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When Your Dominant Hand and Eye Don't Match, Which Do You Choose?

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May 19, 2011

When Your Dominant Hand and Eye Don't Match, Which Do You Choose?

By Phil Bourjaily

My earlier post about shooters being made or born  started a discussion of eye dominance. Almost everyone has one eye that is stronger than the other, just as they are left-handed or right handed. While many people have their strong eye and strong hand on the same side, not everyone does. The question was raised whether it is better to shoot from your dominant hand or dominant eye side if they are not one and the same.

With new shooters, I strongly believe you should test them for eye dominance and have them shoot from their dominant eye side. Even if someone has been shooting for a few years on the “wrong” side, I think switching is a good idea. Otherwise they will have to shoot with one eye closed.

Now, there are shooters who do very well with one eye closed. The great trapshooter Nora Ross is the best known one-eyed shooter, and her achievements speak for themselves. Check out her one-eyed form at 1:32 of this clip.

Nevertheless, if you can shoot with both eyes open, you should. Shooting one-eyed makes you over-aware of the gun. Two-eyed shooters see the gun as an insubstantial blur; one eyed shooters see the gun in sharp focus. The better you see it, the more likely you are to aim it, and aiming is the worst way to shoot a shotgun. Your eye-to-hand coordination and subconscious mind are much more effective at putting a gun on target than your conscious, aiming mind can ever be.

Some people, like my son John, are center-dominant, which is like being ambidextrous, but instead of two equally strong hands he has two equally strong eyes. For him the answer is blocking out one eye, as seen in the picture. Everyone else should shoot with both eyes open.

Comments (39)

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from Dave_Maccar wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great post, Phil. I had a pistol instructor tell me once that when new shooters, or even experienced shooters, have trouble keeping both eyes open either out of habit or because it just feels right...he'd recommend they smudge a glob of Vaseline on the lens of their shooting glasses over their non-dominant eye, heavy at first. Gradually he'd have them put less and less on, reducing the opacity so the shooter can slowly get used to keeping both eyes open. I never tried it, because I never had this particular problem, but it seemed like sound advice. Just my two cents.-DM

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ckRich wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Go with the dominant eye. I myself am somewhat of a freak of nature... dominant: any gun and I have to use my left eye, but I can use either eye for archery and atually prefer to shoot right-handed. Oh, and I'm a natural southpaw.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My 13 year old son has a dominant left eye and he's right handed. He tried it both ways (right and left handed) and decided to use his right eye/right side.

It works for him.....

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pudgexl29 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

That vaseline idea sounds good. My sister has that problem. I will recomend that thanks

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Good topic.

I've found new shooters that were left eye dominant and shooting right-handed. They generally just started to shoot and didn't have much help or training. Never knew about a dominant eye.

Like many lefties, I grew up having to use right-handed stuff. As a kid, I "inherited" my right-handed cousin's baseball glove, so I grew up throwing right-handed...same with my bow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from abmcp13 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great article Phil, I never had heard of a good way to test eye dominance before, and my father never tested mine when I first started shooting, he wasn't an avid shooter himself. I have one question for you: After watching the video I determined my left eye is dominant, but I've been shooting a right handed gun with just my right eye (left closed) for nine years, would it be benificial for me to learn to reshoot left handed? Thank you.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from krwheeler wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

We switched lots of boys at Scout Camp last year. We kept an eye on who was performing gymnastics trying to get their "good eye" to line up with the scope. Almost all of the kids that we switched to shooting left handed improved their marksmanship.

As for me and my boss on the rifle range, we discovered we were both "cross eye" dominant, but we were too old to change.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PawPaw wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I concur. I'm predominately left-handed, but my Dad tested me for eye dominance when I began shooting and I'm right-eye dominant. He taught me to shoot right-handed and I couldn't be happier.

