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Utah 'Mountain Man' Captured: Hunters Lead Authorities to Fugitive Hiding in Wilderness for 6 Years

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April 04, 2013

Utah 'Mountain Man' Captured: Hunters Lead Authorities to Fugitive Hiding in Wilderness for 6 Years

By Chad Love

A pair of Utah hunters are being credited for the capture of a notorious fugitive after they encountered the man in the woods.

From this story on abcnews.com:
Utah's elusive mountain man may have inadvertently revealed his identity to two hunters, setting off a massive police operation to snare the man authorities said had roamed a vast mountainous area for six years, allegedly burglarizing and shooting up cabins. After he allegedly fired shots at a police helicopter, pointed his gun at a sheriff and led authorities on a snowshoe chase, 45-year-old Troy James Knapp's run came to an end Tuesday. "He threw his rifle down and told the deputies, 'Good job, you got me," Sevier County Sheriff Nathan Curtis told ABCNews.com. The 50-man operation, involving resources from multiple counties, was put into place after two hunters reported meeting a suspicious man on a narrow trail last Friday. The man did not identify himself, Curtis said, but told them: "I'm a mountain man."

According to the story, the "mountain man" assured the hunters he wasn't going to shoot them. After the encounter, the hunters called a friend to send them a picture of Knapp. When they realized they had just met Knapp, they called police. When Knapp was captured, he allegedly told police "I don't hate people, I just don't like them."

Comments (10)

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I have been told several times not to fish alone or unarmed in the mountains of California. I guess they are crawling with criminals seeking refuge. If it takes 50 men and a helicopter to catch just one, I guess the criminals can consider themselves safe.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Our woods are full of them dangerous fellers in Ideeeho. I've converted my semi's to fully autos, and walk in circles even when I go fishin. Ain't worth fishin our rivers out here if you're and out of stater...no sirree Bob.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MaxPower wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Folks in Utah have been after this guy for a while. He's lived in the back-country year round, but would break into peoples cabins during the winter to eat their food and steal valuables. It was actually a father and son out shed hunting that ran into him.

He isn't the only shady individual in the Utah mountains either. Southern Utah is notorious for stories of hikers/hunters/campers etc. stumbling upon marijuana plots. I'm sure other states have that problem too.

Always carry a sidearm, it's not just for bears or cats.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Mountain man types up here don't last long. The bugs will suck their blood dry or take their sanity. I'm guessing this guy would have been safe on the second count. The shrinks will need a microscope to examine his brain.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bberg7794 wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I remember hearing on the radio about a fugitive living off the land in central New York in the late-90's. They credit a pair of turkey hunters with the find that led to his re-arrest. I have recently tried to find out his name and more on the story, but have not had any luck.

There also was a Bulgarian ex-secret police fugitive living off the land in western Washington in the early 2000's who proved difficult to catch. He was breaking into summer homes and was finally caught by a sheriff's deputy who had staked out his access trail and used night vision to capture him.

Who knows how many there are, but I have always been interested in interviewing some of them. I think it would make a best seller type survival book.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from w2e2b wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Clinchknot, you could be making a big mistake! Do walk in those circles clockwise or counter clockwise?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I go clockwise for awhile, then go counterclockwise. I just have to unwind after awhile.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Yeah, "mountain men" ... breaking into resort cabins. What's so hard about surviving that way? Pffffft! These guys are just bums with guns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 1 week ago

bberg, I remember that story because I was up in New York when that fugitive was in the woods eluding law enforcement. It was north of Lake George.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Hi...

There are several homeless people living in various wooded areas around here. Have been for some time. Most are harmless...and just want to be left alone.

The Census Takers found them though...!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from buckhunter wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I have been told several times not to fish alone or unarmed in the mountains of California. I guess they are crawling with criminals seeking refuge. If it takes 50 men and a helicopter to catch just one, I guess the criminals can consider themselves safe.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MaxPower wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Folks in Utah have been after this guy for a while. He's lived in the back-country year round, but would break into peoples cabins during the winter to eat their food and steal valuables. It was actually a father and son out shed hunting that ran into him.

He isn't the only shady individual in the Utah mountains either. Southern Utah is notorious for stories of hikers/hunters/campers etc. stumbling upon marijuana plots. I'm sure other states have that problem too.

Always carry a sidearm, it's not just for bears or cats.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 1 week ago

bberg, I remember that story because I was up in New York when that fugitive was in the woods eluding law enforcement. It was north of Lake George.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Hi...

There are several homeless people living in various wooded areas around here. Have been for some time. Most are harmless...and just want to be left alone.

The Census Takers found them though...!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Our woods are full of them dangerous fellers in Ideeeho. I've converted my semi's to fully autos, and walk in circles even when I go fishin. Ain't worth fishin our rivers out here if you're and out of stater...no sirree Bob.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Mountain man types up here don't last long. The bugs will suck their blood dry or take their sanity. I'm guessing this guy would have been safe on the second count. The shrinks will need a microscope to examine his brain.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bberg7794 wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I remember hearing on the radio about a fugitive living off the land in central New York in the late-90's. They credit a pair of turkey hunters with the find that led to his re-arrest. I have recently tried to find out his name and more on the story, but have not had any luck.

There also was a Bulgarian ex-secret police fugitive living off the land in western Washington in the early 2000's who proved difficult to catch. He was breaking into summer homes and was finally caught by a sheriff's deputy who had staked out his access trail and used night vision to capture him.

Who knows how many there are, but I have always been interested in interviewing some of them. I think it would make a best seller type survival book.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from w2e2b wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Clinchknot, you could be making a big mistake! Do walk in those circles clockwise or counter clockwise?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 1 week ago

I go clockwise for awhile, then go counterclockwise. I just have to unwind after awhile.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Yeah, "mountain men" ... breaking into resort cabins. What's so hard about surviving that way? Pffffft! These guys are just bums with guns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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