the horror film come out?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

I'm sure glad we allowed these to get loose in the 'glades. Why did they ever allow these things intto the country? These aren't pets!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Too cold in illinois for these things- besides, the governer doesn't want competition.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from habben97 wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I live Illinois and my friend saw a timber rattler on the trail once. he said it was coiled up and rattiling

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

It has been estimated that more than half of the Burmese pythons in The Everglades were killed during a cold snap last winter. Nature tends towards equilibrium.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brendon Reese wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

as soon as they breed with the african rock python its gonna be a super snakke africans are super agressive and every year the burmese get higher and higher and more resistant to the cold so dont say they cant live there

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

As a Floridian, I have one thing to say... yikes!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gtbigsky wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I read a story on F&S about people training there labs to locate snakes . I say they should expedite the process because the invasive constrictors have and will continue to destroy the everglades ecosystem. And yes, this another reason among many to not move to Florida!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Make an omelet

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Here, in S'E' Louisiana, the drought and messed up weather is making the snakes act strange.
as seeing one kind or another that should not be where they are.
really strange.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leon Pereira wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

It's sad that human negligence and stupidity has lead to such problems, these snakes have evolved with big predators like the marsh crocodiles and tigers and are extremely capable of survival, eliminating is the only solution but that is easier said than done, Here in India I do relocate native snakes that come in conflict with humans as unfortounately there is no other option. For these pythons they cannot be relocated (exported to their native areas) as they could introduce alien disease into wild stock.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from temest wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

So is it going to take one of the legislator's kids being killed and eaten by a Rock Python for the State to actually be proactive about a non-indigenous top predator to be more controlled/eradicated? Unfortunately there are too many morons out there that would kill a human if not regulated properly.
The bottom is, however, is if one of these monsters were on my property and I had pets or kids, I would use whatever means possible to kill the animal on the spot. Just imagine your 4 year old son or daughter coming face-to-face with a hungry 14' anaconda or python in your own back yard during the "off-season". What would you do? Pick up the phone and call somebody when you've got a .38 or .44 Mag inside your house.
Florida is just too passive in its fight against animals that are ruining an ecosystem and primed to take human lives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from LostLure wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Another reason not to live in Flordia

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from vayotehowler wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

today i find water snakes garter snakes rattlers and copperheads and more already here in VA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gtbigsky wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Find snakes? We already have plenty of snakes in PA, Chad. I don't think we are in danger of pythons due to the climate here. In fact I am more worried about the migrating Chupacabra. Those little buggers are hard on fawns and turkey

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadlove wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Ha! Kinda forgot to put "giant invasive" before "snakes" in that last sentence, didn't I?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dukkillr wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Time to re-watch Ananaconda for hunting strategies...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from elkslayer wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

When does the horror film come out?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

I'm sure glad we allowed these to get loose in the 'glades. Why did they ever allow these things intto the country? These aren't pets!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Too cold in illinois for these things- besides, the governer doesn't want competition.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from habben97 wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I live Illinois and my friend saw a timber rattler on the trail once. he said it was coiled up and rattiling

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

It has been estimated that more than half of the Burmese pythons in The Everglades were killed during a cold snap last winter. Nature tends towards equilibrium.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brendon Reese wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

as soon as they breed with the african rock python its gonna be a super snakke africans are super agressive and every year the burmese get higher and higher and more resistant to the cold so dont say they cant live there

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

As a Floridian, I have one thing to say... yikes!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gtbigsky wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I read a story on F&S about people training there labs to locate snakes . I say they should expedite the process because the invasive constrictors have and will continue to destroy the everglades ecosystem. And yes, this another reason among many to not move to Florida!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Make an omelet

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Here, in S'E' Louisiana, the drought and messed up weather is making the snakes act strange.
as seeing one kind or another that should not be where they are.
really strange.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leon Pereira wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

It's sad that human negligence and stupidity has lead to such problems, these snakes have evolved with big predators like the marsh crocodiles and tigers and are extremely capable of survival, eliminating is the only solution but that is easier said than done, Here in India I do relocate native snakes that come in conflict with humans as unfortounately there is no other option. For these pythons they cannot be relocated (exported to their native areas) as they could introduce alien disease into wild stock.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from temest wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

So is it going to take one of the legislator's kids being killed and eaten by a Rock Python for the State to actually be proactive about a non-indigenous top predator to be more controlled/eradicated? Unfortunately there are too many morons out there that would kill a human if not regulated properly.
The bottom is, however, is if one of these monsters were on my property and I had pets or kids, I would use whatever means possible to kill the animal on the spot. Just imagine your 4 year old son or daughter coming face-to-face with a hungry 14' anaconda or python in your own back yard during the "off-season". What would you do? Pick up the phone and call somebody when you've got a .38 or .44 Mag inside your house.
Florida is just too passive in its fight against animals that are ruining an ecosystem and primed to take human lives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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