On the other hand, two of my six grandsons are left-eye dominant. Guess which side I'm teaching them to shoot from? That's correct! Now I'm buying left-hand bolt rifles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluegraytx wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I'm both center-dominant and ambidexterous. When my father gave me a BB gun at the age of nine I had a difficult time choosing a side until we built a duck blind a few years later and hunted shoulder-to-shoulder. It was my father who suggested that it would be best if I took the left side of the blind and fired southpaw while he did the opposite, and we held to that order when pheasant hunting. It wasn't until I went in the Army that I made a choice that became permanent. With the promise of a three-day pass for those shooting expert at the end of four weeks of trainfire, I opted to fire the M-1 from my hunting side. I've been a southpaw, one-eyed shooter ever since ... and still smiling 50 years later over my three days in San Francisco.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Good post, Phil. I was right eye dominant until I had cataract surgery on the left eye and now am left eye dominant. I also have mono-vision due to an early operation at age four for a lazy eye, an event that leaves me with very little depth perception. I've shot both ways with rifle and shotguns for years but remain best from the right side. Is anyone else so afflicted?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My two bits would say to go with the dominant eye. A person can learn to shoot from either side with a little practice to the point it would be natural, chosen side to shoot from in a relatively short time. The barrel needs to be over the dominant eye.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My kid is left eye, right hand. I switched him soon after we started plinking with the BB gun. The affect was immediate, he started hitting things. I'd been to a couple of shooting events and I asked some experienced coaches and they all said the same thing, he should shoot lefty.

I've no doubt it will be a pain, but it seems like it's worth it to hit what your aiming at.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

When I had my right arm in a full cast, I had to hunt dove and quail left handed and after a day or two, I was back to shooting like nothing ever happened.

Improvise!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

i have varying eye dominance. but am i rightie.. had trouble shooting shotguns all my life cos of it but never with a rifle.. so i`m opting for a reddot so i actually can aim it.. sorts out all the problems for me cos ive already tried it and shooting skeet was almost boring after :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I think it is always best to go with the dominant eye. I once lost the sight of my right eye for several months until my vision was restored surgically. During the dark period, I taught myself to shoot left-handed, and in a very short while it felt just as natural as when I was shooting right handed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I wonder if blocking the non dominant eye helps under normal shooting?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Right eye dominate so I shoot right handed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I'm lucky. Right eye, right handed. My left side is useless for the most part. Except for ping-pong...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I discovered my righthanded son was left-eye dominant the first time he tried to shoot a cork gun. When he moved up to a bb gun and was still leaning his head over the stock so he could look down the barrel with his left eye I figured it was time to do something. I tried the old vaseline on the sunglass lens and when he had trouble with that we tried having him shoot lefthanded. Unfortunately, I am the least ambidextrous person in the world and he evidently inherited that from me. I even though briefly about mortgaging the house and having custom crossover stocks built for him, but by that time he had become so adept at shooting with his awkward hold that it didn't seem worth the money. He's 28 now and somehow or another he's a pretty darned good shot with rifle and shotgun, but I'll be damned if I know how.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My oldest daughter is left eye/right hand.
She passed her CLEET certification course with a near record with her handgun, canting her gun slightly to the left and her head at a God awful angle to the right!!!
When she picks up a shotgun, she looks like she's having some sort of "spastic" event! BUT...she's deadly with it!!
How?
I have no idea! But it works for her!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

The "spastic event" doesn't work very well with a flushing bird, or a crossing duck. Your dominant eye lines up with the target, the other eye is off considerably to the side. Doesn't seem like much choice to me..you have to place the dominant eye over the barrel. Shotgun shooters alter the cast off on the stocks to line up with the dominant eye in precisely the right position. Why wouldn't you learn to shoot from that side? Can't get a conversion on your safety? I think I'd make those adjustments before I lined up with the eye that places the target off line.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I think it was my post which started all this. After many years I am, as was said, ambidextrous. Most of the time I can get my right eye to be dominant, but sometimes it gets lazy and I miss. The blocking out of one eye is fine on a skeet or trap shoot, but what about when you're hunting, especially on rough or uneven ground?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

As a shooter I consider myself a rookie though I have been shooting on and off for years. My biggest problem has been my poor eyesight and ability to focus with both eyes open. I just put a patch over the left lense of my shooting glasses and wow, what a difference it makes. I have been carefully paying attention to your tips on here and applying them to the range and have had success. Phil, Thank you for the help.

Picked up a new Citori yesterday and a copy of Michael McIntosh's Shotguns and Shooting. Cannot wait for shooting season to begin. (the range is currently flooded)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ClayS wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My son who just turned 12 is right handed/left eye dominant, however he just started wearing contact lenses with a perscription intended to assist the bad right eye - better for the right and worse for the left in order to bring them more in-line. The doc says that over time the right should improve greatly and bring his vision back to a more normal state. So long winded windup to ask the question - how does a person's eye perscription play into things? Should I switch my son to shooting left hand if his current lenses mitigate that dominance to a great degree, and may actually influence a change of dominance over time? Kind of stumped there...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GJLOCY wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

If a shooter is found to have cross eye dominance then change to that side if possible as early as possible. I only discovered I was left eye dominant at a sporting clays event when a spoter notice where all of my shoots were hitting (or not). His suggestion was (similar to the vaseline idea) was to use "chapstick" on the left lens of my shooting glasses. I saw an immediate improvement! I have also heard of using "scotch" tape across the field of view on the lens. The tape or chapstick method work, but are tougher to adjust to in the field because of the depth perception issue.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I agree that a person should shoot off the shoulder that their dominant eye is above. If it is necessary to switch, this should be done as early as possible to make gun handling more comfortable and allow the ability to shoot both eyes open (as opposed to myself who uses the both eyes closed technique). The main benefit gained shooting both eyes open is depth perception which is lost with one eyed shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Spencer Tomb wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Letting a novice or near novice shooter continue to shoot cross dominantly is a serious mistake. It takes only a few weeks to get past the awkward stage for young shooters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I am right handed so I shot right-handed for many years, even though I am left eye dominant. In light of the sparse selection of left-handed guns in the world, I would definitely recommend that anyone who CAN go right SHOULD go right. Having been turned into an unwilling lefty due to a blinding right eye injury, I know exactly what I am talking about.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

RES1956 Agreed..How hard is it to shoot off the dominant eye side?..or find a gun that is left handed?..I'd go the XTRA mile to find one, and shoot off the dominant eye side. Like asking a person to eat with a fork using their other hand...don't take long for that to become the dominant hand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mexhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great post, no wounder my dad is such a lousy shot

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

mexhunter..Great excuse to have. "Darn, I hit the bird, but it was the 2nd one...the one that didn't exist.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ableskeever wrote 2 years 44 weeks ago

I never thought about it until I started shooting pistols. I had already naturally gone right-handed with rifles and shotguns because of eye dominance and the bad habit of closing one eye already (now with both eyes open... even scanning with a scope). Being of a right-eye, left-handed persuasion, I had trouble with pistols because my left hand naturally went for the pistol. Once I got better mechanics with my grip (thanks to a MagPul video) I started going right-handed with the pistol as well. I guess being left-handed naturally means that I'm that much quicker with my reloads.

Personally, I think that natural lefties have an advantage towards being ambidextrous in this world where many things are geared towards righties.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from quackdr wrote 2 years 40 weeks ago

If you can, it is always best to have the shooter shoot off the dominant eye side. If it proves too difficult for an old timer to switch or if you are "central dominant" (ambidextrious eyes), blocking the non-mounted eye with chap stick, anti fog stick, dot of liquid soap,clear tape etc. on the shooting glasses works best if you cover the smallest spot possible on that lens. With your empty gun mounted, have a buddy look back at you over the barrel and place a tiny piece of wet paper the size of your pupil on the outside of your shooting glasses lens that blocks the view of the non-mounted eye.(about the size of a pencil eraser). You can then accurately replace this paper with a small dot of scotch tape on the inside of that lens. This will preserve your binocular vision (and therefore depth perception) until the last instant before you mount and pull the trigger. No obstruction of your vision until you have mounted the gun, and by then it should be going bang!

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from b1bendt wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

Being left handed it wasn't until about 10 yrs ago that I found I was right eye dominant. I have always shot everything left handed and got used to having empties fly back at me. I started trying to shoot right handed first pistol then rifle. Hard as heck to get used to after shooting left handed for 40 yrs but I kept trying. I felt I was more accurate with the rifle shooting using my dominant eye so I decided I would try the switch. Now when I shoot my pistols I can use either hand. It's still tough to get away from my more natural left handed mount of the rifle but sitting in the woods I know I can easily switch if need be. Sure I close my right eye when I should left but it's been natural for yrs. It may not be the right way but it does work for me.

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from Ranx wrote 1 year 30 weeks ago

I'm left eye dominant and right handed.

I've just started shooting pistols at a relatively late age. I'm still trying both left and right hand to see which works for me.

The biggest problem I have is with shotguns. My Beretta Silver Pigeon II permits one to change and use cast off. That puts the gun nearer the left eye and I can shoot trap and wobble trap very well. For upland birds, which is what I hunt, that puts me pretty spot on.

Having said that, skeet and dove are still a problem.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from claybuster wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

No need to choose sides. Actually there is a new option for firearm shooters that are cross eye dominant. I, myself I am cross eye dominant and I've been struggling with this problem. Recently I found a product that works and it allows me to keep both eye open while shooting. It's called XD Solution xdsolution.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from habben97 wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

I shoot everything with both eyes open, my bow, .22, shotguns, and airguns. it helps me to be more aware of what is going on around me when I am shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Noureddine Ahmed wrote 9 weeks 2 days ago

Hey All
good article , i have a serious problem , my dominant eye is the right one , and i use my right hand , but i cant close my left eye and keep the dominant ( right ) opened , i doo like your sun glasses with a sticker on the left lens , is there a better solution please ?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 9 weeks 2 days ago

Noureddine Ahmed -- You should be able to keep both eyes open -- that's the best solution. The more you practice and the more you look at the target and not the gun the easier shooting with both eyes open becomes. Both eyes open is also the best and easiest way to shoot.
Otherwise tape on the glasses is the best way I know to block one eye's vision.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Dave_Maccar wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great post, Phil. I had a pistol instructor tell me once that when new shooters, or even experienced shooters, have trouble keeping both eyes open either out of habit or because it just feels right...he'd recommend they smudge a glob of Vaseline on the lens of their shooting glasses over their non-dominant eye, heavy at first. Gradually he'd have them put less and less on, reducing the opacity so the shooter can slowly get used to keeping both eyes open. I never tried it, because I never had this particular problem, but it seemed like sound advice. Just my two cents.-DM

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

When I had my right arm in a full cast, I had to hunt dove and quail left handed and after a day or two, I was back to shooting like nothing ever happened.

Improvise!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

i have varying eye dominance. but am i rightie.. had trouble shooting shotguns all my life cos of it but never with a rifle.. so i`m opting for a reddot so i actually can aim it.. sorts out all the problems for me cos ive already tried it and shooting skeet was almost boring after :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ckRich wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Go with the dominant eye. I myself am somewhat of a freak of nature... dominant: any gun and I have to use my left eye, but I can use either eye for archery and atually prefer to shoot right-handed. Oh, and I'm a natural southpaw.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My 13 year old son has a dominant left eye and he's right handed. He tried it both ways (right and left handed) and decided to use his right eye/right side.

It works for him.....

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pudgexl29 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

That vaseline idea sounds good. My sister has that problem. I will recomend that thanks

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Good topic.

I've found new shooters that were left eye dominant and shooting right-handed. They generally just started to shoot and didn't have much help or training. Never knew about a dominant eye.

Like many lefties, I grew up having to use right-handed stuff. As a kid, I "inherited" my right-handed cousin's baseball glove, so I grew up throwing right-handed...same with my bow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from abmcp13 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great article Phil, I never had heard of a good way to test eye dominance before, and my father never tested mine when I first started shooting, he wasn't an avid shooter himself. I have one question for you: After watching the video I determined my left eye is dominant, but I've been shooting a right handed gun with just my right eye (left closed) for nine years, would it be benificial for me to learn to reshoot left handed? Thank you.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from krwheeler wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

We switched lots of boys at Scout Camp last year. We kept an eye on who was performing gymnastics trying to get their "good eye" to line up with the scope. Almost all of the kids that we switched to shooting left handed improved their marksmanship.

As for me and my boss on the rifle range, we discovered we were both "cross eye" dominant, but we were too old to change.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PawPaw wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I concur. I'm predominately left-handed, but my Dad tested me for eye dominance when I began shooting and I'm right-eye dominant. He taught me to shoot right-handed and I couldn't be happier.

On the other hand, two of my six grandsons are left-eye dominant. Guess which side I'm teaching them to shoot from? That's correct! Now I'm buying left-hand bolt rifles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluegraytx wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I'm both center-dominant and ambidexterous. When my father gave me a BB gun at the age of nine I had a difficult time choosing a side until we built a duck blind a few years later and hunted shoulder-to-shoulder. It was my father who suggested that it would be best if I took the left side of the blind and fired southpaw while he did the opposite, and we held to that order when pheasant hunting. It wasn't until I went in the Army that I made a choice that became permanent. With the promise of a three-day pass for those shooting expert at the end of four weeks of trainfire, I opted to fire the M-1 from my hunting side. I've been a southpaw, one-eyed shooter ever since ... and still smiling 50 years later over my three days in San Francisco.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Good post, Phil. I was right eye dominant until I had cataract surgery on the left eye and now am left eye dominant. I also have mono-vision due to an early operation at age four for a lazy eye, an event that leaves me with very little depth perception. I've shot both ways with rifle and shotguns for years but remain best from the right side. Is anyone else so afflicted?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My two bits would say to go with the dominant eye. A person can learn to shoot from either side with a little practice to the point it would be natural, chosen side to shoot from in a relatively short time. The barrel needs to be over the dominant eye.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My kid is left eye, right hand. I switched him soon after we started plinking with the BB gun. The affect was immediate, he started hitting things. I'd been to a couple of shooting events and I asked some experienced coaches and they all said the same thing, he should shoot lefty.

I've no doubt it will be a pain, but it seems like it's worth it to hit what your aiming at.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I think it is always best to go with the dominant eye. I once lost the sight of my right eye for several months until my vision was restored surgically. During the dark period, I taught myself to shoot left-handed, and in a very short while it felt just as natural as when I was shooting right handed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I wonder if blocking the non dominant eye helps under normal shooting?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I discovered my righthanded son was left-eye dominant the first time he tried to shoot a cork gun. When he moved up to a bb gun and was still leaning his head over the stock so he could look down the barrel with his left eye I figured it was time to do something. I tried the old vaseline on the sunglass lens and when he had trouble with that we tried having him shoot lefthanded. Unfortunately, I am the least ambidextrous person in the world and he evidently inherited that from me. I even though briefly about mortgaging the house and having custom crossover stocks built for him, but by that time he had become so adept at shooting with his awkward hold that it didn't seem worth the money. He's 28 now and somehow or another he's a pretty darned good shot with rifle and shotgun, but I'll be damned if I know how.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I agree that a person should shoot off the shoulder that their dominant eye is above. If it is necessary to switch, this should be done as early as possible to make gun handling more comfortable and allow the ability to shoot both eyes open (as opposed to myself who uses the both eyes closed technique). The main benefit gained shooting both eyes open is depth perception which is lost with one eyed shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mexhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Great post, no wounder my dad is such a lousy shot

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ableskeever wrote 2 years 44 weeks ago

I never thought about it until I started shooting pistols. I had already naturally gone right-handed with rifles and shotguns because of eye dominance and the bad habit of closing one eye already (now with both eyes open... even scanning with a scope). Being of a right-eye, left-handed persuasion, I had trouble with pistols because my left hand naturally went for the pistol. Once I got better mechanics with my grip (thanks to a MagPul video) I started going right-handed with the pistol as well. I guess being left-handed naturally means that I'm that much quicker with my reloads.

Personally, I think that natural lefties have an advantage towards being ambidextrous in this world where many things are geared towards righties.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from claybuster wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

No need to choose sides. Actually there is a new option for firearm shooters that are cross eye dominant. I, myself I am cross eye dominant and I've been struggling with this problem. Recently I found a product that works and it allows me to keep both eye open while shooting. It's called XD Solution xdsolution.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Right eye dominate so I shoot right handed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I'm lucky. Right eye, right handed. My left side is useless for the most part. Except for ping-pong...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My oldest daughter is left eye/right hand.
She passed her CLEET certification course with a near record with her handgun, canting her gun slightly to the left and her head at a God awful angle to the right!!!
When she picks up a shotgun, she looks like she's having some sort of "spastic" event! BUT...she's deadly with it!!
How?
I have no idea! But it works for her!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

The "spastic event" doesn't work very well with a flushing bird, or a crossing duck. Your dominant eye lines up with the target, the other eye is off considerably to the side. Doesn't seem like much choice to me..you have to place the dominant eye over the barrel. Shotgun shooters alter the cast off on the stocks to line up with the dominant eye in precisely the right position. Why wouldn't you learn to shoot from that side? Can't get a conversion on your safety? I think I'd make those adjustments before I lined up with the eye that places the target off line.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I think it was my post which started all this. After many years I am, as was said, ambidextrous. Most of the time I can get my right eye to be dominant, but sometimes it gets lazy and I miss. The blocking out of one eye is fine on a skeet or trap shoot, but what about when you're hunting, especially on rough or uneven ground?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

As a shooter I consider myself a rookie though I have been shooting on and off for years. My biggest problem has been my poor eyesight and ability to focus with both eyes open. I just put a patch over the left lense of my shooting glasses and wow, what a difference it makes. I have been carefully paying attention to your tips on here and applying them to the range and have had success. Phil, Thank you for the help.

Picked up a new Citori yesterday and a copy of Michael McIntosh's Shotguns and Shooting. Cannot wait for shooting season to begin. (the range is currently flooded)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ClayS wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

My son who just turned 12 is right handed/left eye dominant, however he just started wearing contact lenses with a perscription intended to assist the bad right eye - better for the right and worse for the left in order to bring them more in-line. The doc says that over time the right should improve greatly and bring his vision back to a more normal state. So long winded windup to ask the question - how does a person's eye perscription play into things? Should I switch my son to shooting left hand if his current lenses mitigate that dominance to a great degree, and may actually influence a change of dominance over time? Kind of stumped there...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GJLOCY wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

If a shooter is found to have cross eye dominance then change to that side if possible as early as possible. I only discovered I was left eye dominant at a sporting clays event when a spoter notice where all of my shoots were hitting (or not). His suggestion was (similar to the vaseline idea) was to use "chapstick" on the left lens of my shooting glasses. I saw an immediate improvement! I have also heard of using "scotch" tape across the field of view on the lens. The tape or chapstick method work, but are tougher to adjust to in the field because of the depth perception issue.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Spencer Tomb wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

Letting a novice or near novice shooter continue to shoot cross dominantly is a serious mistake. It takes only a few weeks to get past the awkward stage for young shooters.

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from focusfront wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

I am right handed so I shot right-handed for many years, even though I am left eye dominant. In light of the sparse selection of left-handed guns in the world, I would definitely recommend that anyone who CAN go right SHOULD go right. Having been turned into an unwilling lefty due to a blinding right eye injury, I know exactly what I am talking about.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

RES1956 Agreed..How hard is it to shoot off the dominant eye side?..or find a gun that is left handed?..I'd go the XTRA mile to find one, and shoot off the dominant eye side. Like asking a person to eat with a fork using their other hand...don't take long for that to become the dominant hand.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

mexhunter..Great excuse to have. "Darn, I hit the bird, but it was the 2nd one...the one that didn't exist.

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from quackdr wrote 2 years 40 weeks ago

If you can, it is always best to have the shooter shoot off the dominant eye side. If it proves too difficult for an old timer to switch or if you are "central dominant" (ambidextrious eyes), blocking the non-mounted eye with chap stick, anti fog stick, dot of liquid soap,clear tape etc. on the shooting glasses works best if you cover the smallest spot possible on that lens. With your empty gun mounted, have a buddy look back at you over the barrel and place a tiny piece of wet paper the size of your pupil on the outside of your shooting glasses lens that blocks the view of the non-mounted eye.(about the size of a pencil eraser). You can then accurately replace this paper with a small dot of scotch tape on the inside of that lens. This will preserve your binocular vision (and therefore depth perception) until the last instant before you mount and pull the trigger. No obstruction of your vision until you have mounted the gun, and by then it should be going bang!

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from b1bendt wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

Being left handed it wasn't until about 10 yrs ago that I found I was right eye dominant. I have always shot everything left handed and got used to having empties fly back at me. I started trying to shoot right handed first pistol then rifle. Hard as heck to get used to after shooting left handed for 40 yrs but I kept trying. I felt I was more accurate with the rifle shooting using my dominant eye so I decided I would try the switch. Now when I shoot my pistols I can use either hand. It's still tough to get away from my more natural left handed mount of the rifle but sitting in the woods I know I can easily switch if need be. Sure I close my right eye when I should left but it's been natural for yrs. It may not be the right way but it does work for me.

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from Ranx wrote 1 year 30 weeks ago

I'm left eye dominant and right handed.

I've just started shooting pistols at a relatively late age. I'm still trying both left and right hand to see which works for me.

The biggest problem I have is with shotguns. My Beretta Silver Pigeon II permits one to change and use cast off. That puts the gun nearer the left eye and I can shoot trap and wobble trap very well. For upland birds, which is what I hunt, that puts me pretty spot on.

Having said that, skeet and dove are still a problem.

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from habben97 wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

I shoot everything with both eyes open, my bow, .22, shotguns, and airguns. it helps me to be more aware of what is going on around me when I am shooting.

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from Noureddine Ahmed wrote 9 weeks 2 days ago

Hey All
good article , i have a serious problem , my dominant eye is the right one , and i use my right hand , but i cant close my left eye and keep the dominant ( right ) opened , i doo like your sun glasses with a sticker on the left lens , is there a better solution please ?

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from philbourjaily wrote 9 weeks 2 days ago

Noureddine Ahmed -- You should be able to keep both eyes open -- that's the best solution. The more you practice and the more you look at the target and not the gun the easier shooting with both eyes open becomes. Both eyes open is also the best and easiest way to shoot.
Otherwise tape on the glasses is the best way I know to block one eye's vision.

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